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Noob
07-25-2014, 08:52 PM
Hey guys,

well as my ID says im noob on this so don't laugh it off or do ;D

i googled and got lots of info got me dizzy whats right or wrong in the end.

so here is the questions

in country i leave having any alcoholic beverage is forbidden so buying wine or whatever in normal store is out of question.
as it goes for wine yeast or any yeast except bread yeast. the only one i manage to buy is saf-levure i think its french or something.

can i still make wine or beer with this one?
i checked few chemical info about yeast make methanol over pectin "fibers/woody things like seeds bla bla" so if i lower them and avoid high temperature over distill its safe to drink is that right?

i heard water temperature should be about 40c for good fermentation. so i boiled some what i think it was higher than that it still fermenting like crazy enough to pump the big balloon :o

since it was high temperature is it safe or does this also make methanol and i have to avoid this batch?

sorry about noobs question types thou many ppls dies and goes blind in my country i just dont like become one of those

thanks for reading and i hope get real answers

cheers

Honeyhog
07-25-2014, 09:54 PM
You need to make a JOAM. It means Joe's Ancient Orange Mead. The recipe uses bread yeast and requires all things you can get at a local market. Follow the recipe in this thread exactly and it will get you something pleasantly drinkable http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php/6885-Joe-Mattioli-s-Foolproof-Ancient-Orange-Clove-and-Cinnamon-Mead. For an airlock over your jug you can use a balloon with a few pinpricks in it. Remember to use a US gallon and not an Imperial(UK)gallon. Be careful.

joemirando
07-25-2014, 10:06 PM
Noob,

Bread yeast will consume sugars and produce ethanol (and a small amount of other alcohols like methanol) and carbon dioxide.
There are a couple of differences between bread yeast and wine yeasts, but they work the same way. Bread yeast does not settle out as well as most wine yeasts, it has a lower alcohol tolerance, and it can leave more of a 'yeasty' taste than wine yeasts. Nonetheless, it can be used to make a very enjoyable alcoholic drink.

I think a large part of what you're talking about is distilling to make "hard liquor". This is illegal in most places, not just where you are, and for very good reasons. Heat and a combustible substance like ethanol are a bad combination, and using improper equipment can make the stuff deadly.

Methanol (wood alcohol) is poisonous, but it would take larger quantities than you will likely be able to produce by fermentation to kill you.

Make a nice honey wine, or a beer or ale. Distilled spirits take some extra equipment and expertise. Mead can be made with 2 or 3 simple ingredients and nothing more than a gallon jug, a toy balloon and some time.

If you have access to honey, oranges, raisins, bread yeast, cinnamon, cloves and water, you can make a very nice orange mead. It is a beginner's mead, but it is amazingly good for the ingredients and equipment required.

Again:
Mead/wine/beer = good
distilled spirits = bad
;D

This forum is the best place in the world to ask noob questions. The only dumb question is the one that is never asked.

Welcome aboard!
Joe

Honeyhog
07-25-2014, 10:14 PM
The must temperature for fermenting wines should be lower than 40C more like 18-30C, depending on the tolerance of the yeast. At higher temperatures yeast can produce what are called fusels, although not deadly they make the alcohol in you drink very "hot" tasting, unpleasant to drink and takes a long time to age out. If it is quite hot tasting when it's done if you can find some oak and make shavings, toast them a bit and add them to your must for a few weeks it will help.

Noob
07-25-2014, 11:30 PM
wow that was fast tnx :D, okis i gonna try keep you posted how did it go

fatbloke
07-26-2014, 04:44 AM
It's pretty much as both Joe and HH say.

All ferments will make a tiny amount of methanol, but not enough to become a problem (put any alcoholic drinks through a mass spectrometer, and you'd find it).

If you can get honey, oranges, raisins and the spices (any bread yeast should do, fleischmanns is a US rand - I can't get it here either and my local stuff works fine), then you can make it.

