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sineyopitty
08-09-2005, 06:04 PM
I'm wondering if an experienced brewmaster can provide a ringing endorsement for any particular book on mead making. I'm looking for a general reference, but also something that has been updated within the past few years.....no 1985 publication date, please. I saw a few possibilities in the "store."

Oskaar
08-09-2005, 07:04 PM
The Compleat Meadmaker by Ken Schramm

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?product_id=2006336

Read it, learn it, live it!

Cheers,

Oskaar

byathread
08-09-2005, 07:09 PM
Without a doubt, Ken's book is a "must" for any meadmakers's library!

hedgehog
08-09-2005, 11:53 PM
ok.. I REALLY gotta ask.. its been driving me nuts for a while now... From his book, and his few posts on here Ken Schramm seems to be a very intelligent and well spoken person. Most of us can agree on that, no problem. But I have to ask...

WHY does he spell complete as compleat????

Its definately not ye old english style, I checked. It doesn't really rhyme with mead, at least not with out a few glasses of mead. I highly doubt its a typo, after all how many hundreds of thousands of his books are running around in the wild?? So what gives?? any clues??

Mynx
08-10-2005, 12:27 AM
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=compleat

It's a variant, according to Dictionary.com :D

Oskaar
08-10-2005, 12:36 AM
A couple of reasons that I'd guess at.

1. Ken is an avid fisherman and there was a book written by Izaac Walton called The Compleat Angler in 1653 compleat began life as an archaic form of the word "complete", but came to be used for the specific meaning below.

2. Compleat is a real word, meaning highly proficient.

3. The common adjective "complete," has many meanings, only one of which is "proficient"; others include "having all parts", "concluded", "thorough", "absolute", etc.

4. It's not unusual on the web: the last time I checked, over several thousand Web pages were also using the word (though often incorrectly, as a synonym for some other meaning of "complete").

Hope that helps,

Oskaar

WRATHWILDE
08-10-2005, 12:43 AM
According to the Dictionary / Thesaurus built into OS X - "ORIGIN: the spelling compleat is a revival of the 17th cent. use as in Walton's The Compleat Angler."

The Compleat Angler is said to be the third most printed book after the bible and Shakespeare, Interesting if it is because having read upward of 1000 books, I hadn't heard of it till about 6 months ago... but then I don't fish and have no desire to start now.

Wrathwilde

Meriadoc
08-10-2005, 12:47 AM
A couple of reasons that I'd guess at.

4. It's not unusual on the web: the last time I checked, over several thousand Web pages were also using the word (though often incorrectly, as a synonym for some other meaning of "complete").


Their arnt two many mispelings on the 'net; if severel thousand Web sights have "compleat" insted of "complete", i'm shure there trying to imply the meaning of "compleat" ewe describe earlier in ur post... ;) ::)

In geste,

Merry

sineyopitty
08-10-2005, 06:22 PM
Ordered the book. Thanks folks!!!

ken_schramm
09-13-2005, 01:57 PM
"Compleat" is purely an homage to Walton and his wonderful work.

Yours,
Piscator

AKA: Ken