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Pawn
08-09-2005, 09:40 PM
Hi everyone,
Great forum, I have been lurking for quite some time, I am a home brewer, my wife and I have only tasted one mead (Chouchen by Warenghem), we liked it but maybe a bit sweeter than need be, what category would this mead fit? sweet or semi-sweet?

I have been reading "the complete meadmaker" and I plan to ferment 4, 5 gal batches of mead, one each of cyser, sweet, medium sweet, and dry.

As I am new to this I would appreciate your input, there are a lot of recipes floating around and maybe you folks can point me towards some fairly basic recipes and links to any info that you believe would help me get these first batches going.

The Honey I am going to use is strawberry blossom from our family farm (raw un-pasteurized), I don't seem to be able to find any info on this particular honey.

I was also considering aging the mead in cornies after it clears, any input?

Any help will be greatly appreciated...John

Thanks Oskaar for recommending this forum and the book "The complete meadmaker"

Rathpig
08-09-2005, 10:31 PM
I find that varietal honey deserves a traditional still mead. honey, water, yeast.

hedgehog
08-09-2005, 11:48 PM
Just my two cents worth,
No insults intended, but I would definately hold off on the cyser. I agree with rathpig that a good varietal, especially one as rare as strawberry, should be saved for either a traditional mead, or a carefully planned melomel. So my personal thought is to try the cyser with some other honey(clover perhaps). The dry/sweet/semi-sweet sounds very promising with such an interesting honey as strawberry.
For recipes, if you have Ken Schramm's book, the traditional dry/semi/sweet show mead recipes seem to be a basic recipe.
I personally use a similar recipe as a base and manipulate it from there. Although I use either 71B or D-47 as my yeasts of choice, since I have yet to find any steinberger. Measuring honey by weight is difficult and sometimes, unreliable, so your hydrometer will be a good friend when you are figuring out if you have enough honey for a sweet or semi-sweet mead.
As for the corny kegs, you should bug Oskaar some more, since he claims to use them quite often. I know nothing about them, and consider myself doing ok if I can recognize one.
You mention you are a home brewer, would you mind telling us if that means wine, beer, or something else? It might help the future advice.
more rambling, hopefully with something usefull in it,
hedgehog

Pawn
08-10-2005, 01:40 AM
I find that varietal honey deserves a traditional still mead. honey, water, yeast.


Hi Rathpig,
In that single sentence you caused me 45 mins of reading so far, and I am to the word varietal :)
I sure do appreciate your help and although you probably couldnít tell from my noobish terminology in my opening post, I really do want to try to make something basic that highlights the character of our local honey for the sheer experience and also possibly the bragging rights, lol.
I hope you will all check in on this thread from time to time and help steer me in the right direction.



Just my two cents worth,
No insults intended, but I would definately hold off on the cyser. I agree with rathpig that a good varietal, especially one as rare as strawberry, should be saved for either a traditional mead, or a carefully planned melomel. So my personal thought is to try the cyser with some other honey(clover perhaps). The dry/sweet/semi-sweet sounds very promising with such an interesting honey as strawberry.
For recipes, if you have Ken Schramm's book, the traditional dry/semi/sweet show mead recipes seem to be a basic recipe...


Hi hedgehog,
No insult taken, I totally agree, understand I know very little at this point and am not yet even capable of knowing what questions I should be asking, your reply is also most helpful.
I really want to incorporate flavors from our fruit at the farm, and the melomel sounds very intriguing as we have several 4 lb containers full of sliced frozen strawberries from this very crop, the planning I will have to work on :-\
we will forget about the cyser this go around and replace it with strawberry melomel!?

One reason I am a little antsy is due to what I have read about the importance of using as fresh of honey as possible, the bee keeper is gathering my honey this week so Iím a bit excited (the enthusiasm of a child).
The recipes in Ken Schramm's book look great to me, by your validating them you have put my mind to rest, I will begin to focus on the process and Iím sure I will have more questions.

I am a beer home brewer, and I have an extra 8, 5 gal kegs I bought specifically for aging strong ales, cider, and hopefully mead.
Cheers...John

Miriam
08-10-2005, 03:16 AM
John,

Strawberry honey sounds so rare and divine that at least for the first batch, I would use it only as a show mead, as Hedgehog suggested. Honey, water, yeast.
That way you get to know the honey and can plan future melomels or variations with its particular character in mind.

