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NightWolf
05-06-2017, 09:27 AM
Newbie here, starting my second batch. I won't detail my first as I dove in too quick before researching as I should have. :p
I would love comments, correction etc on the plan before I start it.
The plan for a 1 Gallon semi-sweet Show Mead @17-18 ABV:

Yeast Slurry:
* 3.125g Go-Ferm into 17ml of water @ 110degrees
* Cool to 104 and add 2.5g of Lavlin EC-1118
*sit for 15 mins, then stir in 17ml of Must
*sit for 15 mins before adding to Must

MUST:
*1/4 gal H2O into plastic 2 gal fermenter
* Stir in 3.8 lbs of Orange Blossom Honey
* Add remaining H2O to reach 1 Gal. Stir/Aerate- Target starting SG to 1.140
*Add 1/2 tsp Fermaid-K, 1/4 tsp DAP - Stir/Aerate
*Pitch Yeast Slurrry - Stir/Aerate

LAG:
*2-4 hrs as needed - then additional 1/2 tsp Fermaid-K and 1/4 tsp DAP - Aerate

Ferm Management:
*24 hrs - 1/2 tsp Fermaid-K and 1/4 tsp DAP - Aerate/Degas
*48 hrs - 1/2 tsp Fermaid-K - Aerate/Degas (1/3 sugar break?)
*72 hrs - 1/2 tsp Fermaid-K - Aerate/Degas (2/3 sugar break?) I will take SG readings at each point.
*Degas daily until fermentation completes.

From there, 1st rack 2-3 weeks in and manage based on observations from there.

Feedback greatly appreciated! ;)

caduseus
05-08-2017, 08:10 PM
Use TiOSNA- google it.
Don't bother using DAP

Squatchy
05-08-2017, 11:37 PM
How did you come up with 17 ml of water for your rehydration? It's 20 times the weight of Go-ferm. Use the whole 5 gram packet of yeast. Learn how to attemperate your yeast slurry to slowly bring your temps together so the slurry is the same temp as the must before pitch. Don't rack based on a time frame. What are you thionking you will gain by racking so soon?

1140 with Ec will make it bone dry. You'll need to add 20 more points of sugar half way into your ferment. Temp control at mid 60's will give you the best profile.

NightWolf
05-09-2017, 12:13 PM
Thanks for the replies. I'll Google TiOSNA and drop the DAP.

I'll double check the other calculations this evening but I did use the Meadmkr batch calculator when determining Go-Ferm and yeast amounts. This is going to be a 1 Gal batch.
I assumed that fermentation would be near complete at 3 weeks using the 1118?

I really appreciate the input. I'm going review everything and repost after modifications.

NightWolf
05-11-2017, 04:24 PM
How did you come up with 17 ml of water for your rehydration? It's 20 times the weight of Go-ferm. Use the whole 5 gram packet of yeast. Learn how to attemperate your yeast slurry to slowly bring your temps together so the slurry is the same temp as the must before pitch. Don't rack based on a time frame. What are you thionking you will gain by racking so soon?

1140 with Ec will make it bone dry. You'll need to add 20 more points of sugar half way into your ferment. Temp control at mid 60's will give you the best profile.


OK, I certainly had the go-ferm/water wrong. Thanks caduseus. Still unsure on the amount of yeast. Everything I have read suggests 2.5g, not 5g for a 1 gallon batch. Still soaking in all I read on TOSNA by Travis Blount-Elliot so this may change. Hoping to back away from a dry and target semi-sweet, so, here goes

Yeast Slurry:
* 3.75g Go-Ferm into 75ml of water @ 110degrees
* Cool to 104 and add 2.5g of Lavlin EC-1118
*sit for 15 mins, then stir in 75ml of Must
*sit for 15 mins before adding to Must ensuring must and slurry are within 5 degrees

MUST:
*1/4 gal H2O into plastic 2 gal fermenter
* Stir in 4.0 lbs of Orange Blossom Honey
* Add remaining H2O to reach 1 Gal. Stir/Aerate- Target starting SG to 1.13
*Add 1g Fermaid-K, - Stir/Aerate
*Pitch Yeast Slurrry - Stir/Aerate

LAG:
*2-4 hrs as needed - then additional .5g Fermaid-K and Aerate

Ferm Management:
*24 hrs - Aerate/Degas 2xs daily for first 3 days
1/3 sugar break - .5g Fermaid-K - Aerate/Degas
2/3 sugar break -.5g Fermaid-K - Aerate/Degas (I will take SG readings at each point.)

