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View Full Version : Current Mead Making Techniques Article is up!



loveofrose
12-29-2014, 01:29 PM
I was asked to write an article series over at homebrewtalk.com. Below is the link for the first article in the series. It is an especially good read for those new to mead making.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/current-mead-making-techniques.html

Cheers!

Bray


Better brewing through science!

brentG
12-29-2014, 02:13 PM
"Depending on good/bad conditions, yeast may blow past published tolerance or stop before it's hit. I see the latter a lot because I keep my yeast happy!"

Wouldn't it be the former?

bmwr75
12-29-2014, 04:13 PM
Great article Bray!!

edblanford
12-29-2014, 04:26 PM
Excellent article! Keep up the good work, others really appreciate it I am sure, as I do!
I do have one question. You add the last nutrients at 2/3 sugar depletion, but most reading I have done indicates that yeast cannot assimilate nutrients after 1/2 sugar depletion? I know your meads work (I have made a number of BOMM, from one gallon to six gallons) but have tried the last addition on several and no last addition (only after lag and at 1/3 sugar depletion) on several others, with no discernible difference. Care to comment? I have been curious since I first read and tried the BOMM protocol.

loveofrose
12-29-2014, 05:05 PM
"Depending on good/bad conditions, yeast may blow past published tolerance or stop before it's hit. I see the latter a lot because I keep my yeast happy!"

Wouldn't it be the former?

Depends on how you look at it. The first scenario would have been a better way to put. Oh well. Something is always bound to go wrong!


Better brewing through science!

loveofrose
12-29-2014, 05:09 PM
... You add the last nutrients at 2/3 sugar depletion, but most reading I have done indicates that yeast cannot assimilate nutrients after 1/2 sugar depletion?...

The studies that suggest this were done in wine in the absence of K2CO3. As you know, mead is a different beast altogether. While I don't have any scientific data, empirically, I've found the last few gravity points to go very slowly without the last nutrient addition. This is even more true if you decide to step feed after it hits 1.000!


Better brewing through science!

edblanford
12-29-2014, 05:14 PM
Thanks Bray, makes sense actually, especially if step feeding to ABV tolerance.

ScottBehrens
12-29-2014, 07:36 PM
Thank you for writing & posting the link.

loveofrose
12-29-2014, 08:58 PM
Thanks all! I plan to write at least 3 more. Any suggestions?


Better brewing through science!

McJeff
12-30-2014, 11:30 AM
Good read TY! Do you not taking a starting PH before adding potassium or do you justautomatically add it?

curgoth
12-30-2014, 12:25 PM
Thanks for writing this!

Thoughts on stuff I'd like to see elaborated, based on my own interests and stuff I see asked here a lot:

* Alternative nutrients (dried fruit, bee pollen, etc.)
* Step-feeding
* Making a starter
* Carbonation of meads, both dry and sweet (though admittedly the beer makers probably have this one down for dry)

loveofrose
12-30-2014, 12:33 PM
Good read TY! Do you not taking a starting PH before adding potassium or do you justautomatically add it?

I just add it. It doesn't matter what the pH is. You still need to buffer because fermentation drives the pH down.


Better brewing through science!

McJeff
12-30-2014, 03:36 PM
I just add it. It doesn't matter what the pH is. You still need to buffer because fermentation drives the pH down.


Better brewing through science!

Interesting! I've got a few batches I'm goin to start this weekend I'll add it to my process if my local hbs has some.

Is that 1/4 tsp per gallon or only 1/4 tsp?

loveofrose
12-30-2014, 03:47 PM
1/4 tsp per gallon. I double it in really tart melomels or cysers.


Better brewing through science!

brentG
12-30-2014, 03:54 PM
I second the alternative nutrients. I think there's a natural, "chemical free" interest out there. I went to a meadery last weekend and the owner was talking about a Whole Foods that wanted his meads but without chemicals, so there's definitely an audience.
I remember reading your thread on an all natural BOMM. That would make for a sweet article.

skunkboy
12-30-2014, 08:11 PM
Cool, thanks for pointing this out! :)

EJM3
12-30-2014, 08:57 PM
Super article!! With things like this to read I can add to my knowledge and step it up a bit as far as my methodologies go.

McJeff
01-01-2015, 12:08 PM
I just add it. It doesn't matter what the pH is. You still need to buffer because fermentation drives the pH down.


Better brewing through science!

If I was to use bicarbonate would I still us 1/4 tsp per gallon?

loveofrose
01-01-2015, 12:23 PM
Yes. They are interchangeable.


Better brewing through science!

Jim H
01-01-2015, 02:28 PM
LOR, loved the article, nicely done!

I also second the idea about writing an organic recipe. I haven't had the time to experiment with it myself (my only attempt last year yielded a very yeasty, bitter tasting mead that I thought was due to using too much Fermaid O, even a couple months sitting in secondary). If there is a best practice, I would like to know. And, is it incompatible with the BOMM method?

loveofrose
01-01-2015, 08:36 PM
There is really only three ways to do an all natural recipe while still adding nutrients. Two if you are picky about Fermaid O.

1. Boiled yeast for nutrients.
2. Fermaid O.
3. Add fruit. Traditional mead is out with this option.

In my post All Natural BOMM, I have some calculated values for what different fruits add as far as nutrients. Check that out as a starting point.

Yeast will be important here. You definitely don't want a nutrient hog and you better have a solid pitch rate to avoid problems.


Better brewing through science!

Medsen Fey
01-01-2015, 11:17 PM
There is really only three ways to do an all natural recipe while still adding nutrients. Two if you are picky about Fermaid O.

1. Boiled yeast for nutrients.
2. Fermaid O.
3. Add fruit. Traditional mead is out with this option.


There are others -Bee pollen, malt extract, and show mead strategies (such as large biomass pitch) are some examples.

WVMJack
01-02-2015, 03:54 AM
And whole hive with some drone larva included with the pollen and brood comb :) WVMJ

loveofrose
01-02-2015, 10:32 AM
There you have it. Medsen and Jack are far more qualified to write an all natural article.

I try to write about things I know and remain silent when I don't know! This is one of those silent times.


Better brewing through science!

WVMJack
01-02-2015, 03:10 PM
That was the way of the olden days before they invented fermaid, scoop out the skep, pile it all in a pot and cook it up, pour off the way, strain out whatever is left over and toss in some bread for yeast, old age all natural :) WVMJ

homoeccentricus
01-02-2015, 03:51 PM
Excellent article! Nothing really

homoeccentricus
01-02-2015, 03:57 PM
Excellent article! Nothing really
...that I didn't know but very nice to have at hand as a reference. And looking forward to the upcoming articles!

homoeccentricus
01-02-2015, 03:59 PM
Plus, I hate the latest version of tapatalk :-P

Medsen Fey
01-02-2015, 05:47 PM
Plus, I hate the latest version of tapatalk :-P
I'm with you.
It sucks.

Sent from my THINGAMAJIG with WHATCHAMACALLIT

mannye
01-04-2015, 04:51 AM
Thanks all! I plan to write at least 3 more. Any suggestions?


Better brewing through science!

Construction of a yeast bank.

mannye
01-04-2015, 04:52 AM
I'm with you.
It sucks.

Sent from my THINGAMAJIG with WHATCHAMACALLIT

Oh my YES!

Why did they have to fool with it?