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View Full Version : Degassing your mead after primary fermentation is done?



McJeff
11-15-2014, 01:34 PM
How often do you do it? And how do you do it?

fatbloke
11-16-2014, 06:15 AM
Stirring with a de-gassing "thingummyjig" maybe ? Vacuum pump ? Has the batch finished ?

Etc, etc........

McJeff
11-16-2014, 08:41 AM
Stirring with a de-gassing "thingummyjig" maybe ? Vacuum pump ? Has the batch finished ?

Etc, etc........

Batch has finished and been aging for 2 months. normally ill just give it a gentle stir with a long spoon, but im just finding that not that effective. After doing some other research ive found the "thingummyjig" you are talking about, watching the demostrative video i clearly am not degassing enough.

So once its degassed and its not fermenting there should be no reason to need to degas again right?

McJeff
11-16-2014, 08:59 AM
omg i just started looking at some vacuum pumps and watching video. totally cool, looks like i just bought another tool/toy ;)

fatbloke
11-16-2014, 11:41 AM
I don't usually bother to de-gas until just before bottling. All the time there's small amounts coming outnaturally, it's a convenient defence against possible oxidation.

McJeff
11-16-2014, 11:51 AM
But even that's not a bad idea to do just before bottling. Also if it helps it clear that much faster, it's money well spent I think.

mannye
11-16-2014, 11:26 PM
I'm with fatbloke. No need to degas until before bottling. Every time you rack, you will take a bunch of co2 out. I find that by the time I rack off the primary lees into secondary, rack off that onto the finings, rack the cold crashed "super kleered" into the final aging carboy and THEN go through the filter, there ain't no mo' co2.

This is of course assuming you degas during the first few days.


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.

EJM3
11-17-2014, 08:00 AM
Mine I am just syphoning into secondary, adding any flavorants I choose, then just syphoning off and letting it sit there in bulk for a year or so. On or off the lees (Sur Lie as most of mine will be). Any degassing will happen naturally during that time. Additionally I am starting to use Propylene Glycol in my air locks to prevent them from drying out and my mead oxidizing from life happening and forgetting about them (like we are supposed to do. That will happen whether or not you want it to, the forgetting part that is... Especially with a few glasses of your finest in you once the meadery is in full swing ;D.

GntlKnigt1
11-17-2014, 12:59 PM
Strange. I've never had one dry out......ever

mannye
11-17-2014, 01:36 PM
Airlock? Nope. Me either. It's probably the humid environment.


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.

EJM3
11-17-2014, 05:07 PM
I live in Leavenworth WA and it's hot in the Summer, over 100F, and cold in the Winters (we hit -10F this past Winter). So lots of dry air. Using the vodka in my airlocks was a whack-a-mole enterprise. But my house is 101 years old and impossible to keep clean. The dust is reminiscent of the grapes of wrath at times. So I used vodka as a sterilizing fluid and airlock fluid. The fruit flies reached such proportions that they were more of a plague than an infestation, so I slung vodka around like a sprinkler this Summer. The last ones are only now just now dying off (little basetards!).

I have even gone so far as to switch to Propylene Glycol in all of my airlocks. here is the link to my thread on that: http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php/23548-Propylene-Glycol-(PG)-Airlocks-and-Aging?highlight=Propylene+Glycol

GntlKnigt1
11-17-2014, 06:19 PM
I just use regular metabisulfite sanitizer. I always have some mixed up and it does the job.

mannye
11-17-2014, 08:08 PM
My house is also of the "old" variety.. 1938...so not quite a hundred, but next to the bay and salt water..I'm amazed it's still standing. I get 9 of these things once a year...

http://www.raidkillsbugs.com/en-us/products/raid-fumigator-fumigating-fogger

and go away for one night. No more bugs. The rest of the year I use geckos (they are plentiful..so I catch them and throw them in the house) and they take care of the occasional bug that gets in the door. I can't say enough about those fumigators. They are amazing. Remember, I live in the tropics. Bugs here have unions. They organize parades. You can walk in your house and find this kind of thing going on:

http://cdn.trendhunterstatic.com/thumbs/uniqlo-undercover-lookbook.jpeg

I wouldn't mind except I hate Elgar and that's all they would play...lol.

kudapucat
11-17-2014, 08:36 PM
I've had them dry out. After extended aging.
Our summers get to 115 in the shade. Winter's rarely below 30. (dang crazy units - I had to look it up)
I just check it once a month and top it up. I don't bother with any fancy liquids.

mannye
11-17-2014, 10:13 PM
I've had them dry out. After extended aging.
Our summers get to 115 in the shade. Winter's rarely below 30. (dang crazy units - I had to look it up)
I just check it once a month and top it up. I don't bother with any fancy liquids.

So you have my weather, just not humid? (although here the summers are 90-100 and the winter almost never goes under 45) That would be great if the humidity wasn't hovering at 70-80% all the time. AND to clarify... WE use the right numbers.... you people use that new-fangled upstart scale. ;D

mannye
11-17-2014, 10:15 PM
Wow...amazing how far we can hijack a thread... I simply cannot wait for the weekend I get together with a bunch of you maniacs. :)

EJM3
11-18-2014, 02:19 AM
mannye the maniacal Dalek
had a shiny eyepiece
and if you ever saw it
you would even say it glowed

all of the other Dalek's
used to live in fear of him
because if they ever miffed him
he would shoot and blast them dead

mannye
11-18-2014, 02:35 AM
Hahaha. That was awesome!


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.

kudapucat
11-18-2014, 06:52 AM
What just happened?

@Mannye, 0-45 is much easier than those silly numbers I mentioned before.
You can fry an egg on the bonnet of your car on those days.
Can't do that over in your soggy neck of the woods.