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jflanigan244
07-19-2016, 12:43 PM
I apologize advance, as I'm sure these are common questions...

But I am wondering: for a 5 gallon batch of BOMM traditional, the recipe says to have the starter on a stir plate. What is a stir plate? I'm not familiar. And if alternatively, I made a gallon BOMM and pitched it into a four gallon batch, would I use the measurements/recipe for the one gallon batch, or use the instructions for making the starter for a 5 gallon batch? [For making the starter gallon]

Do homebrew stores generally carry the required potassium carbonate or is that something I'd have to specially order? Amazon?

I understand I can follow tosna calculations to see how much nutrient to add if using fermaid o but is there an equation for figuring out when the 2/3 & 1/3 sugar break are?

Lastly, is it advisable to order 1388 and have it shipped into You? I know how temperamental the yeasties can be with temperature change, so I wasn't sure if you all had experienced a decrease in yeast viability when ordering yeast as such?

Thank you for any help and sorry for my noobness ��

darigoni
07-19-2016, 01:30 PM
I recently purchased a pack of 1388 off of Amazon (it actually came from Midwest Brewing) and it was shipped with a cold pack. It was during a hot spell, the cold pack was totally thawed, but the yeast seemed none to worse for their travels. That being said, I don't think I would push it beyond 2 day shipping. Also, as an FYI, at the time it cost me $12+ for the 1388, whether I paid for the shipping or if shipping was free (included in the price). I just checked out my local brew supply store and they were selling it for $6.99/pack.

As for sugar breaks. You'll need to measure you starting gravity with a hydrometer. They typical SG for a standard BOMM is approx. 1.099. Take the number to the right of the decimal place and divide it by 3 (i.e. .099/3 = .033). So, 1.033 will be your 1/3 sugar break. Your 2/3 break will be 1.066 (i.e. 2 X .033).

dave

Stasis
07-19-2016, 03:20 PM
Actually, the 1/3 sugar break is when 1/3 of sugars are depleted. Therefore, in this case the 1/3 sugar break is when the SG is 1.066 and the 2/3 sugar break is when the SG is 1.033

darigoni
07-20-2016, 08:24 AM
Someone correct me if I'm wrong. A stir plate is (usually) a tool used in the lab environment. It involves putting a small magnetic rod in your starter, then placing it on the plate, which then rotates the rod through magnetic induction:

http://www.northernbrewer.com/maelstrom-stir-plate

Nothing wrong with using a starter for your four gallon batch, as it will get your yeast a great head start. Just make sure you compensate for the for the space that the starter will displace.

From my experience, and for our use, Potassium Bicarbonate.

Have you checked out Bray Denard's (the B in BOMM) website? Some great articles on techniques and starters, along with his recipes.

https://denardbrewing.com/

dave

darigoni
07-20-2016, 08:27 AM
Meant to say that:

From my experience, and for our use, Potassium Bicarbonate can be used in place of Potassium Carbonate, and seems to be easier to find.

dave

jflanigan244
07-20-2016, 10:21 AM
Thank you! I think I have a much better idea of what to do now.
Yeah, I've done some reading on his sure and it's very interesting, he just tends to call for some equipment I don't have access to lol.

So, if I made a gallon start, so I have to match it's gravity with that of the must I will pour it into?
And should I use more nutrient when I pitch it into the bigger batch or just use the upfront nutrient additions from the starter?
Hoping the local brew store has some kind of potassium bicarbonate!

darigoni
07-20-2016, 11:39 AM
A gallon starter may be a little excessive. You're borderline whether you even need a starter anyway, as the 388 yeast pack is probably good up to 5 gallons. You just can't go wrong priming it for success.

Did you read Brays article about starters?

https://denardbrewing.com/blog/post/Start/

Looks like he's suggesting a 2 liter starter (1/2 gallon).

FYI. I know Amazon has potassium bicarbonate, as that where I got mine.

dave

Squatchy
07-20-2016, 12:43 PM
You would be wise if you did make a starter for a 5 gallon batch. Your lag time would be pretty long and you will give the yeast a better shot starting off with a higher cell count.

darigoni
07-20-2016, 02:49 PM
What Squatchy said. I was thinking you were making a 4 gallon batch.......

jflanigan244
07-20-2016, 04:34 PM
Oh, sorry for any confusion. I meant making a gallon starter for a 5 gallon batch. So I'd add it to 4 gallons of water and the honey.

I suppose I could just follow his protocol for the normal starter for a 5 gallon batch and just manually stir the starter whenever I have the chance?

I'm just pretty confused since I was just getting used to normal wine yeast/dry yeast methods but using a 1388 smack pack seems a lot different.

If I do attempt this but my starter fails to kick off the must, could I just prime some more 1388 with go ferm and re pitch?

I suppose I'm reading too much into it, as I've never had a failed ferment. I've had them not go exactly as hoped but they always get to work.

Squatchy
07-20-2016, 11:58 PM
It would work just as well to pitch your smack pack into a gallon of must. Let it ferment a couple days and then pitch that into your larger container. Make sure you're aware of your temperature requirements so you don't shock your yeast. Don't mix up all of it and let the bigger just sit. You'll be full of bad guys long before you add the single gallon.

jflanigan244
07-21-2016, 12:31 PM
Thanks, everyone!

I think I have it all figured out now! Turns out the local brew store does carry potassium carbonate :)

But figuring I use about ~2.5 lbs honey in a gallon start to achieve an sg of ~1.99, how much honey would it take to match that in the remaining four gallons? 12 lbs?

Also I'm assuming it's always preferable to use fermaid O over K?

djsxxx
07-21-2016, 03:55 PM
Thanks, everyone!

I think I have it all figured out now! Turns out the local brew store does carry potassium carbonate :)

But figuring I use about ~2.5 lbs honey in a gallon start to achieve an sg of ~1.99, how much honey would it take to match that in the remaining four gallons? 12 lbs?

Also I'm assuming it's always preferable to use fermaid O over K?
Check out the gotmead calculator - http://gotmead.com/blog/the-mead-calculator

Punch in 4 gallons, tick the box. Tick additional honey 1 then play around with the amount of honey until OG reads what you want it too.

Also, regarding O over K... Most of the BOMMs have a strict DAP/K feeding plan... I would suggest sticking to it for best results.

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