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bwalker187
04-07-2015, 01:58 PM
Hi! Can anyone tell me how the addition of whole fruit will affect the OG reading in a melomel? I would assume that the OG reading won't take into account the sugar that is in the fruit itself. I also read somewhere that the fruit will release water, which will also affect the gravity reading.

McJeff
04-07-2015, 06:27 PM
All diff have diff amounts of sugar. If you play are d it's the mead calculator it will get you pretty close.

Irigoite
04-07-2015, 08:18 PM
Is Mead Calculator not working or its just me?

bwalker187
04-08-2015, 07:59 AM
Nothing happens when I try to load it.

wayneb
04-08-2015, 10:14 AM
It appears to be down. It isn't loading either through Firefox or IE. This looks like a job for Oskaar! :)

Chevette Girl
04-08-2015, 10:14 AM
I'ts not been down that long, it was working a few weeks ago when I asked Vicki about it, maybe it's a work in progress thing :)

I mash my fruit, put it in a fruit bag, and let it sit in the must for 24 hours with pectinase, at that point it's released a lot of the juice so the SG is reasonably accurate.

For me, apple and pear juices end up with a SG of something like 1.050, other juices from comparably sweet fruits are probably in the same ballpark but you might be able to get more accurate estimates if you look it up, then you just have to estimate approximately how much juice your whole friut would give.

EbonHawk
04-08-2015, 10:15 AM
Is Mead Calculator not working or its just me?

Doesn't work for me either. Can't even load the page no matter how many times I try. Assuming it's this URL you're talking about...
http://www.gotmead.com/2014-04-16-20-10-09/mead-calculator.html

It's just a BLANK page for me.

McJeff
04-08-2015, 02:28 PM
Mirror site...

http://meadcalc.freevar.com/

fubarstyle89
04-08-2015, 02:42 PM
Hey guys I have made a total of 8 gallons of mead using the basic mead recipe ie 3lbs honey yeast water 1 box of raisins one orange now what I'm asking is what are the advantages of using a carboy a pose to a milk jug

Irigoite
04-08-2015, 03:30 PM
Doesn't work for me either. Can't even load the page no matter how many times I try. Assuming it's this URL you're talking about...
http://www.gotmead.com/2014-04-16-20-10-09/mead-calculator.html

It's just a BLANK page for me.

Yes EbonHawk that's the URL. A blank page por me too. I used Chrome and IE, just the same.

ostensibly
04-08-2015, 04:46 PM
fubar, maybe longevity and ease of cleaning? If you're talking about a plastic milk jug, I'm not sure they're tested for long-term storage so might give off flavors eventually. Just a couple of guesses really.

fubarstyle89
04-08-2015, 04:53 PM
Well u see i put them in there for no more then 4 weeks then transfer to grolsch bottles with my own air lock

fubarstyle89
04-08-2015, 04:54 PM
I'm just wondering why I should buy a carboy

EbonHawk
04-08-2015, 09:30 PM
I'm just wondering why I should buy a carboy
You don't have to, you can make it in whatever you have and what's handy. Just clean it really good, and try not to introduce any scratches in the plastic as long as you can. That was the problem for me, eventually plastic will start to contaminate your brews. It's fine for awhile, but microscopic scratches can harbor some pretty nasty bacteria that will ruin your batches. I found out the hard way. The white food grade plastic seems to hold up a lot better than soda bottles and milk jugs. Just a warning.

Irigoite
04-09-2015, 01:27 PM
Hi! Can anyone tell me how the addition of whole fruit will affect the OG reading in a melomel? I would assume that the OG reading won't take into account the sugar that is in the fruit itself. I also read somewhere that the fruit will release water, which will also affect the gravity reading.

Getting back to the original question, bwalker187 has made a good point. Even with the mead calculator I am having some trouble to calculate the OG of a melomel I am doing.
The melomel has pineapple, coconut and pitaia at primary fermentation and the fruits were cut in cubes. The two last ones have no data at mead calculator and my OG without the fruits were 1.116. No idea what to do.

Chevette Girl
04-10-2015, 05:59 PM
If the alcohol % is that important to you after the fact, you can also do a spirit indication test, where you take a sample of known volume and known SG, boil the alcohol out of it, bring it back up to the exact volume you started with with water (known SG=1.000) and then check the SG difference, which based on the known SG of ethanol can tell you how much alcohol you boiled out of the original sample. I did this when I lost track of the math after step-feeding a batch several times.

Coconut doesn't have a lot of water or a lot of sugar so you can probably assume that's a wash. According to google, pitaia is dragonfruit... if the calculator doesn't have that in it, you might just have to guess, compare it to another fruit of similar water content and sweetness. They're ridiculously expensive here so I've never tossed one through the juicer, although I have a few I got on sale that I froze for future winemaking. If I end up making juice out of them before I ferment them, I will post the results, but it's not going to be for a while...

Chevette Girl
04-10-2015, 06:02 PM
I'm just wondering why I should buy a carboy

If you're only aging for 4 weeks before you bottle then I wouldn't bother. But if you ever want to age something a little more long-term, that's why you might want to invest in a carboy.