Miriam

Pawn
08-10-2005, 10:33 AM
Hello Miriam,
thanks for the words of encouragement, I havent been able to find any info on strawberry blossom honey so I guess I will just have to see for myself.

My Daughter (a true Mead lover) will be getting married at the farm next yr, I plan to have her taste these meads, and at the wedding I will take a picture of her and her new husband against the mountain background (outside wedding) and make labels for all the bottles with exception of the one they will be taking with them when they leave on there honeymoon, so they will have some anniversary bottles in the years to come.

I have read many of your post and am most appreciative of your, and others sharing experiences, BTW I will be pitching the yeast 09-03-2005 the new moon ;)

Thanks...John

Norskersword
08-10-2005, 05:27 PM
Hey Pawn,

Honey, Water, Yeast, and Fermaid K. Don't forget the nutrient! ;)

Pawn
08-11-2005, 12:51 AM
Hello Norskersword, I recalled reading several posts about nutrients, but your reminder sent me back to reading and this time it soaked in. ;D

What about PH?

Heres my list of Ingredients so far

Honey - varietal
Water -maybe use water from the spring at the farm (boil to kill the wigglers)

Stuff Im making a list to order!

Lalvin 71B-1122 -for the dry show mead? (recipe suggest's Steinberger)
Lalvin D-47 -for the sweet/mediumsweet show mead (as per recipe)

Fermaid K -energizer
DAP -nutrient

PH test strips 3-6 -will these do the trick, or do I need a PH probe?

I cant see where there is much differance between using the brewing ingredient suppliers lime flower (Ca03) or just opening a 80 lb bag at the farm and filling up a zip lock, other than we pay 5.00 for 80 lbs and the brewing ingredient suppliers
are asking 5.00 a lb, is there a differance other than there lime is probably sifted?

Primary blowoff.
will I be able to use 5 gal carboys?
I have 1, 6.5 gal, and 4, 5 gal carboys

I did find steinberger yeast

http://www.dwinesupplies.com/id32_m.htm

A rather large quantity, and the only documentation I was able to find on the web so far was in German :-\

Thanks for the help and encouragement folks, did I miss anything?
Cheers...John

byathread
08-11-2005, 01:56 PM
Personally I haven't worried about pH and have yet to run into any problems, but I may pickup a pH meter at some point. IMHO 71B is an excellent choice for a dry mead as it won't leave the mead bone dry as champagne yeasts will.

I got Steinberg yeast in small quantities from http://www.thebeveregepeople.com. I believe it too should leave a very a dry mead just off-dry (which I prefer), though I have yet to use it.

I have used 5g carboys for 5g batches successfully by reserving 1/2-3/4 gal of the must in the fridge (or a separate 1 gal carboy fermenting next to it) and topping up over the course of primary. Do this very carefully (expecially if adding raw [unfermented] sugars to an active primary). Anyway, I've used this technique with success and relative ease. Haven't yet had the need for a blowoff tube as I normally do primary in a 6.5.

Also consider aerating the must a couple times per day the first 48-72 hours. This will keep the yeasts quite happy and fermentation will proceed quickly.

Enjoy!
Kirk

quirky
08-12-2005, 01:32 PM
Pawn -
I am wondering if you would like to sell some of that honey?
Suzette

Pawn
08-12-2005, 02:40 PM
Personally I haven't worried about pH and have yet to run into any problems, but I may pickup a pH meter at some point. IMHO 71B is an excellent choice for a dry mead as it won't leave the mead bone dry as champagne yeasts will.

I got Steinberg yeast in small quantities from http://www.thebeveregepeople.com. I believe it too should leave a very a dry mead just off-dry (which I prefer), though I have yet to use it.

Hello Kirk,
Iím thinking I will be doing some one gallon test batches this winter so Iím going to go ahead and get a pH meter as it may also help to improve my beer brewing, besides it will give me another toy to play with while I wait for my ferments to mature. ;)

Thanks for the link, I see that still looks to be a rather large quantity of Steinberg, Iím not sure that I would use it soon enough, if you or anyone else in this forum wouldnít mind parting with a couple batches worth of this yeast I would be glad to mail some cash and a stamped self addressed envelope:)
I will stick with the 71B (tentatively), and look forward to some Steinberg test batches.

