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Squatchy
11-22-2015, 05:21 PM
I see people doing the re-hydration part of the equation the wrong way all the time. A huge percentage of post asking about "why my yeast are not fermenting" show proof that they started out from the very beginning. Maybe a administrator can sticky this at the top for people to refer to ?

Organic yeast rehydration nutrient



Go-Ferm is certified organic by OMRI. It is a natural yeast rehydration nutrient con*taining a balance of micronutrients. It was developed to enhance kinetics and thereby potentially avoid problem fermentations. Suspend Go-Ferm in the rehydration wa*ter before adding the selected active dried yeast culture. The yeast soak up the valuable bio-available micronu*trients as they rehydrate. Infusing yeast with these es*sential nutrients arms them against ethanol toxicity and optimizes nutrient availability to the rehydrating yeast culture. The result is fermentations that finish stronger.

Rehydration with Go-Ferm is effective for helping the yeast survive the fermentation. If these micronutrients were added directly to the must, competitive microor*ganisms would use a significant amount of them and others would be chelated by polyphenols or inactivated by SO2. Do not use nutrients containing ammonia salts, such as DAP, during yeast rehydration - they are toxic to the yeast at high levels.

To Use: Mix Go-Ferm in 20 times its weight in clean 43C(110F) water. For every 1 kg (2.2 lb) Go-Ferm, use approximately 5 gallons of water. Let the mixture cool to 40C(104F) then add the active dried yeast. Let stand for 20 minutes. Slowly (over 5 minutes) add equal amounts of must (juice) to be fermented to the yeast slurry. Watch the temperature difference. Do not allow more than 10C(18F) difference between the must (juice) and the yeast slurry. Atemperate as necessary.


If you are not going to use this product, please just add your dry yeast to 104 degrees tap water and let it sit for 20 minutes and then atemperate to with in 10 degrees and then pitch. DO NOT use anything else in your rehydration protocol. The dry cell membrane cannot differentiate between good or bad chemicals when it is absorbing moisture to rehydrate itself. So, it absorbs everything. This causes much harm and you end up with a crippled yeast cell that struggle to get across the finish line. They make fussels and other off flavors. May stall and give you a stuck fermentation.

Once the cell wall is hydrated it then can control what passes across the membrane and is no longer vulnerable.

pwizard
11-22-2015, 06:52 PM
I'm confused, are you saying to use 1kg for a 5-gallon batch or use 5 gallons of extra water to hydrate it? Either way that sounds like a lot!

How much for a 3-gallon batch?

Farmboyc
11-22-2015, 07:29 PM
He was saying that you need to add 20X the weight of water that you do GoFerm. The 1kg for 5gal water was just an example and probably more suited to an industrial scenario.

So for 1g of GoFerm you would use 20g or 20ml of water. Their should be more directions on the packaging.

WVMJack
11-22-2015, 07:54 PM
you forgot to add the yeast to GoFerm ratio

Squatchy
11-22-2015, 08:04 PM
To determine the amount of go-ferm multiply the amount of yeast you are going to prepare by 1.5. Then follow the instructions above

pwizard
11-22-2015, 08:51 PM
To determine the amount of go-ferm multiply the amount of yeast you are going to prepare by 1.5. Then follow the instructions above

OK, that makes a lot more sense.

ScottBehrens
11-23-2015, 05:08 AM
I think the ratio is 1.25 grams goferm per gram of yeast?

pwizard
11-23-2015, 08:35 AM
What happens if you accidentally add too much go-ferm? Not a huge overdose, but suppose you miss the ratio a little. What then?

Mazer828
11-23-2015, 10:04 AM
Here's an easy calculator squatchy shared with me in another post. Makes it pretty easy. Anyone with rudimentary understanding of spreadsheets could make it a little fancier.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/mkbx6iyw5kxyca5/lalvin%20goferm%20rehydrate.xls?dl=0

Squatchy
11-23-2015, 10:50 AM
Hey Kernel.

Now that you say that it reminds me that I think I have read both on Scotts laboratories web site. I wonder now if it's both. Depending on the OG perhaps. My mother is having sergury today so I won't be able to look around the web. Maybe I can do that at some other time :)

Squatchy
11-23-2015, 10:57 AM
So this is the copy/paste from their web site in totality



this is the first stage of your nutrient strategy. yeast rehydration
nutrients provide natural micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) to
the yeast during the yeast rehydration phase. if these micronutrients
were added directly to the juice, competitive microorganisms would
use a significant amount of them and others would be chelated by
polyphenols or inactivated by so2. by adding these bio-available
nutrients at the rehydration stage yeast cells benefit most directly.
cell viability and vitality is enhanced, resulting in fermentations
that finish stronger, with reduced chances of sensory deviations.
never use nutrients containing ammonia salts, such as dap, during
yeast rehydration—they are toxic to the yeast.


Yeast rehydration nutrient; OMRI listed
#15149 1 kg $35.20
#15135 2.5 kg $65.65
#15161 10 kg $216.40
Go-Ferm is a natural yeast rehydration nutrient containing a balance of
vitamins and minerals. It was developed to enhance fermentation kinetics
and to help avoid fermentation problems. By suspending Go-Ferm
in the rehydration water before adding the selected active dried yeast
culture, the yeast soak up the valuable bio-available micronutrients as
they rehydrate. Infusing yeast with these critical nutrients arms them
against ethanol toxicity and optimizes nutrient availability, protecting
and stimulating the yeast culture.
Recommended Dosage
30 g/hL 2.5 lb/1000 gal
Note: This recommendation is based on a yeast inoculum of 2 lb/1000gallons (25
g/hL). If using more or less yeast, respect the ratio of 1 part yeast to 1.25 Go-Ferm.
Usage
1. Mix Go-Ferm in 20 times its weight in clean 43C (110F) water.
For every 1 kg (2.2 lb) Go-Ferm, use approximately 5 gallons of water.
2. Let the mixture cool to 40C (104F) then add the selected active
dried yeast.
3. Let stand for 20 minutes.
4. Slowly (over 5 minutes) add equal amounts of juice to be fermented
to the yeast slurry. Do not allow more than 10C (18F) difference.
Atemperate as necessary (see page 5 for more details).
Storage
Dated expiration. Store in a cool and dry environment at 18C (65F).
Once opened, keep tightly sealed and dry.



If you are not going to use this product, please just add your dry yeast to 104 degrees tap water and let it sit for 20 minutes and then atemperate to with in 10 degrees and then pitch. DO NOT use anything else in your rehydration protocol. The dry cell membrane cannot differentiate between good or bad chemicals when it is absorbing moisture to rehydrate itself. So, it absorbs everything. This causes much harm and you end up with a crippled yeast cell that struggle to get across the finish line. They make fussels and other off flavors. May stall and give you a stuck fermentation.

Once the cell wall is hydrated it then can control what passes across the membrane and is no longer vulnerable.

Copied from Gotmead.com - Read More at:http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php/25211-This-is-how-to-rehydrate-your-yeast