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View Full Version : Has anyone made all three Joe's? I have questions about Pyment and Cyser.



philodice
05-07-2017, 11:59 PM
Joe's best known published recipe is his JAOM. However, he also has two other pitch and leave recipes.
I've named them the Joely Trinity. Ancient orange mead, pitch and leave pyment, and the Simple Cyser.

I have a JAOM working in the closet, clearing nicely. A Pitch & Leave Pyment blooping away in the brew cooler, but the cyser is short on details so I haven't pitched one yet. It is basically a gallon of apple juice, 8 ounces dark brown sugar, 8 ounces honey, lavin d47 pitch and leave, back sweeten with honey and bottle, should be sparkling.

I've heard good things about the pyment and the JAOM, but there is little information on the hard apple cider recipe.

Any thoughts?

gee117
05-08-2017, 02:06 AM
Ive made a similar cyser it turned out really nice b I used white suger not brown I'll post a picture tonight

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Squatchy
05-08-2017, 08:18 AM
If you use D47 you will need to keep it in the low 60's or it will make tons of off flavors

darigoni
05-08-2017, 08:36 AM
Where did you find the "Joely Trinity"?

Have you checked out this link: http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthread.php/21040-JAO-variants-The-recipes-thread/page4?highlight=jaom+variants

gee117
05-08-2017, 03:27 PM
The cyser I made https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170508/452e83814365f3ddeb9a3d988ac19fc0.jpg

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philodice
05-10-2017, 09:05 PM
The three Joe's I found:
Joe’s Ancient Orange Metheglin

•3-3.5 lbs Clover or your choice of honey
•1 large orange
•1 small handful raisins (25 if you count)
•1 stick cinnamon
•1 whole clove
•1 pinch nutmeg or allspice
•1 package Fleishmann’s bread yeast •water to 1 gallon
Instructions:
1. Use a clean 1 gallon carboy
2. Dissolve honey in some warm water and put into carboy.
3. Wash orange well to remove any pesticides and slice in 10 pieces. Do not remove rind. Do not jest.
4. Put in raisins, clove, cinnamon stick, any optional ingredients and fill to 3 inches from the top with tepid water. You can top off with more water after the first few days.
5. Shake the heck out of the jug with top on. This is your sophisticated aeration process.
6. Drop in 1 teaspoon of bread yeast. (No you don't have to rehydrate it first-- the ancients didn't even have that word in their vocabulary-- just put it in and give it a gentle swirl.)
7. Install water airlock. Put in a dark place. It will start working immediately or in an hour. After major foaming stops in a few days add some water and then keep your hands off it. Don't shake it!
Recipe Notes:
Racking --- Don't you dare
Additional feeding --- NO
More stirring or shaking -- You're not listening, don't touch.
After 2 months and maybe a few days it will slow down to a stop and clear all by itself. Then you can put a hose in with a small cloth filter on the end into the clear part and siphon off the golden nectar. If it is clear it is ready. You don't need a cold basement. It does better in a kitchen in the dark. It likes a little heat (70-80). It should finish sweet. If it didn't work out... you screwed up and didn't read my instructions.
Joe's Quick Grape Pyment

2 lbs Clover honey
1 oz buckwheat honey

64-oz Welch's Grape Juice with Vitamin C added- Make sure it has no preservatives other than Vitamin C
Lalvin EC-1118 Or Lalvin D47

Mix the honey in the grape juice. Add water to four inches from the top.
Aerate by shaking the bottle for at least 5 minutes.
Properly rehydrate and pitch yeast.

Install the airlock, then put the bottle in a dark place at 61 – 68 degrees. This recipe does not appreciate heat.

“This is the youngest best tasting, quick mead I have had thus far. Too bad It will ferment to dry (about 13% alcohol) because of type of yeast and all the nutrients and natural sugars in Welch's grape juice. It should be to SG =1.000 or less in 14- 21 days max.”

Rack to clean carboy over mixture of 6-oz honey, 6-oz Welch's grape juice, 1/2t of Sorbate and 1/2 crushed campden tablet. It will stabilize and clear fast. Let it clear and set for another 2 weeks and it will be ready to bottle and drink. It will be medium sweet but smooth and drinkable right away. If you want it semi sweet use 4-oz honey instead of 6-oz / gal. I used the Campden because using both Potassium Sorbate and Sulphite together will inhibit renewed fermentation. Color is deep red, has nice legs on sides of glass after swirling, good nose and great balanced taste.

Joe’s Pitch and Leave Hard Cider (not a mead)

1 gallon batch
1 gallon apple cider
8 oz Clover honey
8 oz dark brown sugar
Lavine d 47 or ec 1118 Champayne yeast

SG ~ 1.068 9% abv potential
Method: Pitch, Shake, Walk Away
Mix ingredients and aerate by shaking the bottle for at least 5 minutes.
Properly rehydrate and pitch yeast.