If I feel I need to make any adjustments to the pH I will be sure to post here before I do anything else!



I have used 5g carboys for 5g batches successfully by reserving 1/2-3/4 gal of the must in the fridge (or a separate 1 gal carboy fermenting next to it) and topping up over the course of primary. Do this very carefully (expecially if adding raw [unfermented] sugars to an active primary). Anyway, I've used this technique with success and relative ease. Haven't yet had the need for a blowoff tube as I normally do primary in a 6.5.

That is the answer I was hoping for, I was most worried about wasting mead out the BBO tube, sounds like I can just shoulder up for the primary.
Iím thinking I will brew a small (volume) must for top off and use the excess for a gallon test batch, that way I will end up with at least one test batch (probably cyser's) for each 5 gallon batch, the idea of fermenting a gallon for top off is also a good one :-\ it will be nice to be able to reserve the 6.5 carboy for beer.




Also consider aerating the must a couple times per day the first 48-72 hours. This will keep the yeasts quite happy and fermentation will proceed quickly.

Enjoy!
Kirk


Iím glad you mentioned that, I normally re-aerate my beers but was curious about the length of time mead could be aerated without troubles, I will wrestle around with it AM/PM for the first 3 days, thanks you have all been a big help, Iím confident enough to place an order for the list in my above post.
I will keep you all posted, I will be keeping a good log ( all the data) and while I know show mead is no mystery to most of you I will post the logs of these 3 varietal batches just for the n00bs like me. ;D

Thanks people and best to you all...John

::edit:: quirky has posted while I was writing this novel ;D



Pawn -
I am wondering if you would like to sell some of that honey?
Suzette


Hi Suzette, I am purchasing this honey from our farms pollinator/beekeeper "Jerry Tate"
Here is a link to his webhttp://www.tateshoneyfarm.com/ you will find his email address there (he is fairly prompt with his replies)
Im sure he would be happy to do business with you (heís really a great guy), and Iím pretty sure he will have more of this strawberry blossom honey, in fact I would be willing to bet I will only use half of the honey from our farm, and there is another strawberry grower not more than 2 miles from us, as far as I know Mr. Tate takes care of all the farms in our area (Mead, Wa).
Let me know if Jerry is not able to help you, or if you need less than 5 gallons I will probably have some left over and although I have test batches planned I would not be opposed to using a different variety, Feel free to let Jerry know you were referred by John at Siemers Farm LLC, Iím sure he will give you a great deal regardless, let me know if I can be of any more help
Cheers...John

Pawn
08-12-2005, 03:49 PM
Ive decided to start three 1 gallon batches of Joe's ancient orange http://www.gotmead.com/smf/index.php/topic,600.0.html

This way I will get a sample of what a mead ferment looks like in advance, hopefully this will take a little stress out of these 5 gallon show mead batches I plan to pitch on 09-03-05, I will be using clover honey, can't wait to taste the "Joe's ancient orange".
Cheers...John

byathread
08-12-2005, 06:31 PM
John,

Sorry, here's a specific link to a small pkg of Steinberg from the Beverage People. Just 10g so it should be enough for 2x5g batches and a bargain at $2 bucks.

http://store.thebeveragepeople.com/pgi-PRODUCTSPEC?WY29

Cheers,
Kirk

Pawn
08-12-2005, 08:33 PM
John,

Sorry, here's a specific link to a small pkg of Steinberg from the Beverage People. Just 10g so it should be enough for 2x5g batches and a bargain at $2 bucks.

http://store.thebeveragepeople.com/pgi-PRODUCTSPEC?WY29

Cheers,
Kirk


Thanks Kirk, no need to be sorry I probably looked right at it without realizing (identified as WY29) I ordered up two packets, so I will have an unopened spare. ;)

Joe's Ancient orange went well, I found I only had enough honey for 2 batches, I dont have a scale at the house so I went by the hydrometer readings, ended up with a original gravity of 1.135 (before adding orange etc...) with 3 inches of headspace, one batch has half a cinnamon stick and one clove, the other is per recipe with ALL the spices,
we buy red star "basic yeast" in bulk so thats what I used rather than the fleischmann's, the two jugs are bubbling away, thanks Joe, Im sure we will enjoy this mead, Cheers...John

Pawn
08-13-2005, 10:22 PM
SUBTOTAL:
TAX:
FREIGHT:
TOTAL: $3.90
$0.00
$6.00
$9.90 :-\

http://store.thebeveragepeople.com/pgi-PRODUCTSPEC?WY29
::Note to self::When it says you will be charged after we decide on the shipping method, RUN!