Irrespective of whether the alcohol ban is cultural or taxation based, if you're fermenting sugar, you will make ethanol. Just that all the death and blindness info, while theoretically possible, are mostly not corrected, because of your government not wanting you to make stuff for one or both the above mentioned reasons.......

The temperature issue mentioned above ? It's best to try and keep it to about the 18 to 20C sort of area as the product is better tasting.......

Chevette Girl
07-26-2014, 11:51 AM
Be careful if what you're doing is illegal... but you're extremely unlikely to die or go blind from homemade wine or mead so long as you don't try distilling it, the small amounts of things other than ethanol in wine and mead don't become a problem unless you distill it.

Happy meadmaking, Joe's Ancient Orange is a great recipe for when you can't get proper wine stuff and if you check the forum for Joe's Ancient Orange variations, you'll find a bunch of other things we've tried to do with that recipe, many of which work just fine.

Noob
07-26-2014, 01:19 PM
thanks guys for all replies and information i'm happy to join in ;)

well i made that recipe today i keep you posted how it turn out in future,
as matter of that high temperature last time i tried its been 10 days and it still making bubble and smell like mass CO2 even is any alcohol there CO2 masking the smell. i gonna keep checking it.

for distill i dont like distill im not heavy drinker anyway, i can't tolerate high alcohol content :P
this mead sounds yummy one i hope it turn out well.

just adding to my questions.

how am i suppose to stop fermenting @ some point i dotn like dry drink abit sweetness would be nice, i know freezing wont stop yeast and i still afraid of even word distill.
so how to keep bit sweetness on mead or wine.

coz as far as i know as long 1 bit of sugar in it yeast keep turn it to alcohol and make it dry

thanks for all support and quick answers ^_^

Chevette Girl
07-26-2014, 02:27 PM
If you used bread yeast and 3.5 lb of honey for a gallon of Joe's Ancient Orange mead, it shouldn't finish dry. Bread yeast only has an alcohol tolerance of around 12% and there's enough sugar in that recipe to go up to 16% or more, so your yeast should give up long before they run out of sugar so you shouldn't have to stop it, it will stop on its own in maybe 3-5 weeks or so and will leave some sweetness. Make sure you're still using your baloon airlock during this point because as the fermentation continues, it will keep producing CO2 and keeping it closed up is a bad idea as it will build up pressure and could leak or cause the container to explode if left too long.

As for the ferment you started already, well, fermentations take as long as they take, some are complete and stop fizzing in less than a week, some take more than a month to complete. Swirl it around once a day to help keep the yeast suspended so they can do their job.

If you used the wine yeast you found and it does take the mead dry, then you can just add small bits of honey to sweeten it up. We call this step-feeding, every time it goes too dry, sweeten it up but not too much, then let the yeast do their thing, then check it again in a week, and if it's gone dry again, add a bit more honey until you like the level of sweetness. You can keep doing this until the yeast finally gives up, it's rare for even most wine yeasts to go above 18-19% alcohol before they give up.

Noob
07-26-2014, 05:00 PM
thanks for update info :)

well no wine yeast available in my country, so i guess sweeten by method you mentioned should be easy.
for that batch i keep watch see when it will finishes thanks :)

joemirando
07-26-2014, 07:55 PM
What ChevetteGirl said.

Basically, if you use 3.5 lb (1.587 kg) honey for a 1 gallon (3.78 liter), and ferment it with bread yeast, the yeast will die due to alcohol poisoning before all the sugar is gone, leaving you with a drink of between 10% and 12% alcohol and still enough sugar to make it sweet.

Just remember the three major rules of mead making:

[*=1]Never throw mead away
[*=1]Patience is an ingredient added at every step
[*=1]Never throw mead away


There you have it! <grin>

Joe

Noob
07-27-2014, 03:52 AM
good to know thanks :)

well i should work on my patience too hahaha
i usually don't trow away anything i will find another way to use it if it fails. thou i hope i don't

quick question i always see ppl sya put in dark cellar or storage room or dark room, i have normal room don't have these dark places and as far as i can see yeast doing what they suppose to do.

so darkness provide what exactly faster better work or its just people assumption it should be in dark place?

fatbloke
07-27-2014, 04:27 AM
Neither. Light can damage the product with bleaching effect. It's not a quick process but hot places are often bright/light.

