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View Full Version : A mazer is a drinking vessel, NOT a meadmaker



wirewraps
11-25-2014, 11:01 AM
I am rather new to mead making, and have been doing a lot of reading to educate myself. I notice that a lot of people refer to meadmakers as mazers. I believe this has become a common mistake because of the Mazer Cup. It's probably not the biggest issue in the world, but I thought it should be brought up.

homoeccentricus
11-25-2014, 11:59 AM
Surely you are not insinuating that Mazer Rackham was named after a drinking vessel???

EJM3
11-25-2014, 01:08 PM
Please tell me it ain't so!! AToE will be crushed! CRUSHED I tell you!!!

GntlKnigt1
11-25-2014, 02:09 PM
Rest easy. Wikipedia to the rescue....
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mazer

Sent from Arthur Dent's towel smothering a volume of Vogon poetry, some of which just leaked out.

ostensibly
11-25-2014, 07:21 PM
ha! Mazer Rackham.

ScottBehrens
11-25-2014, 07:32 PM
sometimes I'd druther be the vessel

skunkboy
11-25-2014, 09:47 PM
mazer, meadher, whatever, delicious delicious product...

mannye
11-26-2014, 01:02 AM
I'm a mazer and by that I mean a vessel full of mead.

ostensibly
11-26-2014, 10:28 AM
I just like mazes. Am I in the wrong place?

GntlKnigt1
11-26-2014, 12:14 PM
Ostensibly is lost...send out search parties

Sent from Arthur Dent's towel smothering a volume of Vogon poetry, some of which just leaked out.

mannye
11-26-2014, 06:28 PM
Like Zaphod, I always send down a scout, then if it doesn't report back, another then if that one doesn't report back I send a platoon!


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
U g

EJM3
11-26-2014, 07:21 PM
Just crack open some mead and ostensibly will find you. Then you can have the party, I mean you got an open bottle of mead!>

GntlKnigt1
11-27-2014, 03:23 AM
Mannye, does the scout wear a red shirt?

mannye
11-27-2014, 03:50 AM
Mannye, does the scout wear a red shirt?

Always. It assures the search party's inevitability

GntlKnigt1
11-27-2014, 09:48 AM
He's dead, Jim.

joemirando
11-27-2014, 11:12 AM
Dammit Jim, I'm a doctor, not a mazer!

kudapucat
11-29-2014, 06:53 AM
Whilst the banter is humorous, I tend to agree with the OP.
Also, when arguing that the masses are misusing a word; Wikipedia is an unacceptably poor reference.
Disclaimer: I am a linguistic prescriptivist.

mannye
11-29-2014, 10:36 AM
Is there a reference we can point to (not wiki) that will end the debate once and for all?

My initial searches on free sites are not looking good for the "maker" definition. Most say a mazer is a drinking bowl originally made from hard wood.

So..... It may be time to get our vocabulary straight!

Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
U g

EJM3
11-29-2014, 07:21 PM
Nah, we'll just create our own unique vocabulary. No one has made mead in any kind of large scale (for the time!) production for a chunk of time, and most of what we do know is only using modern methods, yeasts, and nutrients, the rest is lost to the winds history. There is no way to know if they were called mazer, or meader, or honigweinbrauer! So lets just saddle up our keyboards (I said saddle NOT straddle mannye!!!), and create vocabulary to go with a burgeoning revival of the nectar of the GODS.

kudapucat
11-30-2014, 08:52 AM
I have no issue with creating vocabulary. It's malapropism I dislike.
Want to make something up? So make it up! Don't twist a 'near enough' word to your own ends. It's just not right.

kuri
11-30-2014, 10:56 AM
You're absolutely right. We shouldn't twist the word "mazer" into a new meaning. Rather, we should create a whole new word for our purposes. From scratch, as it were. With no history. I therefor propose the following completely new as of this moment word for indicating a mead maker: mazer.