::edit:: Always!

byathread
08-15-2005, 12:14 PM
I believe shipping was the same cost when I ordered about $25 worth of assorted yeasts and other light items.

With large orders I go with Morebeer.com as they give free shipping when the order total is $50+.

Fortuna_Wolf
08-15-2005, 12:26 PM
What? more beer gives free shipping over 50 dollars? I could have ordered 5 dollars of junk and saved 10 dollars in shipping? ARGH!

memento
08-15-2005, 12:37 PM
And apparently Midwest Supplies also has free shipping over $50. I didn't know this until I made a purchase yesterday. $51. And they initially said $9 shipping, but when it was all done they dropped it. It could have been an error, but since it's an automated system, I think that they do it that way.

Pawn
08-15-2005, 05:41 PM
Heh, I was more just kicking myself, they had a comment box and I should have typed in and asked them to simply toss the packets in a envelope, I believe all post offices are air conditioned so the yeast would probably fair better than if it was shipped UPS/FedX.

Heck I can't be angry at them, I will just email before ordering next time, and maybe they will figure out they need to have a bit more sophisticated shopping cart system if they want the web business hassle free;)

Point is I will have stienberger yeast and didnt have to buy a truckload. 8)

I get 99% of my beer ingredients/equipment from morebeer.com, not only is the shipping free for orders above 49.00 but them people really treat me right.

I think it would be great if we had a thread just for posting all these great places to purchase brewing supplies.

BTW, I have been mulling it over and am thinking I may only try one (5 gal)batch of the show mead just to see how things go first, because I don't know if I could live with myself having 20 gals of (MY FIRST) mead go bad. :o

the 2 gals of Joe's ancient orange is definately going to pull through, lol, even with a 3" headspace I had to bring it down to 66f the other night to keep it from exploding, it seems to be in its (and my) comfort zone at 70f so I will respect that. :)

Cheers...John

Pawn
08-27-2005, 10:33 PM
Hey my bucket of honey arrived the other day ;D
Due to the fact Im really not to experienced with this, I overlooked one important thing, the strawberry field is near a pumpkin field, so in reality I have 5 gallons of strawberry/pumpkin/wildflower honey ???

Its tasty and amber color, Im hoping it will store for a while in 1 gallon plastic malt extract containers, Im planning on breaking it into one gallon containers tomorow.

The steinberg yeast (used in the dry show mead recipe) is supposed to tolerate down to 50f temperature, I am wondering if 55 to 65f (fruit room temp) will be ok for the primary or should I try to keep it near 70f?

The anxiety got to me so I brewed 20 gallons of beer in the last week, lol, I plan on starting these mead brews Sept 3rd, wish me luck, Cheers...John

byathread
08-27-2005, 10:50 PM
If the Steinberg is suitable for temps down to 50, I think you should go for it. Cooler temps mean slower fermentation which ought to decrease the loss of aromatics.

I'm jealous of your cool temps. The heat index has been around 110 F for a week here. Dog days of August, man. Whew!! :'(

PS - Luck!

Pawn
08-27-2005, 11:33 PM
If the Steinberg is suitable for temps down to 50, I think you should go for it. Cooler temps mean slower fermentation which ought to decrease the loss of aromatics.

I'm jealous of your cool temps. The heat index has been around 110 F for a week here. Dog days of August, man. Whew!! :'(

PS - Luck!


Hey thanks, that will work great, Im going to put it in the fruit room at my folks.

Yeah tell me about it, its been pretty hot here as well (90f is hot for us), it kind of sucks having to move 20 gallons of beer out of the bathtub to take a shower, lol.
Cheers...John

Miriam
08-28-2005, 05:22 AM
John,

I suggest that one of your plain meads that you'll be making on Sept. 3rd not include nutrient or anything but the three basic ingredients. You will see how well fermentation goes and how delicious it is, as pure and un-interfered with as possible. Just remember that racking and bottling should be done at new moon time, too.