When fruit has been used in the brew, it can have a bigger effect. It's why wines etc are usually bottled in green or brown glass. Beer is similar, but it's the hops in beer that degrade, affecting the flavour.

The cool temperature thing, is that the aging process is better at cooler temps so normally 8 to 12C is thought optimum......

Noob
07-27-2014, 04:44 AM
oh yeah you are right sun always ruin the smell of fruits and actually any flavor so that's why.
hmm i dont have dark room i guess have to figure out how block direct light before i ruin my new joam batch.

thanks alot

fatbloke
07-27-2014, 06:45 AM
oh yeah you are right sun always ruin the smell of fruits and actually any flavor so that's why.
hmm i dont have dark room i guess have to figure out how block direct light before i ruin my new joam batch.

thanks alot
Aluminium cooking foil wrapped round the fermenter works well for darkness.....

Noob
07-27-2014, 07:37 AM
yeah but its metal base im not sure it over heat under sun or not, if i didnt find better solution i guess do this for time being

Chevette Girl
07-27-2014, 08:57 AM
Shiny side out to reflect? It worked with our fish tank that was too close to the fireplace...

I used to have my brewing shelf in the kitchen window so I just blocked the half of the window that shone on the shelf with a tablecloth. Put a t-shirt on the carboy, wrap a blanket around it, make a tablecloth tent around it, put a piece of cardboard up against it or a box around it... all kinds of things you can do to block light.

Noob
07-27-2014, 09:05 AM
cool idear white t-shirt could reflect back some of light and not over heat it 2 thanks chevette

fatbloke
07-27-2014, 10:09 AM
yeah but its metal base im not sure it over heat under sun or not, if i didnt find better solution i guess do this for time being
As CG suggests. In any case, it's not a good idea to keep anything like that in direct sun. Shaded (and preferably cool) area is considerably better......

If you can do the white t-shirt idea, and then put the whole thing in a pan with water, the water will spread up the cloth "wicking" and any breeze etc, will then help remove any excess warmth/heat some - this is often called a "swamp cooler"....

joemirando
07-27-2014, 12:21 PM
yeah but its metal base im not sure it over heat under sun or not, if i didnt find better solution i guess do this for time being

Complete darkness is not necessary. If you keep it out of direct sunlight, you should be okay. Find a corner somewhere that is in shadow or at least out of direct sunlight.

As either Fatbloke or Chevette Girl has said, if temperature is an issue, you can cover the jug/carboy with a towel or tee shirt and put it in a tub with water, the water will saturate the cloth and evaporate, taking some heat with it, creating a simple heat exchanger and cooling your mead by a few degrees.

Good luck,
Joe

Honeyhog
07-27-2014, 01:38 PM
I keep my carboys in a hallway that doesn't stay completely dark but never has direct sunlight in it.

Noob
07-28-2014, 06:28 PM
well for now my carboy wearing my tshirt kinda look funny hehe, i hope i grow some patient due making mead lol

since there is no microwave mode lol

Honeyhog
07-28-2014, 08:45 PM
well for now my carboy wearing my tshirt kinda look funny hehe, i hope i grow some patient due making mead lol

since there is no microwave mode lol
You should make a paper mache head to go on top, hahahahahahaha.

Noob
07-31-2014, 07:24 PM
well update on first mead batch ;D

it semi smell like co2 and still fermenting, thou middle of all those i can smell good alcohol and honey im exciting see how it will finishes thanks for all help guys

cheers :cool:

mannye
08-04-2014, 10:36 AM
Remember it will take at least 8 weeks to be anywhere near ready to drink. Probably more like 10 or 12 weeks.

Noob
08-04-2014, 01:16 PM
lol yeah i need to grow patience ;) :P

joemirando
08-04-2014, 08:00 PM
lol yeah i need to grow patience ;) :P

Okay, everybody join in the chant!