I know some of you will object to its obvious similarity to extant vocabulary, though those of you who are in this category will have clearly missed the intent, as well as the intended etymology. This word shares a root with "amaze", because our production can be 'mazing. Any similarities with other vocabulary is no more than inescapable syncretism (extended to roots, but then why should inflectional forms be special?).

kudapucat
11-30-2014, 04:52 PM
I fart in your general direction.

joemirando
11-30-2014, 04:54 PM
Your mother was a hamster, and your father smelt...
of Elderberries!

kudapucat
11-30-2014, 04:57 PM
Thanks Joe, it was either this, or invoke Godwin's law.

joemirando
11-30-2014, 05:10 PM
sometimes I'd druther be the vessel

Reminds me of what my grandfather used to say:
Sometimes you're the windshield.
Sometimes you're the bug.
;)

joemirando
11-30-2014, 05:21 PM
So let's cut to the chase here...
What DO you call a maker of mead?... besides obsessed, I mean. <grin>

EJM3
11-30-2014, 06:00 PM
Obsessive Compulsive??

I know that before I was kind of like "yeah that's ok, but I don't know how to ferment things like this to make them better", and now i'm more like "I bet that would taste interesting if I threw it in the fermentor, and that, and that, and that..." Maybe call it OCMMD, "Obsessive Compulsive Mead Making Disorder".

Hrm, then again there is something like: modernedaghonigweinbrouwerijmeister ?? (Being in a relationship with a Dutchman I am somewhat predisposed to smash and mangle. Doug knows what I mean!)

The Japanese version can get a little more difficult though: 現代の蜂蜜ワインの醸造マスター

And lastly is this one: אדון דבש

kuri
11-30-2014, 09:16 PM
So let's cut to the chase here...
What DO you call a maker of mead?... besides obsessed, I mean. <grin>

We could take a vote:
meader
meadster
mead maker
meadier
meadist
meddler
mazer filler
honey winer
hachimitsuhakkoumeijin (蜂蜜発酵名人)
aguamielisto/aguamielista
cool
mazer, son/daughter of hamster, surrounded by an air of farts and elderberries

joemirando
11-30-2014, 09:35 PM
We could take a vote:
meader
meadster
mead maker
meadier
meadist
meddler
mazer filler
honey winer
hachimitsuhakkoumeijin (蜂蜜発酵名人)
aguamielisto/aguamielista
cool
mazer, son/daughter of hamster, surrounded by an air of farts and elderberries

You forgot "empty-headed animal food trough wiper". <grin>

kuri
11-30-2014, 10:09 PM
You forgot "empty-headed animal food trough wiper". <grin>

of other people's bottoms?

joemirando
11-30-2014, 10:15 PM
of other people's bottoms?

... With their silly knees bent, prancing about advancing behavior.
Yeah, I've watched that movie far too many times. ;)

curgoth
11-30-2014, 11:35 PM
As my various pro-editor friends keep telling me: language is descriptive, not proscriptive. If enough people keep using a word one way long enough, that's language. "Literal" used to refer to "written down". Now it's "actually happened" transitioning to "figuratively with emphasis".

joemirando
12-01-2014, 12:20 AM
Well irregardless, I'm betting the use of 'mazer' will inkribitz as mead becomes more, like, gynormous.
(Oh gawd, I feel like I need to shower! ;) )

GntlKnigt1
12-01-2014, 03:43 AM
EJM3, I actually followed that one. LOL

kuri
12-01-2014, 04:21 AM
Well irregardless, I'm betting the use of 'mazer' will inkribitz as mead becomes more, like, gynormous.)

i.e. "mazer" will become cromulent as a synonym for meadist.

kudapucat
12-01-2014, 07:46 AM
Meadher or meader (but the d is a thorn)

Mazer will only become language to be synonymous if enough ppl use it descriptively.
If we linguistic prescriptivists band together, and dissuade the masses from using it incorrectly, the language will not evolve to accept it.

kudapucat
12-01-2014, 07:47 AM
That was not so eloquent as I'd have liked, but I'm onto my second cyser.

mannye
12-01-2014, 08:42 AM
I'm with you. I'm annoyed when people say things like "in second place" when we all know it's "secondly." Even things like kids calling N.O.S. "Nos" instead of saying the initials bothers the hell out of me. Anyone who put nitrous on a car in the 1980s will understand why that is unacceptable.

I say we do some research and try to find out what was used back when mead was more popular.


