PDA

View Full Version : Does anyone make vinegar?



Dmntd
07-25-2005, 06:05 PM
I started making vinegar a couple months ago, using the wine or mead thats left in a bottle. There's mother of vinegar covering the bottom of the jug it's made in, about 5 times the size it was when I got it.

Last week I added the last cup or so of a bottle of mead with about half as much water. A white film has formed, floating on top of the vinegar. it's the size and shape of the jug, when the jug is tipped the fiml holds its shape.

Any thoughts as to whats going on in there? or what this fiml is/might be?

Anthony

Norskersword
07-25-2005, 07:54 PM
I havn't made any vinegar but I was planning to try it soon and hopefully make a nice marinade from it.

I was planning to buy this book from More Beer, since it's so cheap, and give it a try.

http://www.morebeer.com/product.html?product_id=15868

Dmntd
07-25-2005, 08:07 PM
You're right Norsker,

The price is great and one can never have to may books.

Anthony

Miriam
07-26-2005, 01:16 AM
Anthony,

The white film is a new mother of vinegar. It will darken and thicken, then eventually drop to the bottom of the jar. You can lift it out with a sanitized spoon and use it to start a new batch of vinegar - or give it away - or compost it. As long as your vinegar has live bacteria in it, new mothers will occasionally form. If you want to stop this activity, you can remove any new mothers, put your bottle in a water bath, and pasteurize for 20 minutes or so.

A batch of wine or mead that goes sour (not rotten-smelling, just sour) will make great vinegar. Put into attractive bottles with a simple label, it makes gifts that everyone appreciates - even people who don't drink wine. So if you ever have too much vinegar, it won't go to waste.

I used to keep a vinegar jar going into which I would dump ends of bottles, and that made fine vinegar, but then last summer a batch of prickly pear wine went sour on me. That yielded enough vinegar to keep me going for a long time. Before that, I had raspberry vinegar from a similar sour wine. That was before I learned that in the summertime, I have to pitch yeast 12 hours after sulfiting (not 24), and keep my primaries out of the hot kitchen. :)

Miriam

Dmntd
07-26-2005, 09:24 AM
Thanks Miriam,

I has thickened and it sank this morning, but it is still white. Started the vinegar in a gallon jug, removing the new mother may be a bit of a task, thinking I should pour it into a bowl and start a batch in a wide mouth crock.

Anthony

Miriam
07-26-2005, 03:52 PM
Unless the mother bothers you, it's hardly worth removing it, for another will start forming soon. If you want to kill the bacterial activity, pasteurize it, and for the future keep a couple of mothers in the fridge, or in a separate jar. You have to refresh the jar with new fluid once in a while, is all.

And remember to keep everything very clean...maybe not the same fanatic way we treat wine, but jars and spoons freshly washed with very hot water and dish soap.

Miriam

Dmntd
07-26-2005, 03:59 PM
Thanks again Miriam,

Anthony

Miriam
07-26-2005, 05:43 PM
No hay de que.

Miriam

jab
07-26-2005, 09:58 PM
I have never understood this. I got my wife a mother because she always wanted to make her own vinegar. The problem is that I can't remember the last time we didn't finish off what ever we were drinking. I made some mead vinegar once but it wasn't with left overs, I just picked a bottle and decided that one was going to be vinegar.

Dmntd
07-27-2005, 09:29 AM
I have people over about every other month or so. Often there is a bottle that didn't get finished, or some left in glasses. When there is none left over, I simply add a little to the jug every other week or so.

I picked up a 2 1/2 gallon stoneware crock for making vinegar yesterday and plan to make a gallon batch for the crock.

Anthony

Miriam
07-27-2005, 10:19 AM
jab,

You can just pour a bottle of grape juice over the mother and it will become vinegar just fine. Or a bottle of apple juice, or any other natural, preservative-free juice that strikes your fancy. Never thought that prickly pear must would make good vinegar, but it's delicious.

Er, keep your jar covered with a towel or some layers of plastic wrap, of course. You may want to keep it in another room, not where your primaries are. I don't have enough room to keep all these things separate, so I keep the vinegar on top of the kitchen cabinets and so far (spitting three times - tfu, tfu, tfu) no must has been contaminated.

Some people insist on keeping two jars: one for white, one for red. Me, I just dump in any leftovers into one jar. People love my salad dressing!