"What do we want?
PATIENCE!
When do we want it?
NOW!!"
:headbang:

Noob
08-05-2014, 06:12 AM
hahaha joe,

well with my checking carboy every 5mins either i become superman laser eye the mead batch or, i turn to indian guru hahaha:icon_cyclops:

Okay, everybody join in the chant!

"What do we want?
PATIENCE!
When do we want it?
NOW!!"
:headbang:

Noob
08-05-2014, 12:21 PM
oops i guess i used laser eyes after all my airlock stop bubbling ???
but i can still hear noises of fermentation hmm whats going on with time table you guys told me it should still working for very long time did i done something wrong :crybaby2:

mannye
08-05-2014, 08:16 PM
The only way to know for sure is to measure with a hydrometer. If you are worried about something going wrong, your sense of smell and taste are your best tools. Smell it and taste it... Good? Don't worry.

Chevette Girl
08-06-2014, 12:10 AM
If it still looks fizzy and you hear it too but your airlock isn't bubbling, then chances are your airlock seal isn't tight. Stick it back in the jug and quit poking it every 5 minutes :)

Noob
08-06-2014, 01:01 AM
i guess i endup with laser eye or something pierce it :icon_cyclops_ani: , i can't find where is the gas leak its tight seal even i have problem open it hehe
im @ the work atm so gonna try taste, smell and reseal and stop poking it see this time how much i can grow my patience ;D

as matter of hearing, it fizzing like cold pepsi :D
thats y made me wonder where all gas go no bubble on airlock ???

anyway i let u kno know how it taste this afternoon

cheers

Noob
08-07-2014, 04:16 PM
i opened it to look if airlock clogged or not well that wasn't the case,
still fizzing didnt smell like vinegar either,
i sealed even used duck tape to ubber seal the drum,

well still no bubble i guess wait till later on, no more poking hahaha :icon_cyclops_ani:

Noob
09-10-2014, 08:57 PM
ok i change duck tape lol

while was doing that i sneak pick the must, its not clear after month and few days, smell like lemon, bit grape! weird just few raisin can change smell this much!
tried with my crappy Hydrometer "only has abv numbers on it" seems still lots of honey sugar in must, it show 0% alcohol .... meh

i test it a little, even its not finished i can say it gonna be rocket fuel :o , its already super strong gonna check it in few months.
when its done i send another update + photo

Cheers and thank for all helps mead lovers here provided for first timer ppl like me ^_^
:cheers:

Noob
10-18-2014, 06:37 AM
hello again,

thank you again for all helps its been 2 months and some days passed since my first experiment, here is my cloudy mead first racking http://i58.tinypic.com/21bj5ti.jpg

I wonder after how long it become clear!
should i use some sorta clarifying agent to it? or just let it age!?

as matter of taste its semi sweet yet strong bad part is it still smell like lemon bread :P

i wonder when that will be fix 2
so if anyone can help me on this part i really appreciate it

Chevette Girl
10-20-2014, 01:17 AM
I'd just let it age a while, mine sometimes take several months to clear up.

Yeast makes acidity when it ferments so maybe that's what you're describing as lemon?

If your hydrometer that only has numbers for ABV says 0%, it's probably for potential alcohol and if it says 0% then your fermentation is done and the mead is dry.

Dry meads taste bad to me. Very young dry meads taste even worse. Give it six months before you pass judgement on what it tastes like, and before you declare anything a total failure, try adding just a little honey to a glass of it and see if that improves things.

Noob
10-20-2014, 04:54 PM
thank i keep checking see if it clearup or nop its very dry it smell like honey but taste rocket fuel lol.
i gonna wait for clearing then added more honey hopefully be edible rocket fuel hahahaha

Chevette Girl
10-20-2014, 10:22 PM
If it's gone dry and you want to add honey and you don't have stabilizing chemicals, I'd suggest you add the honey now, the yeast may continue to eat and then you'll just have to wait for it to clear all over again every time the yeast decides your backsweetening honey is a snack.