Install the airlock, then put the bottle in a dark place at 61 – 68 degrees. This recipe does not appreciate heat.

Rack around 14 days. SG 1.000
Clears in another 14 days.
Back sweeten with 2 oz Clover honey. Bottle. After four weeks the carbonation should be perfect. Do not over age to prevent bottle bombs.

There was some discussion about different yeasts for the Pyment and Cider, and how aging those up to three months improves the character of the beverage. Of course the two later recipes require temperature control, and thus are not as fool proof.

philodice
06-03-2017, 11:50 AM
It is time to update!
My by-the-recipe JAOM was pitched on 4-14-17. It will be two months old soon and it is slowly clearing, fruit dropping. It smells strongly of orange pith and sweetness, with some honey character. So, all is on track. While this works away in the closet, my other experiment was a raging success.

My Pitch and leave Pyment was pitched on 4-30-17. I took it from the brewing chamber to the refridgerator on day 26, racked on day 30, and it is clear now. Some of the bottles I racked it into are mysteriously empty. I have only one bottle left, and it is delicious. Clearly other people in the house approve of this recipe. It is more wonderful than I expected a one month pyment to be. I just pitched another.

Joe's easy Pyment. 06/03/17 One gallon.
1lb clover honey, 1lb white nepalese honey, 64oz welch's grape juice, Lavin k1-v1116 yeast (properly rehydrated) and water to the shoulders of the carboy. Active fermentation this morning!

I highly recommend that any new brewers pitch a gallon or two of the pyment to keep you busy while your other meads age.

Squatchy
06-03-2017, 05:19 PM
This one will also become miles better as it ages. If you learn the most modern practices you can make mead that will become drinkable way sooner than Joe's recipes. Use his ingredients and use the modern practices we now use and it will be way better ans much sooner.

philodice
06-04-2017, 11:47 PM
This one will also become miles better as it ages. If you learn the most modern practices you can make mead that will become drinkable way sooner than Joe's recipes. Use his ingredients and use the modern practices we now use and it will be way better ans much sooner.

I am learning the more modern practices as well. Right now this is about trying different things, and finding out what kind of mazer I want to be. I'm exploring if I want to be a pitch and leave type with an endless series of Joe's in my closet or a meticulous step feeding wizard. What's my comfort level? How complicated do I want to get? What's my style, and what does my family like? It's a fun journey. However my family is not being that helpful. They like the pyment, and they also like the one step fed success I have that is now aged six months with some peach/ginger flavors.
I might end up having to use many styles of mazing.

philodice
06-26-2017, 02:17 AM
Update: I have tasted my JAOM, right after racking. It cleared nicely and racking helped reduce the pith smell. On first taste, it is aggressively orange, like a punch in the nose, with clove notes and a bit of honey sweetness on the tongue. After chilling for a few days, my family all like this one. I just pitched another by the book JAOM. However, I did not count the raisins. I just added a tiny snack-box full of them. And I dropped an extra clove in. I also made sure the cinnamon stick was on the larger side, and the orange cut into more pieces for easier removal. Nothing too radical. I think the spirit of the Jaom will forgive me.
I plan on pitching another easy pyment soon. I'm starting an aging chamber that will be filled, one batch at a time, with the best of my results. I mean, if I like it now I'll like it more later. :)

I'm ready to try a cyser, it will most likely pitch tomorrow. I'm not sure I'll like cyser. I like cider, but I had a horrid experience with a (possibly 'corked') German Apfelwine that makes me hesitate to pitch my own.

Any thoughts on how apfelwine differs from cyser?
Help, please.

The brew cooler chamber is like a gift from the Gods of Mead. I really love it, and as the summer gets hotter here in Az, at 120+ in some areas of the city, rolling blackouts are caused by drawing too much energy from our utility grid. My blue ice packs have not failed.

Maylar
06-26-2017, 01:20 PM
I'm ready to try a cyser, it will most likely pitch tomorrow. I'm not sure I'll like cyser. I like cider, but I had a horrid experience with a (possibly 'corked') German Apfelwine that makes me hesitate to pitch my own.

Any thoughts on how apfelwine differs from cyser?
Help, please.



Apfelwein (if you follow EdWort's famous recipe) is apple juice bumped up with sugar to raise the ABV level. Typically 8.5% or so and dry / tart. Cysers are honey and cider fermented together, and technically a mead which means 50% or more of the fermentable sugar should come from the honey. I like them 50/50 which means they start at about 1.100 and finish at 13% or so, like mead or wine.

mannye
06-26-2017, 02:11 PM
Sounds to me like the only thing you need to do is make 5 gallon batches