Miriam

briankettering
07-27-2005, 11:02 AM
I've been making vinegars for about 6 years now, both for cooking and drinking. It is amazing how well a four-year-old cider vinegar can taste. ;D

The acetobacter like to live in an environment that is about 5% to 7% alcohol by volume. It also requires exposure to air to complete its conversion of alcohol to acetic acid.

I have a nice handout that I use in my vinegar-making class. PM me if you would like a copy emailed to you.

Brian K

Dmntd
08-16-2005, 09:32 PM
Couple more vinegar questions.

Every time I remove the towel to add mead to the vinegar crock a new mother has formed on the surface, pour the mead in it sinks, next time the same thing. The collection of MOV in the bottom of the crock is getting to be quite thick. Is there any reason not to let this collect in the bottom of the crock?

Whether I prime and bottle the braggot or not I plan on making at least one gallon of malt vinegar.

Everything I've read about vinegar making says to dillute the wine (mead in this case) to roughly 5% ABV, and to start out with not more then 2 cups of dillute wine, why is this, a few of these bugs can turn a magnum bottle of fine wine into vinegar. Why wouldn't a healthy MOV turn a gallon jug of braggot into vinegar?

The first batch of vinegar, is the best vinegar I've ever tasted. It's light pink in color, has a hint of honey in the aroma and the finish is honey sweet. Even after 3 filterings through doubled coffee filters a MOV formed on the surface in the bottle, been thinking when it's down to half full I'll add more mead to the bottle.

I've not been dilluting the mead before adding it to the crock, the result is stronger (more acidic) vinegar. I can hardly wait for the tupelo mead to finish so I can make a tupelo vinegar.

Anthony

Brewbear
08-17-2005, 02:09 AM
Hey all,
I use a sun tea jar for vinegar. Easy to add to it, use the spigot to get vinegar. I found some wine at the 99 cents store, hope it makes good vinegar 'cause it makes a lousy wine :-\
Using mead to make vinegar on purpose???? Isn't that a sin? You may make mead vinegar, but not intentionally :'( :'(

Ted

Miriam
08-17-2005, 04:02 AM
I think that once Anthony has enough vinegar, he'll go back to straight mead. But hey, it's whatever makes a person happy, yes?

Anthony, you can remove the MOVs and compost them, or save them with a little vinegar in a separate jar to give away, or just guiltily dump them. Kind of hard to dump something called "Mother" though :'(

To avoid formation of new MOVs, pasteurize your vinegar. Put the bottle in a water bath, and allow the water to simmer for 20 minutes or so. Let it cool down by itself or put the hot bottle on a towel so it won't shatter.

I've never diluted the wine - just poured it all over a MOV. I like my vinegar sharp.

I recommend Brian's vinegar-making handout, which he kindly emails to anyone requesting it; it has pretty much all you need to know in a concise form.

Miriam

jab
08-17-2005, 11:01 PM
Using mead to make vinegar on purpose???? Isn't that a sin? You may make mead vinegar, but not intentionally :'( :'(


Not if you promptly use it in a marinade for a slab of dead cow.

tj
09-09-2005, 11:24 PM
I am making wine vinegar in a glazed earthenwhare pot, with a vinegar mother. It tastes great (after a few months), but there is a slightly disturbing dry white deposit on the rim of the pot (20 cm above level of vinegar) and growing on the outside of the pot where the glased has fine cracks. Its been going for a few months. Could this be over excited vinegar mother or something else?

Fortuna_Wolf
09-10-2005, 01:04 AM
tj,
Most earthenware will do this regardless of the liquid in it. Water seeps into the cracks in the glazing and wets the earthenware. It dissolves a small bit of the mostly insoluble salts and minerals, seeps out with them (or up and in), where it dries just outside of the cracks and forms a crust. It'll also impart a flavor to whatever is stored in them too. I've heard of a distilled liquor made in central america that is aged in earthenware pots just for this flavor. Like oak...

Jmattioli
09-10-2005, 09:53 AM
Hey Anthony,

I also make Vinegar and have been making it with the same mother for over 5 years. My father had been using it for 10 years. I just shook his up and carried half of it home in a Mason jar. Been using it ever since. I never dilute the wine or mead I add. The mother stays on the bottom and I carefully siphon off a few inches of the clear stuff (no filter) after a few months to another jug (labeled undiluted Vinegar) before I add new wine or mead. Never had a restart. Of course, I make sure it stays long enough in the original mother to use up all the alcohol so that won't be possible. It is always clear by itself and then I leave it up to the user to dilute it if desired. I like the acidity full strength but have on occasion diluted in 50/50 with water. No restarts should take place if all the alcohol is gone.