Dadux
05-11-2017, 05:06 PM
If you use TiOSNA and 1118 the ferment should be over in 1 week or 2 max.

NightWolf
05-13-2017, 09:25 PM
Test- My replies are days late :-(

This has been done. Please comment

Batch #2:
Yeast Slurry:
* 3.75g Go-Ferm into 75ml of water @ 110degrees
* Cool to 104 and add 5g of Lavlin EC-1118
*sit for 15 mins, then stir in 75ml of Must
*sit for 15 mins before adding to Must ensuring must and slurry are within 5 degrees

Pitch was with slurry and must at 72 deg each

MUST:
*1/4 gal H2O into plastic 2 gal fermenter
* Stir in 4.0 lbs of Orange Blossom Honey
* Add remaining H2O to reach 1 Gal. Stir/Aerate starting wasSG to 1.132
*Add .1g Fermaid-K, and .5g –Potasium Carbonate Stir/Aerate
*Pitch Yeast Slurrry - Stir/Aerate

Must SG:1.32 Brix: 31.1 ish

LAG:
*2-4 hrs as needed - then additional .5g Fermaid-K and Aerate
Ran about 4 hrs, but guessing 1 gallon in a 2 gallon fermenter took extra time b4 I saw it bubbling.

Ferm Management:
Today 24 hrs - Aerated/Degased .5 g ferm-K – SG at 1.124, PH 3.7

Next:
1/3 sugar break - .5g Fermaid-K - Aerate/Degas 2x daily I will take SG readings at each point.
2/3 sugar break -.5g Fermaid-K – Stir (I will take SG readings at each point.

Squatchy
05-13-2017, 11:18 PM
Ao a couple of things. Your amount of water for the goferm is 20 times the weight of goferm. So you need to weigh your goferm and then weigh your water. When attemperating, I usually add no more than 1/4 the amount of new must to slurry so it slowly gets used to the temps,pH, acidity, and gravity. Think of how a lot of people get into a cold pool. They slip in slowly and a little at a time. This is how we like to slid the yeast into the must.

All of the scientific research I have read (tons) have said to feed all of your food by the time you get to the 1/3 sugar break. Almost everyone I know does this with great results. Lots of people use TOSNA (meadmaderight.com) and that is designed to feed on a time frame and not by gravity points. It works great.

Lastly, if any of your YAN has DAP in it the yeast will no longer assimilate the DAP past the 9% abv. ( I do see you used Fermaid K. So I'm just saying ) So any in the must after this point does not get eaten and it will give your mead a chemical taste. I stopped using DAP 2 years ago and don't know of any reason to date that I would ever go back.

Your probably just fine using a buffer as a stop gap but I don't and never really find I need it. It's a misnomer that yeast will stop fermenting below 3.4. That's just not true. People say it over and over because they hear others say it but it's just not true. I have some on hand if I need to use it, but only if something stalls. I have made a couple hundred gallons and have never had anything stall on me and many times I go below 3.4 pH without a single problem. I even ferment under the recommended temps most of the time as well. And that should maybe make it more prone to crapping out.

NightWolf
05-14-2017, 08:31 AM
Thanks for all the good input Squatchy. I've added your points on the Go-Ferm to water ratio and better management of the initial blending (slower!) of the must/slurry to my notes for future meads. Dropping DAP for any future recipes.

I'm not 100% sure what you mean by using a buffer as a stop gap?

I'm going to aerate/degas this morning and later this evening. Will add 1 last .5g of Fermaid-K at the 1/3 break (SG 1.089) and fore go any additional YAN from there.

One last point I'm unsure on is fermentation time. Dadux says this will stop in a very short time. Does this affect taste, etc? Is there a specific target on duration?

The fermenter is bubbling nicely now at about 7 sec per gurgle. :-)

Thanks again very much for the input! I plan on working/tweaking these 1 Gal batches until I get it right!

Squatchy
05-14-2017, 08:54 AM
Don't concern yourself too much on the fermentation time. Good management is what's important. Most of you honey will usually get eaten in about 10 days or so and then it slows down a good bit. 2 weeks, plus or minus is normal. Some strains are slower. And the colder you run your temps the slower your batch will go. Slow is good.

Adding your potassium carbonate to control your pH from dropping too low is ok to do. But some would say to not add anything you don't need until you actually do need it. Counting bubbles really won't give you much info. Your airlock will bubble for weeks after the fermentation is over. So you really need to buy a hydrometer if you want to do well making mead.