I never used milk jugs because I find I can never get the smell of milk out of them no matter what cleaning product I use, but I do quite frequently use water jugs and juice jugs when I run out of carboy space. I have used them for long-term aging but it's really not recommended, I'm pretty sure I've got at least one batch that's oxidized because it was in plastic instead of glass.

fubarstyle89
04-10-2015, 07:10 PM
Thanks for the tips

fubarstyle89
04-10-2015, 07:12 PM
Oh one more thing if I use fruit in my mead will it take longer to ferment

Irigoite
04-11-2015, 07:51 PM
If the alcohol % is that important to you after the fact, you can also do a spirit indication test, where you take a sample of known volume and known SG, boil the alcohol out of it, bring it back up to the exact volume you started with with water (known SG=1.000) and then check the SG difference, which based on the known SG of ethanol can tell you how much alcohol you boiled out of the original sample. I did this when I lost track of the math after step-feeding a batch several times.

Coconut doesn't have a lot of water or a lot of sugar so you can probably assume that's a wash. According to google, pitaia is dragonfruit... if the calculator doesn't have that in it, you might just have to guess, compare it to another fruit of similar water content and sweetness. They're ridiculously expensive here so I've never tossed one through the juicer, although I have a few I got on sale that I froze for future winemaking. If I end up making juice out of them before I ferment them, I will post the results, but it's not going to be for a while...

Impressive! Very good tips indeed. Yesterday I called a winery lab in a close town nearby and the guy agreed to use an ebulliometer and mesure the alcohol % for free!!!;) or almost...will cost a bottle afterall.
The pitaia i used has a pink flesh so the color of my mead is bright pink! The guy who sells me the honey also grows pitaia on his lands. Guess I am a lucky guy.

Chevette Girl
04-12-2015, 12:32 AM
Will it take longer to ferment if you use fruit... The definitive answer is: maybe.

There are so many factors that affect your ferment, the fruit can help sometimes (like being a buffer to prevent the pH from dropping too far or having some micronutrients a plain honey must might be missing) or hinder (takes some time for the yeast to break down the fruit enough to get all the sugars), so it's really difficult to predict what it will do. If I'm using fruit, I ferment on it and it takes as long as it takes.

The way I typically do my ferments (which includes yeast nutrients, yeast energizer, aeration and pH monitoring) usually the thing that causes one ferment to take longer than another ferment is the amount of honey. The higher the original gravity, the harder it is for the yeast to get going and do their job. For me, hydromels, even ones with fruit in them, tend to finish really quickly.

bwalker187
06-05-2015, 10:26 AM
Thanks for all the tips. The mead calculator doesn't seem to be working and I'm not sure why. I read the instructions for calculation the ABV with extra fruit, but nothing happens when I click calculate. Does anyone have any thoughts on what I'm doing wrong?

curgoth
06-06-2015, 10:47 AM
The mead calculator here is broken. Try this one (http://meadcalc.freevar.com/).

bwalker187
06-06-2015, 11:12 PM
The mead calculator here is broken. Try this one (http://meadcalc.freevar.com/).

Thank you!

bwalker187
08-25-2015, 11:29 AM
I'd like to revisit this topic because I'm still a bit confused. I am planning to make a batch of strawberry basil melomel. I used to mead calculator to give me an estimate of what the ABV will be, but I'm still not sure how to get an accurate OG reading (maybe I'm thinking about it wrong). The OG that I take will include the sugar from the honey, but not the whole strawberries, right? Is there any way to account for the sugar in the strawberries that will eventually be converted to alcohol when taking the OG reading?

bernardsmith
08-25-2015, 01:28 PM
One method is to check out the USDA's website where it lists the nutritional values of thousands of foods including fresh fruits (and so strawberries). I would think that if you go to that site
http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2430?fgcd=&manu=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=35&offset=&sort=&qlookup=strawberries
you could get a pretty good estimate of the sugar content of the strawberries you are adding and so it should be fairly easy to get a reasonable guestimate of the total starting gravity. (if you know the quantity of strawberries you divide it the portion size used by the USDA and so multiply the sugar content by the number of portions your batch makes up, then add that to the sugar content of your honey. Divide that number by the number of gallons of mead you are making. That will give you the number of lbs of sugar per gallon. Multiply that number by .040 to give you the starting gravity of your batch) -

To give you an example, if there is about 7 g of sugar in a cup of strawberries and you have 1 gallon of the fruit then if 2 C = 1 pint you have about 16 C of strawberries. 16 C of strawberries = 112 g (7 * 16) and 112 g = about 4 oz. Four oz of sugar in one gallon of mead will increase the gravity by 10 points. If you were making a mead (one gallon) with say, 3 lbs of honey, that would give you a gravity of about 1.120. With the added strawberries you could expect the gravity to rise to about 1.130.
(If you have 10 gallons of strawberries then you multiply the 4 oz by 10 and so on)

Second option might be to press a strawberry at random and extract a little juice and use a refractometer to measure the sugar content. You might press a few strawberries to see how typical the sugar content is.

A third possibility would be to freeze the fruit and then allow it to thaw with some added pectic enzyme to help break down the juice. If you then measure the gravity of that juice with your hydrometer (or use a refractometer if the quantity is very small) that should give you a fair idea of the quantity of sugar available from the fruit.

curgoth
08-26-2015, 10:20 AM
Steve Piatz's book has rough values for sugar content, and a formula for calculating the SG to start with to get the SG you want after adding fruit.