Joe

andrew_buhl
09-10-2005, 01:40 PM
The white crystals are acetic acid - a component of vinigar

Dmntd
10-04-2005, 10:07 AM
I put about 3 quart of Stout Braggot in a gallon jug on August 27 then added a cup of mead vinegar and three mothers from the 2 gallon crock. Tasted it this morning, has a very nice malt flavor and after taste, even though it's not completely converted yet.

Anthony

The Persians are accustomed to deliberate on matters of the highest moment when warm with wine . . . Whatever also they discuss when sober, is always a second time examined after they have been drinking. --Herodotus

Miriam
10-05-2005, 12:32 PM
That sounds so nice, Anthony...braggot vinegar! I love malt vinegar - and creative cooking.

Miriam

Brewbear
10-07-2005, 01:25 AM
I like to use the old fashined ice tea jars, they have a small spigot that allows you to pour some of the vinegar without disturbing the sedimens.

Ted

Dmntd
10-10-2005, 09:00 PM
<----- Tapping his foot

This braggot is sure taking it's time about turning to vinegar.

Anthony

Dmntd
10-14-2005, 06:09 PM
Okay, having tired of waiting for this braggot to turn, I picked up a 1 1/2 gallon glass cookie jar. cleaned it, poured the braggot and mother from the gallon jug into it and tied a towel over the top.

Two days later, today, a new mother has formed and it's starting to stink like it should.

Anthony

And so, it seemed that fortune had smiled on Brad and Janet and that they had found the assistance that their plight required... Or had they?

Dmntd
10-29-2005, 04:09 PM
So the braggot vinegar has finished. It's black in color and perfectly clear.

Has anyone made beer/mead/wine only to make vinegar?

I'm thinking about a red pear vinegar.

8 lb ripe red pears
1 lb clover honey
8 oz dark Belgian rock candy
D47 yeast
water to 1 gallon

This should ferment to between 11% and 12%, rack after fermentation then add a gallon of water and a mother for 2 gallons of 5-6% pear vinegar.

Anthony

Brewbear
10-29-2005, 06:21 PM
Hey Anthony,
Making beer/wine/mead just to make it into vinegar.....That's just wrong,man, you're bringing tears to my eyes :'( :'(

Ted

lostnbronx
10-29-2005, 06:27 PM
Ah, but then he can make switchel with vinager made from mead, and then spike it with more mead before drinking! Fore and aft mead action! Wowzers!

-David

Brewbear
10-29-2005, 06:40 PM
Hey Lost,
Now I'm lost :-[
I have never heard of such a drink! Can you enlighten me?

Ted

Dmntd
10-29-2005, 07:40 PM
Hey Ted,

Switchel is a beverage of molasses and water, seasoned with vinegar and ginger.

Anthony

lostnbronx
10-29-2005, 08:38 PM
Bbear,

Switchel is an old-time soft drink that is wonderfully refreshing -- especially in hot weather, or after a lot of hard work. The recipes for it vary as widely as mead ones do, but the basic idea is to make a drink of spices and sugar water, and add just enough vinegar to it to make it tart. This creates a spicy-sweet-sour drink that goes down very easily. The trick is to only use enough vinegar to get the tartness, but not enough for it to taste like vinegar.

Here's one I googled up a few years ago, and that I like:

Title: HAYMAKER'S SWITCHEL
Categories: Beverages
Yield: 6 servings

1 c Brown sugar
1/2 ts Ginger
1/2 c Molasses
3/4 c Vinegar
2 qt Water

In haying season, farmers used to take their "nooning" (midday dinner) with
them, including a jug of Switchel to wash the meal down. Although Switchel
was usually straight, farmers have been known to spike it with hard cider,
or
even brandy which Down easters usd to say, "got the hay in the barn in half
the time." Mix together, add ice and chill.


-David

Dmntd
10-29-2005, 09:36 PM
Very cool David,

I'd heard of it, and had a general idea of what it was, but had never searched out a recipe for it.

Thank's & Happy mazing,

Anthony

briankettering
10-29-2005, 11:44 PM
Has anyone made beer/mead/wine only to make vinegar?


Yes, I generally make unhopped worts especially for making malt vinegar.

Most of my leftover meads and wines go into my blended meads.

I did try to make vinegar from a black mulberry melomel a number of years ago. It was not successful. >:(

Brian K