NightWolf
05-14-2017, 10:01 AM
Don't concern yourself too much on the fermentation time. Good management is what's important. Most of you honey will usually get eaten in about 10 days or so and then it slows down a good bit. 2 weeks, plus or minus is normal. Some strains are slower. And the colder you run your temps the slower your batch will go. Slow is good.

Adding your potassium carbonate to control your pH from dropping too low is ok to do. But some would say to not add anything you don't need until you actually do need it. Counting bubbles really won't give you much info. Your airlock will bubble for weeks after the fermentation is over. So you really need to buy a hydrometer if you want to do well making mead.

Thanks again. Going to mve the fermenter to a cooler spot. Somewhere that's around 67-68 degrees. Will update with the next hydrometer reading this evening.

NightWolf
05-15-2017, 09:23 PM
Update:
Last night- SG @1.104, PH @ 3.1 - added approx .25g FermK, and approx .25g of Potassium Carbonite. Moved PH to 3.5. Degassed/Aerated
Tonight - SG @ 1.092, PH @ 3.4 - No additions, just degassed/aerated. Probably looking at my final add of FermK (.5g or slightly less) in the morning at 1/3rd break (1.089) and just degassing daily from there for the next. Then leave it be until target FG of 1.006

Squatchy
05-16-2017, 09:00 AM
pH swings happen earlier in the process. You would have been fine to not add the carb to raise the pH. It's not accurate what everyone say about pH stalls under 3.2 pH. It's just not true. It's misinformation.

Every mead is different, but, the higher the pH the further away from (best flavors) you go. I would suggest to not add the buffer unless you stall.

NightWolf
05-16-2017, 10:57 AM
Crap. Just finished the next maintenance and did add a wee bit of Pot-Carb before reading this. Moved it from 3.1 to 3.4 PH. Won't touch the pot carb anymore, unless as you say, it stalls. I seriously doubt this batch will stall.
Keeping the temp at around 65 degrees. Today the SG was at 1.085. Added less than .5g of Fermaid-K. Thinking this is last of that too. Aerated/degassed. Will switch to only daily degassing and get the hydro readings until target of 1.006 is reached.

NightWolf
05-18-2017, 10:55 AM
Still chugging along nicely. Yesterday I just gave it a quick stir. Didn't get hydo reading. Today I degassed/aerated and have an SG of 1.065 and PH at 3.3. Since I'm now past the 1/3 sugar break, I'm just going to let this run it's course for the next few days with occasional degassing/stirring and watching the SG.

NightWolf
05-23-2017, 05:03 PM
Ok, getting near to the end of fermentation. Have moved from an SG of 1.053 on Friday to 1.035 today. Broke my hydrometer in the sink on Sunday so had to buy more. Yes, I got 2 so that never happens again :-)
So I'm nearing decision time. Do I try to stop it at my target of 1.004-6 by cold crashing for a few days then racking onto a stabilizer solution of 1/8 tsp of metabisulfite and 1/2 tsp sorbate? Or should I let this go further? Guess the EC1118 is not gonna want to stop easily. If I let it go to .998 or so, I'm assuming it will become very dry, and I'd want to back sweeten at some point.
Comments and suggestions are much appreciated!!!!

Squatchy
05-23-2017, 05:30 PM
If it were me I would run it dry and then stabilize it. It's easier to accomplish if there is no food for the little ones to eat. Then once your stabilize you can add honey to your desired FG. This method is very reliable and exact. The other one is like shooting at a moving target in the dark.

NightWolf
05-29-2017, 07:50 PM
If it were me I would run it dry and then stabilize it. It's easier to accomplish if there is no food for the little ones to eat. Then once your stabilize you can add honey to your desired FG. This method is very reliable and exact. The other one is like shooting at a moving target in the dark.

Thank you and taking your advise Squatchy. Letting it run it's full course. I'm a little surprised that here on day 17 it's chewing down. I did have it at 64 degrees for a few days and may that slowed it? Here's how it's been going:

5/19: SG - 1.053 PH 3.4
5/25: SG - 1.044 PH 3.3
5/26: SG - 1.032 PH 3.3
5/29: SG - 1.018 PH 3.2

I have been degassing once daily expect for this weekend as I was away.

Dadux
05-29-2017, 08:12 PM
Thank you and taking your advise Squatchy. Letting it run it's full course. I'm a little surprised that here on day 17 it's chewing down. I did have it at 64 degrees for a few days and may that slowed it? Here's how it's been going:

5/19: SG - 1.053 PH 3.4
5/25: SG - 1.044 PH 3.3
5/26: SG - 1.032 PH 3.3
5/29: SG - 1.018 PH 3.2

I have been degassing once daily expect for this weekend as I was away.

