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Angus
08-23-2005, 01:53 PM
Hello all.

First, thanks so much for the constant dialogue on this site. Although not new to brewing, I am new to the joy of Mead brewing and your comments and pointers have prepared me for my next obsession. I have actually learned more of what not to do from here than from any book.

Second, are any of you from the Milwaukee area? I have seen that a number of you have attended workshops at LHBS's in the Southern California area, and I would not mind having a similar gathering in the Dairy State. I am a great proponent of learning by watching, and having a more experienced Mead brewer close at hand would be very useful.

Finally, to my brewing question. Milwaukee has a fairly high level of chlorine content (following a fairly nasty episode in the 90's that resulted in one death). I have been heating the water up to near boiling to 'cook' the chlorine out, but I then have to wait for the whole must to cool down before I can pitch the yeast. From my experience with fish tanks, I know there are chemicals that can be added that will remove the chlorine and make it safe for the fish. Is there anything similar that can be used in brewing that is safe and does not change the taste of the resultant Mead?

Appreciate any input.

Dan McFeeley
08-23-2005, 02:01 PM
Finally, to my brewing question. Milwaukee has a fairly high level of chlorine content (following a fairly nasty episode in the 90's that resulted in one death). I have been heating the water up to near boiling to 'cook' the chlorine out, but I then have to wait for the whole must to cool down before I can pitch the yeast. From my experience with fish tanks, I know there are chemicals that can be added that will remove the chlorine and make it safe for the fish. Is there anything similar that can be used in brewing that is safe and does not change the taste of the resultant Mead?

Although there are chemicals you can pick up at a local pet store that will remove the threat of chlorine contamination for fish, I wouldn't want to drink them. Could very well be unsafe for human consumption!

There are water filters available that will take out chemicals from drinking water, including chlorine and chlorine products. That could work. Check out Home Depot or the local equivalent.

Even easier, bottled water is cheap, comes in one gallon and larger sizes.

Angus
08-23-2005, 04:15 PM
Purified, filtered, bottled water. Yes, I had that as another option. One more thing to lug back from the store though. Chlorine filters sounds far more appealing. I will stop off at Home Depot on the way home and check things out. Thanks for the advice.

briankettering
08-23-2005, 04:38 PM
Second, are any of you from the Milwaukee area? I have seen that a number of you have attended workshops at LHBS's in the Southern California area, and I would not mind having a similar gathering in the Dairy State. I am a great proponent of learning by watching, and having a more experienced Mead brewer close at hand would be very useful.


I am one of those guys who have both attended and taught workshops at my LHBS in Southern California.

I would suggest asking the people who work at your LHBS if they know any mead brewers. It should be amazing to see how many mead makers will come out of the woodwork. ;D

Brian K

Pawn
08-23-2005, 07:31 PM
Purified, filtered, bottled water. Yes, I had that as another option. One more thing to lug back from the store though. Chlorine filters sounds far more appealing. I will stop off at Home Depot on the way home and check things out. Thanks for the advice.


You may want to make sure it is chlorine and not chloramine in your water, check out this article http://www.dld123.com/q&a/qandatemp.php?id=Q47

I looked into filtering our water a while back and did quite a bit of research but didnt keep notes/links :(
Cheers...John

GntlKnght
08-23-2005, 11:48 PM
You may want to make sure it is chlorine and not chloramine in your water
The linked-page would not open for me, so it may have said what I am about to, but here it goes. If your city uses chloramine, here are some facts about it:

Chloramine cannot be removed by boiling water, adding salt, or letting water stand still. Treatment devices to reduce chloramine levels are available. These devices should be independently tested and specifically certified to reduce chloramine. Although home filtration systems will reduce the level of chloramine from water, it will not remove it completely.

GntlKnght
08-23-2005, 11:57 PM
And a solution I found on http://www.rackers.org/newsletters/9811news.shtml


As he has done so often in the past, A.J. deLange--frequent contributor to the Homebrew Digest Internet mailing list and occasional contributor to "Brewing Techniques"--has come to our collective rescue. His research indicates that you can effectively remove 3 mg/L of chloramine or 6 mg/L of chlorine from twenty gallons of water by adding a single 695 mg Campden tablet.

All you need to do is add the crushed Campden tablet to cold water, stir, and let it sit. The reaction takes place in a couple of minutes. Then you're ready to roll! This method will add a smidge more chloride, potassium, and sulfate to your water.

Pawn
08-24-2005, 01:25 AM
You may want to make sure it is chlorine and not chloramine in your water, check out this article http://www.dld123.com/q&a/qandatemp.php?id=Q47

I looked into filtering our water a while back and did quite a bit of research but didnt keep notes/links :(
Cheers...John


Sorry about the link, it works for me, which does you absolutely no good,lol.

Here is a quote from that article incase it is indeed chloramine, and you are still interested in filtering the water
There is a new type of carbon that does remove chloramine called Centaur® carbon. It has unique properties that enhance the ability of the carbon to adsorb certain specific chemicals. It is widely used to remove chloramines. When I first moved here to Florida, I was able to get a whole house filter with Centaur® carbon from all the local water dealers.

Thanks GntlKnght, thats great info, I might try the campden on a batch of beer myself to see if I can tell any difference in the primary ferment, I think we have chloramine in our city water as well but hey the ferments have been good;)
Cheers...John

Angus
08-24-2005, 08:59 AM
GntlKnght,

Great tip for using the Campden tablets and one I will use from this point on. Thanks for posting it.

I checked the water quality report on the Milwaukee Water Works website, and they do not use Chloramine. Chlorate, Chloride, Chlorine, and Chlorite (with a dash of Arsenic???), but no Chloramine. So no filters for me.

Also, the link works for me Pawn, so thanks for posting that one. It helped explain why there was also chloroform in the water along with the old lace.