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matthew.clarkson
10-15-2015, 07:51 PM
6 gallon batch of mead, started just over 2.5 weeks ago with a specific gravity equal to about 15% ABV, pitched 2 packets of lavlin D47 and added about 5 teaspoons of yeast nutrient. Stirred it up and let it rip...

It is fermenting, but slowly. Down to about 10% sugar remaining. Its consistently fermenting at about 2% ABV per week, which correct me if I am wrong, is pretty slow? Essentially no foam/head is being created, but there are many obvious small bubbles rising up.

The room is mostly in the upper 60s.

Do I need to add anything else? Oxygen by stirring?

Thanks!

PapaScout
10-15-2015, 09:06 PM
I'm not able to replicate your math. Can you provide the original reading and the reading now?

GntlKnigt1
10-15-2015, 10:47 PM
What yeast nutrient? DAP? Or is it something else? Actually, grams are more accurate than teaspoons, but give us what you have. Any idea on pH? Any sorbates sneak in?

Squatchy
10-16-2015, 10:10 AM
ARe you stirring/degassing? Did you do any of this at the beginning? How did you treat your yeast prior to pitch?

matthew.clarkson
10-17-2015, 03:02 PM
"Any idea on pH? Any sorbates sneak in?"

I have not measured. The yeast nutrient is some generic dried up yeast.

"ARe you stirring/degassing?"

No, should I be? I have received mixed opinions on this from friends. I did oxygenate quite a bit at the very beginning.

"How did you treat your yeast prior to pitch?"

By the instructions... mixed it in a little bit of slightly warm water - whatever temperature it said on the package is what I used.

Stasis
10-17-2015, 08:47 PM
- Ph is commonly a problem if some form of acid was added to the must. Either from acid blend or lemons... could still be a problem without these additions but I never personally had an issue with my recipes. Giving us a link to the recipe or writing it in a comment could help a lot.
-Aerating could be a problem depending on how long into fermentation you were aerating. If you started at a potential 15% abv and started this thread when there was a 10% more to go, you were at the 1/3 point of fermentation. This is called the 1/3 sugar break and it is recommended to aerate till this point. I.e you should ideally have been aerating up till when you posted the thread.
-Nutrients are a major issue in mead making. The majority of nutrients you typically find are dap based since they are intended for wine use. Dap supplies only nitrogen. Since honey is nutrient deficient,unlike grapes, you also need an assortment of minerals and vitamins. The majority of members here prefer to use fermaid-k. (Or fermaid-O). I'm not sure what you meant by generic yeast. Generic yeast energizer? Generic yeast hulls/ extract/ghosts?

So it seems we can only confirm that the yeast was rehydrated correctly (although using go-ferm would help even more). The rest of the answers are too vague. It seems reading the newbee guide might help you a lot. Give this a read unless you've read it already http://www.gotmead.com/forum/attachm...9&d=1395107076

matthew.clarkson
10-18-2015, 05:09 PM
"Giving us a link to the recipe or writing it in a comment could help a lot"

My flavoring will come later. At this point all thats in there is water, honey, yeast and generic yeast nutrient (the dried up old dead yeast). Should I have added some pectic enzyme? Or some other yeast nutrient?

I was not aerating at all. Should I, or shall I just let it progress slowly? Is there anything wrong with it going slowly, so long as it goes to near-completion eventually?

mannye
10-20-2015, 09:41 AM
Is there anything wrong with it going slowly, so long as it goes to near-completion eventually?

It depends. Is it going slowly because its malnourished or in a hostile environment? Then yeah. Is it because the temp is regulating fermentation rate of otherwise healthy yeast? Thats kind of the ideal situation that results in a good clean mead.

If i were a betting man, considering your description, i would bet on the former.

You should check the pH to make sure its at least 3.5 to 4 (but check for your specific yeast to be sure) and get some fermaid (you have time) and give it some food.


Sent from my TARDIS at the restaurant at the end of the universe while eating Phil.

Stasis
10-21-2015, 05:32 PM
Give this a read unless you've read it already

Seems I copied that link incorrectly. Here is the working link http://www.gotmead.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=1299&d=1395107076