Well hiya there.
Your long batch might be related to low and innadecuate nutrient additions.
It's still being discussed if adding nutrients past the 1/3 sugar break is good or if its better to add all of the nutrients before the 1/3.
Also i think you might be adding too little nutrients (i have not run the numbers but keep reading). Next time you'll be way better off using this formulas http://www.meadmaderight.com/tiosna--inorganic-.html
That being said, the added nutrients are better than anything so you might be safe. Longer fermentations dont mean worse ones. In fact with TOSNA and TiOSNA you get farily long ferments. You nutrients are better than nothing, but i still think its not the best you can do. So read that for next time :) . It might take you some time to understand everything. To help a bit, here is a brix-SG calculator that i use https://www.brewersfriend.com/brix-converter/
Let us know how this turns up!

Edit: you said something about TOSNA but you are using fermaid K wich is not organic but mix of organic and inorganic, and in both TOSNA and TiOSNA you add all the nutrients before the 1/3 and you dont add nutrients the first day so im not sure what you read. Anyway, meadmaderight is the TOSNA website so... refer to that in the future.

NightWolf
05-31-2017, 05:59 PM
Edit: you said something about TOSNA but you are using fermaid K wich is not organic but mix of organic and inorganic, and in both TOSNA and TiOSNA you add all the nutrients before the 1/3 and you dont add nutrients the first day so im not sure what you read. Anyway, meadmaderight is the TOSNA website so... refer to that in the future.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the input Dadux. I did err when I pitched by adding the nutrients right up front. I have read the links you supplied and updated my notes for the next go.
Today it's at SG 1.008. Took a taste and it was pretty good! From an amateur's pov anyway :-)

Squatchy
05-31-2017, 06:36 PM
To make this a little clearer for you: It's not so much waiting for 24 hours, as it is waiting until you see proof that the yeast have moved out of the lag phase and have begun converting things into alcohol. This is called "proof". I feed as soon as I see "proof that fermentation has begun. So in theory this could be in just a few hours. Or as long as a few days. I read quite often where people are concerned because their lag phase has lasted for several days. I would be concerned if lag took more than 8 hours. I feel it it takes longer than that you might have underpitched your amount of yeast. 2 grams a gallon is a good rule of thumb up until 1120. Higher than that would benefit from 3 grams a gallon or even more in some instances. ( I don't make single gallons anymore, or even 3 gallons for that matter) but if I were to make a gallon I still always used to use the entire packet of 5 grams anyway. I buy it in much larger amounts. I wouldn't try to store a partial packet of yeast. It's only a couple dollars anyway.

Most nebee's would benefit from using more yeast as is. Rehydration is the first place people start to make mistakes. It's very important to get your yeast off to a good start so learn how.

You won't find a single scientific article saying to feed past the 1/3 (first third) sugar break. Only lack of faith would urge someone to feed past this point. With Fermaid O you would be OK if you feed past the first break, but if you start out right there is no reason to if you are using dry wine yeast.

Dadux
05-31-2017, 07:14 PM
Hey Squatchy, so just to add some info, i read some stuff this past 3 days that actually indicates that the early bubbles of CO2 you see might not be the yeast out of the lag phase, but instead the yeast using the glycogen storage that they have when they are packaged (for those who dont know, glycogen is basically polymerized glucose that the cell storages to use in case of emergency). This means that the membrane is not yet ready to take sugars and nutrients from the must. Im not even sure there is much harm done when pitching nutrients at the same time than the yeast. But this points that the lag phase can be longer than just the 5 minutes you see it takes to form bubbles in some strains (I at least get proof of life with some strains while atemperating the yeast with some must before pitching). So if there was damage done by pitching nutrients earlier, maybe its best to hold your horses for a few hours, even if you see proof before pitching.

What i actually read was that during the lag phase, the cell uses the glycogen storage, but i remain doubtful if this is done aerobically or anaerobically. In any way, the result is CO2, so...

That said, i agree with Squatchy, its hard you have very very long lag phases. If you take days before seeing anything probably you pitched dead yeast (or killed it)/severely underpitched and the release of CO2 is so low that you cant just see it until it has reproduced a few times.

