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JamesP
02-05-2004, 03:55 AM
I tasted some pineapple mead I had, that came about by mixing some left-over mead (a ginger/yellow box metheglin) with some leftover pineapple wine (it is in a 600ml PET bottle).

It is now about 6 months old, sitting in the fridge, and has sweet-sticky honey/pineapple nose, but the taste was a real let down, because it was dry and the fruit flavour didn't come through :-/

Oh well, I'll sweeten it with some honey, and let it sit some more.

It can be a real let-down when the nose suggests one thing, and the tongue gives you another ::)

All part of the learning process!!

Sabastian
02-25-2004, 05:17 PM
James,
I started a 5gal batch of what I thought would be a great combination, Cherry/Pineapple. After a week in the Primary it was clear that this was to be no normal mead! The odor was hideous and my wife made me move it so she didn't have to smell it! After a few weeks I racked it and it was still Cherry Kerosine. Now almost a year later it resembles a beautiful Chardonay, according to my wine drinking buddies anyway. No one can even taste the fruits that went into it but all in all that aweful blend turned out pretty good.
I've since been told that Pineapple tends to taste aweful for about 6 months after fermentation but cleans up nicely around the one year marker.
All I can say is, Don't give up on it! No one has been able to tell me why the Pineapple does this or whether or not your use of wine will change that result or not, but time will tell. You might just end up with something really good in a few months. ;)

JoeM
02-25-2004, 11:16 PM
Is the smell you speak of a sulfery, rotten egg smell?

Rurouni85Samurai
02-26-2004, 06:16 AM
Wonder how Coconut and Pineapple would taste ??? Anyone out there ever think of trying it with that? (I have coconut tree's and I am growing some Pineapple plants right now).

TeaTruck
02-26-2004, 05:30 PM
Is the smell you speak of a sulfery, rotten egg smell?

My first batch--fermenting for about three weeks now--smelled just like that for the first week. It was a little disconcerting, but it smells fine now. Should I be more concerned? I just guessed it was from the potassium metabisulphite and hoped it would go away.

JoeM
02-26-2004, 10:18 PM
Did your mead happen to be a cyser? Many fruits realease sulfer containing compounds when initially fermenting. This is ESPECIALLY true for apples. Ciders and cysers can smell absolutly disgusting for the first few days, kind of a rotten egg/rotting fruit/nasty gasbage kind of smell. At times it can even fill a closet or small room and be almost overwhelming. The smell should completely dissipate within a week or two and will not effect the flavor of the final product.

TeaTruck
02-27-2004, 01:21 AM
No, just plain mead from a kit I got at the homebrew store where I get all my beer stuff. I've read a fair bit about making mead since I started this one and will do quite a few things differently next time, but for this one I've just been following instructions.

It's a five gallon batch with about 14 pounds of honey. Also, an unknown amount of acid blend, yeast nutrients, potassium metabisulphite, and bentonite (all pre-measured and mixed for the kit). A day after mixing all that together, I added the yeast and a package of oak chips. It took forever for the fermentation to start (about a week) and when it finally did that's when the smell got bad. I have no idea what part of that soup was causing the smell, but it was pretty rank.

Rurouni85Samurai
02-27-2004, 01:38 AM
A whole week just to start? Mine started with one hell of a bang, the next morning it spewing alot of delish smells into the air and that was without using a Yeast Started. I'm afraid that if I do use one now my bucket will go kaboom.

JoeM
02-27-2004, 02:24 AM
The Kit had you add metabisulfite BEFORE fermenting?

ThistyViking
02-27-2004, 02:42 AM
Did your mead happen to be a cyser? Many fruits realease sulfer containing compounds when initially fermenting. This is ESPECIALLY true for apples. Ciders and cysers can smell absolutly disgusting for the first few days, kind of a rotten egg/rotting fruit/nasty gasbage kind of smell. At times it can even fill a closet or small room and be almost overwhelming. The smell should completely dissipate within a week or two and will not effect the flavor of the final product.

I've made 6 or 7 cysers and never experienced this effect. Perhaps it is also related to the yeast used.

TeaTruck
02-27-2004, 03:35 AM
The Kit had you add metabisulfite BEFORE fermenting?

Lots of recipes call for sulphite before fermenting. See Boil or sulfite?:
http://www.gotmead.com/index.php?option=com_smf&Itemid=103&board=Natural;action=display;num=1066172959;start=

I wouldn't use it again next time though. After reading that thread, I'm not convinced it's necessary, and the folk at the brew store figure it was likely the cause of the delayed fermentation--Especially if they mixed too much of it in the kit. I never asked them about the smell though. It went away before I got around to it.

JoeM
02-27-2004, 07:10 AM
I know that sulfites are commonly used to chemically pasturize, in fact i've done it myself...i just wanted to clairfy that thats what the kit had you do and not use k meta to stabilize AFTER fermentation. In response to your querstion about k meta causeing the smell i've never had that experience, in response to it slowing your fermentation, did you wait at least 24 hours AFTER adding the k meta befroe pitching? beucase if not then it most certainly did cause the slow start. And no it certainly is not necessary, i've made meads by bioling, heat pasturizing, sulfite pasturizing, and not pasturizing at all...and in my experience i am most happy with the heat pasturizing method (or just dump and stir but i'm always afraid something will go wrong with this method)

JoeM
02-27-2004, 07:17 AM
Thirsty Viking...i'm just curious only because i know that what i have experienced with ciders is a very common experience. Have you ever stuck your nose in the airlock of a cider that has been fermenting for about 3 days or so? (Of course i'm assuming you have, i guess that sounds like a terribly silly question). the only reason i ask suck a rediculous question is because i know its a well reported phenomenon. But again as you pointed out about the yeast there are just so many variables, who knows why one person experiences something and someone else finds something completely different.

This is just a random thread on another forum but i did a quick search just to prove to myself that i'm not crazy!

http://www.tastybrew.com/forum/thread/6900

TeaTruck
02-27-2004, 10:31 AM
The kit included k-meta for both chemical pasturization, and--along with potassium sorbate--for stabilising, but I haven't stabilized yet. I did indeed wait 24 hours before pitching. Closer to 30, because I got tied up at work. Anyway, it was only a wild guess that it might be the source of the smell. No foundation in experience or science. I'm just pleased that the smell has improved.

Rurouni85Samurai
02-27-2004, 03:45 PM
At first mine smelled like white wine for 4 days which had me worried a bit, was thinking with that much sugar it should be sweater. Now I can eat sugar out of the air, but I can't place the smell.

ThistyViking
02-28-2004, 03:40 AM
I've never made a plain cider, but it's still all applejuice and honey in my cysers, I do not typically add k-meta before fermentation. I do not add yeast energizer/nutirent to cyser either, instead I rely on the Apple juice nutrients.

As far as the smell, I primary ferment in my pantry with the door closed and so get a concetrated whiff every time I go to cook. Also an oddity of my house... the place that the smell escapes is into the stairwell that leads to the garrage giving me a shot of the nose anytime I leave or return.

Hidalgo
03-05-2004, 12:54 AM
I've never made a plain cider, but it's still all applejuice and honey in my cysers, I do not typically add k-meta before fermentation. I do not add yeast energizer/nutirent to cyser either, instead I rely on the Apple juice nutrients.


That's what I have done with my first batch. I took your advice so the only thing I put in the primary was apple juice, honey, and yeast. According to the taste and the smell, it seems to be coming along just fine.