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McJeff
01-03-2015, 06:51 PM
Anyone scrap off the foam and just use the left over honey?

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WVMJack
01-03-2015, 08:59 PM
SOP to scrape off the foam. Why are you boiling your honey? WVMJ

McJeff
01-03-2015, 09:29 PM
Was cooking it down to make a bouchet.

Last time I cooked it down I just left the foam.

WVMJack
01-04-2015, 10:21 AM
In that case skip the skimming the foam, when it cools you can filther out the chunks of proteins. Did you read all the warnings about the honey foaming up etc especially when you add water back and it likes to try to explode out of the pan? WVMJ

Medsen Fey
01-04-2015, 10:43 AM
I've been wanting to test antifoam drops in a batch of boiling honey to see if they help keep the beast from erupting out of the pot.

McJeff
01-04-2015, 12:45 PM
I did a slow steady heating on med with a constant stir. Prob for 90+ mins. I waited a bit too long before skimming it started to stick together but I skimmed off most of the foam. I didn't reintroduce water till the honey was "touchable". This is a before and after of the wildflower honey.

1548

Chevette Girl
01-04-2015, 12:54 PM
Why do people skim off the foam if you're going to ferment it (and hence create MORE foam) anyway? If you're bottling it, sure, foam looks nasty, but if you're fermenting it? Even the old boil-your-honey mead recipes I have read always say to skim off the foam. I never saw the point (well, unless it's full of beeswax, but normal filtered honey still makes harmless foam)... if it's an impurity, it'll settle out with everything else after fermentation...

McJeff
01-04-2015, 01:01 PM
The last time I did this I didn't skim the foam and thought it tasted fine.

So I'll be curious of th answer myself.

WVMJack
01-04-2015, 02:32 PM
In the olden olden days wax, bee parts, skep fuzz, the impurities float to the top and are skimmed off, just like making good stock you skim the junk off of the top. When we did a Bochet we didnt skim, most of the proteins coagulated and chunked up so they were easy to remove. There is boiling your honey to make a regular mead and then burning it to make a Bochet, two different things we seem to be talking about. WVMJ

McJeff
01-04-2015, 02:54 PM
Right and I wonder if I really burnt the honey as much as I could have. After an hour and half in the kitchen my gf was rdy for me to be out of it.

Crowing
01-04-2015, 03:06 PM
I'm way too new to worry about a bochet currently, but it's high on my list.
I would have definitely taken it much further down, your finished product there post-boil looks like the local wildflower honey I get so I would want to get mine much darker

McJeff
01-04-2015, 04:24 PM
It started out as dark wildflower honey ;)

EJM3
01-04-2015, 07:26 PM
After an hour and a half in the kitchen I would need to get me out! I'd like to try a small scale bochet, but the time cooking it seems more than I can handle...

Did you get some caramel/toffee/marshmallow like flavors out of it??

McJeff
01-04-2015, 07:58 PM
Toasted marshmallow? Def a creaminess to it.

Medsen Fey
01-04-2015, 08:11 PM
Cooking honey definitely gives caramel and toffee flavors.

McJeff
01-04-2015, 08:30 PM
I only had it on med for 90 mins, wonder how much longer I could have gone if I wasn't kicked outa the kitchen. Was afraid to put it on high and have it boil over. Do you actually burn burn it?

Dragonheart
01-06-2015, 12:40 AM
do you typically use more honey when cooking it down for a bochet? Since your losing some honey im assuming. Like lets say you need 3 1/2 lbs but if your cooking it down, would you up to maybe 4lbs?

EJM3
01-06-2015, 01:11 AM
I only had it on med for 90 mins, wonder how much longer I could have gone if I wasn't kicked outa the kitchen. Was afraid to put it on high and have it boil over. Do you actually burn burn it?

Just like any sugar mixture you can burn burn it, to the point of having a very unhappy SWMBO sending you out to but another pot.


do you typically use more honey when cooking it down for a bochet? Since you're losing some honey im assuming. Like lets say you need 3 1/2 lbs but if your cooking it down, would you up to maybe 4lbs?

I would have to say no because you still have the same amount of sugars present, just different types of them now. Any volumetric differences would be due to water loss in the honey on it's way to becoming highly camelized. The lost water would be added back when you have to dilute it back down to make the must.

I used to make candy with my mother so learned a bit about making candies and mistakes (had to buy a new pot once due to lack of attention for a couple of minutes).

Dragonheart
01-06-2015, 03:19 AM
hmm ok, thanks. Was just wondering about that. Will be a little bit before I try one, but just something I was wondering while doing some reading on recipes and such.

joemirando
01-08-2015, 09:28 PM
Also, once it's cooled a bit, dissolving what's left in the pot with a little water and adding it to the must minimizes losses. It's remarkably benign if you dissolve it instead of trying to chip, scrape or scour it out.

EJM3
01-09-2015, 05:58 PM
Yeah, think of candy, you heat a bit and it makes caramel, fudge and the like, heat it more you get nougat, heat it still more you get butterscotch, and still more to get you to "toffee" & "lollipop", anymore than that it will char, possibly sticking to the pan in ways that make you go out shopping for SWMBO's.

Now the problem is getting that 300F sugar mixture out of the pan, fairly easy for candy as any remainder cracks off. But you want all of it in a nice liquid form, so you add water back into the mixture VERY SLOWLY as 300 is way above boiling, so you have to go slow at first adding a little water at a time (or it CAN explode if you just dump the water in) until you have a pourable syrup. The high heat and long cooking time remove all the moisture from the sugar (or honey) mixture. Unless you just want to make a bunch of honey candies, nothing wrong with that either... ;D