Apart from that, all of Squatchy's info is correct, follow his advice ;D

Squatchy
05-31-2017, 09:39 PM
I now realize there are two "proofs" and I use them both and failed to diferenciate the two. Yes we can see proof of life when we rehydrate our yeast. I see this very early on. (within minutes after rehydrating) and even more in earnest once I begin to attemperate with must. So you are correct. The glycogen that is stored on board a dry yeast will only last .5 hours before it's completely consumed. At least according to LLelemande. That's why they tell us to pitch within a half hour. This is also why we start the attemperation process using our must as well. We then begin to feed the yeast and need to begin this process within the 30 minutes.

In my above post I was talking about the changes we see once the yeast has been deployed. Things go silent for a while with no signs of life. And then, at a latter point we see the early stages of fermentation. You can see the very faintest beginnings by taking a flashlight and shining it onto the must. Super small bubbles can be seen rising to the surface. At the same time. If you look at the surface you will see the very small pricks in the meniscus if you look into the glare on the surface. From there it continues on until you see the full krouzen.

Personally I wait to feed my yeast until I have spotted proof they have moved into the growth phase. The idea here is to not feed any unwanted bad guys so they can't get a head start on the yeast biomass. Granted. If you follow good sanitization techniques you shouldn't have much/if any to worry about. The issue could become a problem if you have long lag times. And could possibly be even worse if you were to add fresh fruit and/or other things that carry a host of bad guys. I never add anything into the vessel until my mead has gotten to a full throttle state. Once it's at this point it's very hard to have anything survive the little ones pretending to be piranha's. I bet to micro biologist yeast must seem like wanna be Great White's.

I generally attemperate over a few hours and pitch late at night and wake up to an active biomass. I like it this way so I can use the early morning hours before heading off to the salt mines to feed my babies each day and to chart progress.

Dadux
06-01-2017, 06:14 AM
I now realize there are two "proofs" and I use them both and failed to diferenciate the two. Yes we can see proof of life when we rehydrate our yeast. I see this very early on. (within minutes after rehydrating) and even more in earnest once I begin to attemperate with must. So you are correct. The glycogen that is stored on board a dry yeast will only last .5 hours before it's completely consumed. At least according to LLelemande. That's why they tell us to pitch within a half hour. This is also why we start the attemperation process using our must as well. We then begin to feed the yeast and need to begin this process within the 30 minutes.

In my above post I was talking about the changes we see once the yeast has been deployed. Things go silent for a while with no signs of life. And then, at a latter point we see the early stages of fermentation. You can see the very faintest beginnings by taking a flashlight and shining it onto the must. Super small bubbles can be seen rising to the surface. At the same time. If you look at the surface you will see the very small pricks in the meniscus if you look into the glare on the surface. From there it continues on until you see the full krouzen.

Personally I wait to feed my yeast until I have spotted proof they have moved into the growth phase. The idea here is to not feed any unwanted bad guys so they can't get a head start on the yeast biomass. Granted. If you follow good sanitization techniques you shouldn't have much/if any to worry about. The issue could become a problem if you have long lag times. And could possibly be even worse if you were to add fresh fruit and/or other things that carry a host of bad guys. I never add anything into the vessel until my mead has gotten to a full throttle state. Once it's at this point it's very hard to have anything survive the little ones pretending to be piranha's. I bet to micro biologist yeast must seem like wanna be Great White's.

I generally attemperate over a few hours and pitch late at night and wake up to an active biomass. I like it this way so I can use the early morning hours before heading off to the salt mines to feed my babies each day and to chart progress.

Yeah that seems right. That half hour makes sense too

NightWolf
06-01-2017, 02:57 PM
Thank you both for so much invaluable information. "Who knew making good mead was so hard?" :confused:. I'm learning tons in a short time and up to about 14 pages of notes now with a lot changes in the past 2-3 weeks. The $30 spent on the patron access has been well worth it. I'll work this batch through and provide a few updates along the way. Going to sit down the weekend and plan out my next batch and put the plan in the Mead Log section. Much more reading to do!

Squatchy
06-03-2017, 05:13 PM
Thank you both for so much invaluable information. "Who knew making good mead was so hard?" :confused:. I'm learning tons in a short time and up to about 14 pages of notes now with a lot changes in the past 2-3 weeks. The $30 spent on the patron access has been well worth it. I'll work this batch through and provide a few updates along the way. Going to sit down the weekend and plan out my next batch and put the plan in the Mead Log section. Much more reading to do!

It's really not hard once you get through the very first few pieces that need to happen

NightWolf
06-04-2017, 07:13 AM
It's really not hard once you get through the very first few pieces that need to happen

Agreed. It was a tongue in cheek kinda remark, although sifting the good advise from the old out dated practices out there took some time. I've amassed 18 pages of notes and am now trimming them down based on what I've learned to be best practices.