Marion, are you reading this? See what you converted me to? ;)

Miriam

Pawn
08-28-2005, 02:56 PM
Miriam,
After reading all the horror stories (stuck ferments) I was more than a little daunted, Ken Schramm's book is great but the yeast descriptions leave little to be desired, they would be fine if I was a seasoned wine maker.

I found a reply from Marion stating he uses a 3;1 honey water ratio, this fits fairly close with Ken Schramm's medium show mead, in which Mr Schramm also indicates D-47 yeast and ample nutrients, if you have any other yeast preferences please speak up soon. ;)

::yes I am still going to try it without nutrients::

I am thinking of brewing two batches of the medium show mead, one with 12.5 lbs honey to 5 gallon total volume, and the other with 14 lbs (the max) to 5 gal volume.

I still havent decided on the water, but am thinking I will use the heavy calcium laiden water from the drilled well for both brews as the spring water would have to be boiled or otherwise purified (it has wigglers).

Im hoping this recipe and water will have a good chance of fermenting out without problems, I see D-47 is rated as low as 50f also, anyone think I will have problems with this yeast at 55 to 65f ferment temperatures?

I think I will hold off on the dry mead (steinberg yeast), I am thinking this dry mead will have a better chance fermenting out with no nutrient additions, but on the other hand the medium show mead will be more of a crowd pleaser, so if the two batches of medium show mead have problems in the primary I will reserve this honey incase I need to start another, who knows, if the 2 medium batches have problems they may endup being dry mead. :)

Cheers...John

Oskaar
08-28-2005, 03:32 PM
Howdy Pawn,

Somehow I missed this thread.

Listen if you're looking for a sweeter mead, or even a medium sweet mead, you'll need to up your honey levels if you plan to use D-47 you'll need to have a starting gravity of about 1.120 or above. In the following link to my yeast test with D-47 you'll note that the gravity at racking was 1.009 which is about medium sweet to me. The starting gravity was 1.120 so that means you'll need at least 16 lbs of honey in your five gallon yield in order to give you a medium sweet mead using D-47.

http://www.gotmead.com/smf/index.php/topic,650.msg4213.html#msg4213

Hope that helps,

Oskaar

Pawn
08-28-2005, 05:11 PM
Hi Oskaar,

No problem, I would have eventually ended up bugging you as well as these other nice folks.
I guess I better not take them recipes for granted, I remember viewing your yeast test's a while back and like a fool I didnít bookmark that thread, thanks for digging up the link for me!
unfortunately I still know so little about mead I can't really explain what I want any other way than just saying I want a mead that finishes with the flavor of this honey, is not overly sweet, and will be enjoyed by many,lol.

I have been open fermenting my beer (primary) lately, I see Marion is using this method with mead, Iím wondering if I might have luck starting a must in a bucket then funneling into a 6.5 gal carboy at full krausen to add oxygen and install an airlock, just a thought, Cheers...John

Oskaar
08-29-2005, 09:22 AM
snip . . . I still know so little about mead I can't really explain what I want any other way than just saying I want a mead that finishes with the flavor of this honey, is not overly sweet, and will be enjoyed by many,lol. . .

That's about the best description of a nice medium sweet mead I've heard! It seems like the more I learn about mead, the less I feel I know about mead. Kind of ironic! LOL

Some of the best mead that I've had is from Croatia, and I just ran across a couple of recipes from a beekeeper there. Vicky and I were on the phone looking a some Slovak, Polish, Russian and Croatian websites for links and recipe information and stumbled across a Croatian Honey/Beekeeper's website. I'm translating the recipes (there are some local dialect issues on my part that I want to be sure are translated correctly before I post them up) I'll take a whack at making them once I have them posted. One of my friends smuggled some Acacia honey in from Croatia, so that sucker is going to get made into mead once the weather breaks here and I feel I have a ten day window for a fermentation at a reasonable temperature. There is also a recipe for a Gverc which is a traditional drink made around the Zagreb area of Croatia that I'll post as well.

Cheers,

Oskaar

byathread
08-29-2005, 01:57 PM
Vicky and I were on the phone looking a some Slovak, Polish, Russian and Croatian websites for links and recipe information and stumbled across a Croatian Honey/Beekeeper's website. I'm translating the recipes (there are some local dialect issues on my part that I want to be sure are translated correctly before I post them up) I'll take a whack at making them once I have them posted.


