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bwalker187
01-25-2016, 02:47 PM
I'm following an Elderberry mead recipe that calls for acid blend to go into the primary fermenter. I've got everything in the bucket and just realized that I ordered citric acid instead of the blend. I don't have a home brew store close by, so I'm wondering if I should substitute the citric acid in one for one, leave it out entirely or something in between. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Farmboyc
01-25-2016, 02:55 PM
Generally around here it is considered a no-no to put any type of acid up front.
It should be used after fermentation to avoid sluggish ferments.

Stasis
01-25-2016, 02:58 PM
I think meads rarely, if ever, need acid added to primary. I would keep the acid and only add any of it to an aging/aged mead to balance taste. I haven't yet needed acid for balancing, but having some on hand could be... handy ;)

bwalker187
01-25-2016, 03:07 PM
I have never added it to other meads that I've made, but I am definitely still a newb. I'll leave it out and see how it goes.

bmwr75
01-25-2016, 05:22 PM
What everybody else said, just forget about adding acid.

brentG
01-25-2016, 05:26 PM
I stopped using acid in the 90s, way before I got into making mead...

Mazer828
01-25-2016, 05:47 PM
Another note about acids is to tailor your acid additions to complement what you are making. For instance, if you're making wine, grapes naturally produce tartaric acid, so to balance the flavor, a tartaric acid addition would be appropriate. Same goes for malic acid with apples (or apple juice). Citric acid tends to add a candy-like quality, like fruit loops or some other audacious fruit cereal. Not what I would choose to add to a mead, but it may be suitable for a citrus based mead, or one made from OB honey. To each his own.

Acid blends contain all three, and good luck finding out the ratio. So why add an acid blend? Heaven knows. And why add it up front, even if a recipe calls for it? Again, no logical reason I can think of. Save acids for later, to balance flavor.