Also have a L.D.Carlson Company Complete Oxygenation System and some Ferm-O (So I get TOSNA right this time.)on the way. Hopefully this will help. Again, thanks for all the help!

Squatchy
06-04-2017, 01:23 PM
Agreed. It was a tongue in cheek kinda remark, although sifting the good advise from the old out dated practices out there took some time. I've amassed 18 pages of notes and am now trimming them down based on what I've learned to be best practices.

Also have a L.D.Carlson Company Complete Oxygenation System and some Ferm-O (So I get TOSNA right this time.)on the way. Hopefully this will help. Again, thanks for all the help!

So rehydration with Go-ferm and temp control and you should be well on your way

NightWolf
06-09-2017, 10:05 AM
Just a quick update on progress. Stirred/degassed on each date noted below.
5/31 - SG @ 1.018
6/2 - SG @ 1.009
6/3-SG @ 1.006
6/4 - SG @ 1.004
6/6 - SG @ 1.002
6/9 - SG @ 1.000
PH has been holding around 3.2

At 17.32 abv now the alcohol is pretty noticeable but that was expected. Not very yeasty at all. The honey flavor is strong too though and what I was hoping for. Just about at 30 days now so I'll stir daily this weekend figuring it's only going get through about 2-3 more points.
After that, I'll stir every other day for about 3 weeks, then let it alone for 1-2 weeks before racking onto .25g P-Sorbateand a hair less of Metabysulfite.

Dadux
06-09-2017, 11:14 AM
Just a quick update on progress. Stirred/degassed on each date noted below.
5/31 - SG @ 1.018
6/2 - SG @ 1.009
6/3-SG @ 1.006
6/4 - SG @ 1.004
6/6 - SG @ 1.002
6/9 - SG @ 1.000
PH has been holding around 3.2

At 17.32 abv now the alcohol is pretty noticeable but that was expected. Not very yeasty at all. The honey flavor is strong too though and what I was hoping for. Just about at 30 days now so I'll stir daily this weekend figuring it's only going get through about 2-3 more points.
After that, I'll stir every other day for about 3 weeks, then let it alone for 1-2 weeks before racking onto .25g P-Sorbateand a hair less of Metabysulfite.

HAve you calculated the ammount of sorbate and Kmeta you need?
Are you looking to backsweeten? because at 17% ABV unless you backsweeten there is not much need for stabilizing

NightWolf
06-09-2017, 11:59 AM
HAve you calculated the ammount of sorbate and Kmeta you need?
Are you looking to backsweeten? because at 17% ABV unless you backsweeten there is not much need for stabilizing

Forget the source but it was here on GM that I copied this into my notes:
When a batch reaches the desired final SG, cold crash for several days,then rack onto sorbate/sulfite.I will rack it onto a stabilizer solution of 1/8 tsp of metabisulfite and 1/2 tsp sorbate PER GALLON,
But given the high ABV and that I doubt I will be back sweetening, this becomes academic I assume. I'll let it age out and clear on it's own. If it needs clearing help after time, I'll use the Super-Kleer to finish it up.

Dadux
06-09-2017, 12:30 PM
Forget the source but it was here on GM that I copied this into my notes:
When a batch reaches the desired final SG, cold crash for several days,then rack onto sorbate/sulfite.I will rack it onto a stabilizer solution of 1/8 tsp of metabisulfite and 1/2 tsp sorbate PER GALLON,
But given the high ABV and that I doubt I will be back sweetening, this becomes academic I assume. I'll let it age out and clear on it's own. If it needs clearing help after time, I'll use the Super-Kleer to finish it up.

There is not much need to use sorbate if not backsweetening. IF you desire you can do so, of course, but with good practices its hard you get anything contaminated at that ABV, and sorbate does not stop everything
If you want to give the mead some protection against oxidation feel free to add the K-meta, but keep in mind that ammount is protective but wont prevent refermentation in case you backsweeten.
Im just saying so its clear. Stabilizing is usefull if your ABV is low (11 or less can be infected by acetobacter) or if backsweetening. Anything else its just protective, and the Kmeta does most of the work there, both against oxigen and against other infections (well alcohol kills most things anyway).

NightWolf
06-09-2017, 02:56 PM
Thanks again Dadux. The pieces are starting to fall together in my head now.:cool: Not just the "whats", but the "why's too. :-)