You guys rock!! Count me in, I'm very excited to try my hand at brewing some traditional old world meads.



One of my friends smuggled some Acacia honey in from Croatia...


Do you happen to know if Croatian honey is from Acacia sp.? I've been told by a beekeeper/importer that German Acacia honey (and presumably Polish Acacia honey) are in fact from Robinia sp. Acacia species are not adaptable to the northern climes of Germany or Poland (that I'm aware of), though I have discovered that Robinia sp. (probably Robinia pseudoacacia - Black Locust, which is naturalized across much of Europe) are common nectar plants there. However, I know Croatia has a considerably warmer/milder climate that Northern Europe and true Acacia sp. may grow there. Regardless, they should be fairly similar honeys as both are in the Leguminosae family.

Just curious,
Kirk

byathread
08-29-2005, 02:19 PM
Nevermind. I think I answered my own question. I had a few minutes at lunch to research and the best single source of info for my quest was found <a href="http://www.worldagroforestry.org/sea/Products/AFDbases/af/asp/SpeciesInfo.asp?SpID=1454">here</a>.

Robinia pseudoacacia is a very significant plant in world agroforestry, being used for timber, fodder, honey production, etc. It is also grown widely across Europe (particularly Hungary though including at least eastern Croatia), Asia and elsewhere. Also, they had this to say about the honey produced from it.

"R. pseudoacacia honey is regarded as one of the worldís finest. The slowly granulating honey is water-white, heavy bodied, fine flavoured with high fructose and low enzyme content."

The tree is native to eastern and southeastern US (as Black Locust) and is available from multiple suppliers (do a search on honeylocator.com) including, I believe, Spring Hill Merchant*. Just in case others are interested in authenticity. FYI, this seems to be a very common honey in European meads (in my very limited research).

In case anyone else had the slightest interest... ;)
Kirk



* Its just listed as Locust honey on the website (which could conceivably be from Honey Locust, related but in a completely different genus), though honeylocator lists it as Black Locust. I've sent the kind folks at Spring Hill Merchant an email to confirm.

byathread
08-29-2005, 07:29 PM
The ever-helpful and friendly Terri Watts from Spring Hill Merchant promptly informed me that it is in fact Honey Locust honey (also known as Gleditsia triacanthos for you latin buffs). Not the first time Honeylocator.com proves inaccurate when it comes to honey varieties, but still an invaluable resource. So it looks like authentic old world "Acacia" honey will need to be purchased elsewhere. Terri also informs that their wildflower is excellent and mostly a mix of honey locust and blueberry as the primary floral sources.

Oskaar
08-30-2005, 11:59 AM
Most of the "Acaia" honey in Croatia is from the false locust (tree) Robinia pseudacacia. It is called Bagrem in Croatian and is pretty damn incredible honey. I love the stuff so I'll be making a gallon batch of it here in the next few days.

Cheers,

Oskaar

byathread
08-30-2005, 04:22 PM
Aha! my research lead me to the correct conclusion. I will try to get ahold of some so I can try your recipe too.

I can get imported "acacia" honey from middle eastern shops here (I think they were from Croatia or eastern Eur). However, they come in 1 lb jars and are pricey, so I think I'll hold out and find a supplier of Black Locust honey from the eastern US.

Pawn
08-31-2005, 09:57 PM
Hey Oskaar,
I did some reading, and that sounds like some really good honey, any idea where I could purchase a bottle of Acacia mead ( without taking out a mortgage) for my wife and I to taste?

Here is a place to buy Acacia and other honey by the ton ;D
http://www.agriseek.com/buy-sell/e/Ag-Products/Bee/Honey/Acacia/

byathread,
I came up with some of the same info as well as finding the Locust tree grows just about anywhere and the honey locust and black locust are native to the US, I don't remember ever seeing a large grove though, perhaps these other countries don't have evergreens for the locust to compete with, heh, the honey 10.99 a lb though ??? I Might buy a lb just to taste, and leave the acacia mead making to you pro's.

3 more days till I start my mead's ;D
Cheers...John

Oskaar
08-31-2005, 10:30 PM
I think Miller's honey carries Acacia by the 1 lb jar

http://www.millershoney.com

Check it out!