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
U g

kudapucat
12-01-2014, 03:55 PM
Now you're sounding like a member of the Society for Creative Anachronism... ;-)

mannye
12-01-2014, 05:33 PM
I was told I was a member of the Foundation for Undermining Creative Knowledge once.

GntlKnigt1
12-01-2014, 05:46 PM
I was going to join the Procrastinating Society, but never got around to it.

joemirando
12-01-2014, 07:13 PM
I'm employed at the Department of Redundancy Department

RachmaelBenApplebaum
12-01-2014, 08:47 PM
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Mazer

There are no words

kudapucat
12-01-2014, 09:12 PM
I feared I would regret following that link.
Pretty tame for urban dictionary.
"hippie skank sad clown" is not a name I'd like to go by though, so, standing my my linguistic prescriptivism.
And my linguistic anachronism.

FWIW, how many Scadians are meadhers here?

EJM3
12-01-2014, 11:01 PM
I was gonna join the Sarcasm Society of America. Like I need them!

mannye
12-02-2014, 10:28 AM
Here's a recent article that calls us "meaders". It's also in quotes so the author obviously also has no idea.

I don't really mind being a "Meader".

http://www.jweekly.com/article/full/72665/rosh-hashanah-s.f.-mead-makers-brew-ancient-beverage/

Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
U g

kudapucat
12-02-2014, 05:49 PM
"No idea" yeah...
He calls 'apple pie mead' a varietal.
I'm thinking it's a variety...
I don't think that's the greatest article to bring to a language debate.

mannye
12-02-2014, 06:45 PM
hmmmm perhaps not. OK. so everything I can find online solidifies that "mazer" means cup. Thinking along those lines... how did a cup for mead become a mazer?

kudapucat
12-02-2014, 09:30 PM
It's from the Old English męser, which is from the French masere, which has Germanic roots.

Something about grain or vein.
Masern is the verb form, meaning 'to grain' or 'to vein'
I dunno, old language is weird.

Honeyhog
12-02-2014, 09:32 PM
I don't really mind being a "Meader".
I wouldn't mind a Rita meader maid. :p

mannye
12-03-2014, 02:34 AM
It's from the Old English męser, which is from the French masere, which has Germanic roots.

Something about grain or vein.
Masern is the verb form, meaning 'to grain' or 'to vein'
I dunno, old language is weird.

Sounds like masers could be like the english word macerate. To soak fruit (or waste away- ancient) which is kind of related to what is happening to fruit in mead.

These are good mysteries to solve.


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
U g

Medsen Fey
12-03-2014, 07:27 AM
Another term that some have used is MEATHIER.
I don't believe that the use of this will grow "astronomically." ;)

I typically use the term meadcrafter.

Hydromelier is one you could try.

Or maybe back to Latin
Honey - Mel
Crafter - Artis
MELIARTIS

kudapucat
12-03-2014, 08:19 AM
Personally I like Meažer, but I'm sure it won't catch on.

mannye
12-03-2014, 08:34 AM
How about meller ? I dont think it's in use.


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
U g

kudapucat
12-04-2014, 12:19 AM
As for mazer. I think this clearly shows the current usage is much more common, suggesting a popularity increase or a significant change in meaning.
(I'm voting for the latter)
http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/12/03/312d8260623af4b82af22b4eb85ee8a6.jpg

mannye
12-04-2014, 01:46 PM
I'm easily swayed as I prefer the way mazer sounds.

Mazzzzzzzeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrr

It's more woody than tinny. Aluminum. Tinny.


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
U g

skunkboy
12-04-2014, 02:38 PM
Caribou! Nibbling.... ooo....

mannye
12-09-2014, 08:56 AM
In case anyone is wtf we are on about:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-gwXJsWHupg&autoplay=1


Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
U g

EJM3
12-09-2014, 07:05 PM
ROFLMAO!! Love me some full Monty!! Great!

skunkboy
12-09-2014, 08:01 PM
One of their best skits...

mannye
12-09-2014, 08:55 PM
caribou gooooooone.

EJM3
12-09-2014, 09:46 PM
Long as he leaves some caribou slobber ;D