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EnricoPalazzo
06-11-2015, 05:18 PM
Hi,
I'm new here and new to making mead.
I'm not sure if this should go in "Ingredients" or "Mead Newbies" so I apologize in advance.

Like many, after some research I started making a gallon of JAOM.
(A few days ago)

Now I want to experiment with local available ingredients and fruits to make me some mead.

For my first exmperiment I want to try a JAOM mutant with Tamarind.

I don't want to just jump on it head first, so I'm doing some research to start with some kind of plan or recipe design.

What do you think of Tamarind for a mead?

Given it's nutrients, what should I look for to obtain the best from it?
For example it has a lot more sugar, magnesium and potassium than oranges, but it has less Vitamin C than oranges, etc.. So maybe I should add less raisins, some Citric acid, etc...
Here are the nutritional values of tamarind: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamarind

These are my current goals/conditions:


I'm aiming to have dry to semi-sweet results.
I don't like my alcohols to be too sweet.
I'll be using Fleischmann dry yeast.
I don't have access to a brewers shop (nor I can buy online) so I can't get my hands Nutrients, PH buffers, finning agents, etc. and none of the "fancy" wine or beer yeasts that's available for most of the people here.
The base fruit is Tamarind.
Other fruits, spices might be added if needed, for flavour, nutrients, etc.
The fermenting will be done at temperatures around 23-28C (73/82F).


Any pointers, advices or ideas?
Thanks.


Edit:
Added a local tamarind wine recipe ingredients that's supposed to be very good, although this source is known for liking sweeter wines.

1.87 pounds tamarind pulp
5 pounds of sugar
0.2 ounce of Sodium Bicarbonate
Water to fill 4 Gallons of waters.

Masbustelo
06-11-2015, 07:50 PM
Enter Tamarind Melomel in the search. I have one CoComing along nicely. Be sure you put the pulp in some type of bag?

Squatchy
06-12-2015, 12:51 AM
SO you have already not followed the recipe. In order for it to be a JOAM you have to follow the recipe to the tee. Everything about the success of that is each piece has a specific goal and a specific reason to being part of the plan. When you choose to use sugar instead of honey it's not even a mead any more. You haven't told us about any of your protocol. I'm not certain because there isn't enough info to know for sure but I'm guessing it will turn out in a manner that will take a very long time ageing to become drinkable.

EnricoPalazzo
06-12-2015, 02:27 AM
I think I wasn't clear on my post.



I did the JAOM recipe exactly as Joe's text.

I haven't done anything else yet. So no protocols or anything.

I'm just researching a bit before I start.



I do know the basic difference between mead and wine. What I posted there is a common local recipe for a Tamarind wine, that might be of some use for designing a mead recipe.

Perhaps someone with experience on fruit wines might translate the sugar amount to honey, or maybe the use of baking soda on the wine recipe might tell something about the fruit that will be of help for a mead recipe.

EnricoPalazzo
06-12-2015, 02:38 AM
Enter Tamarind Melomel in the search. I have one CoComing along nicely. Be sure you put the pulp in some type of bag?

Great. Thanks.
I'll go over your thread and ask you some questions there.

mannye
06-12-2015, 06:44 PM
There are plenty of tamarind devotees on here. A search will tun up many options. If you want to experiment with JAOM and tamarind, I would try using the secondary (aging) vessel to pour your finished JAOM onto a few pounds of fresh fruit.. This should imbue your mead with the flavor of the fruit. In my own experience, I would recommend against using cane sugar or even corn sugar to boost alcohol as it imparts a flavor I just don't like. Some people use "cidery" to describe the resulting product, but I never understood that descriptor. I personally wouldn't mind that. It's more like "nasty" IMO. But hey, that's just my opinion. What isn't opinion is that too much corn sugar or white sugar (and 5 pounds is WAY too much) will result in a thin watery product. I wold switch the amounts around at least, making it much more tamarind pulp than sugar.

EnricoPalazzo
06-12-2015, 07:30 PM
There are plenty of tamarind devotees on here. A search will tun up many options.
Yes, thanks. I did a more thorough search and found a few interesting posts about tamarind and I'm reading into them.




In my own experience, I would recommend against using cane sugar or even corn sugar to boost alcohol as it imparts a flavor I just don't like. Some people use "cidery" to describe the resulting product, but I never understood that descriptor. I personally wouldn't mind that. It's more like "nasty" IMO. But hey, that's just my opinion. What isn't opinion is that too much corn sugar or white sugar (and 5 pounds is WAY too much) will result in a thin watery product. I wold switch the amounts around at least, making it much more tamarind pulp than sugar.

To explain myself better, I'm not going to use sugar. I'll be making melomel, with only honey and fruits.
That recipe I posted is just an example of the ingredients used in a local tamarind wine (no honey involved) that might have been of some help to get amounts correctly for a mead.

Now, are you saying that you think that 5 pounds of sugar are too much for a tamarind wine (no honey added)? Or do you mean it's too much for a mead (adding on top of the honey amounts)?

I know that around here, most fruit wines are usually made to be very sweet and thick bodied, with around 18-20. Very much like heavy port wines.
I want to stay on the other side. Lighter and dryer.

On his thread, Masbustelo's recipe seems to be going in that direction so I'll be using it as a base for my "experiment".

mannye
06-12-2015, 09:48 PM
Yeah. When I made beer and wanted to cheat a little and get higher abv I would add a pound or less of corn sugar to the wort during the boil. Also if I thought the kit was too heavy, a pound of corn sugar gave a little boost of booze and lightened everything up. But more than that and the hotness and off flavors would show through. I used corn sugar for priming too but that was a cup of corn sugar dissolved in one cup of water to prime a full 5 gallon batch.

I would say that there is about an even amount of dry to sweet mead being made here with dry actually being the larger half if that makes sense.

I've got a traditional BOMM that's sitting at about .990 right now and is just getting better every month. If you're a dry guy like me, I would recommend the BOMM. It's a great way to transition into a more advanced mead but with a lot of the simplicity associated with JAOM. Plus BOMM is ready to drink even sooner than JAOM allowing you to learn faster and experiment more.


Sent from my TARDIS at the restaurant at the end of the universe while eating Phil.

Steve Works
12-16-2015, 09:33 AM
Both of them are fine.
Ingredients is just what it sounds like and the other one is more into the process.
_________________________________
Steve Works
Sweet champagne (http://www.canard-duchene.fr/en/champagne-authentic/authentic-demisec)

Mazer828
12-16-2015, 12:09 PM
I don't have access to a brewers shop (nor I can buy online) so I can't get my hands Nutrients, PH buffers, finning agents, etc. and none of the "fancy" wine or beer yeasts that's available for most of the people...

Just curious how it is that you find yourself in this particular situation.