Cheers,

Oskaar

Pawn
08-31-2005, 10:51 PM
Here is a place to buy Acacia and other honey by the ton ;D
http://www.agriseek.com/buy-sell/e/Ag-Products/Bee/Honey/Acacia/

"the honey 10.99 a lb though"



Thanks for the heads up, but I found the honey, by the ton ^and by the lb http://igourmet.gourmetfoodmall.com/ProductDetail.php?product=5821

Wouldnt mind tasting the mead though, I will keep my eyes open, thanx...John

byathread
09-01-2005, 02:42 PM
I called Miller's but they said they do not normally carry Acacia honey. If they did, I'd guess it would be from true Acacia sp. I know true Acacia honey is produced in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and probably California, as well as Mexico. Texas is famous for its Huajillo honey (Acacia berlandieri) and also produces Whitethorn honey (Acacia contricta) as well as honeys from other Acacia species. True acacia species are very common legume trees/shrubs in the harsh lands of the southwest (as well as arid lands worldwide), as well as being very heavy nectar-producers. I look forward to late April every year when the local Acacia's are smothered in their tiny golden puffball flowers.

But I digress... ;)

Kirk

byathread
09-01-2005, 02:53 PM
Incidentally, I went to a middle eastern market yesterday to pick up a couple of things and check on the "Acacia" honey. It is from Hungary (who have extensive plantations of Black Locust for wood, fodder, honey, etc) and runs $4.50/lb. I opted instead to get an 18oz jar of Forest honey from Bulgaria to try out.

Oskaar
09-01-2005, 03:12 PM
We have several middle-east markets here in the Orange County area of So Cal and they're a great resource for mead making. Everything from spices to wonderful fresh fruit and different honeys. And of course, Lamb!

Cheers,

Oskaar

Pawn
09-08-2005, 12:22 AM
No middle-east markets here but we do have Lamb ;D

I almost didnít start that batch of mead I had scheduled for Sept 3rd, it seems Yeasties are not the only ones that thrive at the new moon, to cut the story short I have a funeral to attend next Saturday and possibly 2 more in the near future (bought a new suit today).

Due to the recent events I was a little paranoid about the natural mead so I used nutrients in hopes of having a good (fool proof) first batch, my wife helped me we had about one hr of free time.

5 gallon
16 lbs honey
2 tsp DAP
Pitched 2 packets (re-hydrated) Lalvin D-47 @ must temp 80f
OG 1.131

I ran 2 gallons of the must through the blender, and the next day there was still 1 inch of foam at the top, no activity, removed the foil cover and installed a airlock.

Sept 5th noon, 15 bubbles per minute, slight melting plastic smell, temp 72f.

Sept 7th same activity and smell, temp 72f, corrected Gravity 1.110, added 1 quart 1.131 must with 2 tsp yeast hulls.

What do you folks think, is 72f to high of a primary temp?
The beers/carboys sitting around the mead are @64f (secondary), so that mead is definitely putting off some heat.

If you all think this temperature is good for primary, I also planned on moving this batch to the fruit room at the farm for secondary which should stay between 55 and 60f all winter, thanks, Cheers...John

Brewbear
09-08-2005, 02:04 AM
Hi,
This link is to a web page describing all of the various yeasts, well most of them. http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/strains.asp
As far as D-47 is concerned, 72 deg.F should be good. The temps in my neck of the woods are in high 70's with the A/C going full blast but I had to start 2 5 gal batches. One is a show mead with only honey, water and yeast (K1-V the temp range is much higher).

Hope it helps,
Ted

Pawn
09-24-2005, 11:59 PM
Hey folks,
I found a small jar of Acacia honey at the local "world market", this honey is great thank you for opening my eyes, I always thought honey was just honey and never realized there would be so much differance in the varieties.

I havent been able to pester you folks much lately, as we are in the middle of what looks to be a great fall harvest, Cheers...John

Pawn
09-25-2005, 12:21 AM
Hi,
This link is to a web page describing all of the various yeasts, well most of them. http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/strains.asp
As far as D-47 is concerned, 72 deg.F should be good. The temps in my neck of the woods are in high 70's with the A/C going full blast but I had to start 2 5 gal batches. One is a show mead with only honey, water and yeast (K1-V the temp range is much higher).

Hope it helps,
Ted


Hi Ted,
Thanks for the link, Im learning as I go :)
The Mead is still chuggin along, 1 blip every 4 seconds, I checked the gravity 09-22-05 and was at 1.034, been gently swirling every morning and every evening, and replaced the clogged airlock twice in the last week.

I wish you well with your new mead ferments, when things settle down a bit (work) I will try the K1-V as well.
Finally cooler weather, the ales are clearing nicely in secondary, best to you...John

Brewbear
09-25-2005, 08:08 PM
Hey John,
Keep in mind that even though the literature places D-47 at 14% alcohol tolerance, my experience with it tells me that it runs closer to 15 -16% alcohol. K1-V will run to 18% alcohol almost every time and if fed in stages it will go to 20%. This will tend to require a longer aging time.

Have fun,
Ted

Pawn
10-02-2005, 07:01 PM
Thank you Ted,
I sampled the mead yesterday (10-01-05), the gravity was at 1.015 with 8 blips per minute, 15.22% ABV if my calculations are correct,
there is a lot of honey flavor, the sweetness suits me fine although hot alcohol makes it difficult for a newbee like me to get a good idea what it might taste like a year from now.

Today (10-02-05), hey this thing is coming in for a landing, 4-5 blips per minute, I am rather ancious, in hopes of racking to secondary tomorow (new moon).

I will be starting another batch (#2), this time with a OG of 1.120, the sediment from a one gallon 1.060 starter of lalvin D-47, and no nutrients just honey, water, and yeast (I did use a little DME in the starter).

Thanks folks, I hope all is well with everyone, Cheers...John

::edit:: I did some reading in this awesome forum, and it looks like I will relax and rack this mead when the primary ferment has ceased, who knows maybe next month;)

lostnbronx
10-02-2005, 08:15 PM
there is a lot of honey flavor, the sweetness suits me fine although hot alcohol makes it difficult for a newbee like me to get a good idea what it might taste like a year from now.


Some of us who've been doing it for a few years are not much better off in the prediction department, let me tell you! Time is simply magic to a mead. You're likely to be very impressed at the change, but predicting its progress is like reading tea leaves -- nice if you can do it, but most of us just have to wait and see.

-David

Pawn
10-14-2005, 03:17 PM
lostnbronx, I understand, I imagine if I ever get to a point where I can judge a mead at a young age, it will probably no longer be a priority ;D , thanks for the kind words!

Finally racked the #1 mead to secondary today, there was 2 blips per min out of the airlock, the gravity @ 64f was @ 1.008, If my calcs are correct giving a ABV of 16.14%.

The smell from the airlock was of garbage :P the sample in the hydrometer jar lost its foul smell after airing for a few minutes :-\

The honey sweetness is no longer so obvious, same hot taste accompanied by a slight bitterness (acid taste)which really lingers.

One blip every 2 mins in secondary, the yeast will hopefully crap out soon.

Whelp, off to start a 5 gallon batch of Joe's ancient orange, cheers...John

Brego Brew
01-21-2011, 12:27 PM
I REALLY want to know how this one turned out.

Does anyone remember this guy? Oskaar, do you know how this turned out?

Jonas

YogiBearMead726
01-21-2011, 12:52 PM
This thread is over 5 years old...I doubt anyone involved is still active enough to enlighten you as to the result. That's the problem with reviving dead/old threads...it's pointless.

Try PMing the person who started this. Who knows, he might respond. In general though, I'd stay away from posting to a thread over 2 years old. It's hardly ever worth it.

Edit: just realized the person posting isn't even a member...so...maybe you can't PM them...

Brego Brew
01-21-2011, 01:03 PM
This thread is over 5 years old...

*sigh*

I know this thread is five years old, BUT if you read the very first original posts, guess who... Oskaar! And one or two others that I recognize. I knew I couldn't pm the guy, because I can see he's not a member or I wouldn't have revived this thread at all.

Jonas

YogiBearMead726
01-21-2011, 02:13 PM
I understand...and I guess I should apologize for being such a "Debbie Downer". I've had similar inquiries to threads less than 2 years old, started by a mentor, and I can say that you'll rarely get a reply. Especially with something like this, where the thread/recipe is in someone else's log book.

Unless this person sent out samples to Oskaar, I doubt he remembers/has the time to go looking for notes on this. Between running the site, job, and setting up for the Mazer Cup, I too would be exhausted.

Again, I didn't mean to discourage your pursuit of info, just trying to be realistic. :)