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Jmattioli
08-14-2004, 07:42 PM
This is one I have shared before but it may have got lost in the rebuild. It is so simple to make and you can make it without much equipment and with a multitude of variations. This could be a first Mead for the novice as it is almost fool proof. It is a bit unorthodox but it has never failed me or the friends I have shared it with.


1 gallon batch

3 1/2 lbs Clover or your choice honey or blend (will finish sweet)
1 Large orange (later cut in eights or smaller rind and all)
1 small handful of raisins (25 if you count but more or less ok)
1 stick of cinnamon
1 whole clove ( or 2 if you like - these are potent critters)
optional (a pinch of nutmeg and allspice )( very small )
1 teaspoon of Fleismanns bread yeast ( now don't get holy on me--- after all this is an ancient mead and that's all we had back then)
Balance water to one gallon

Process:

Use a clean 1 gallon carboy
Yes, CLEAN means no germs. Bacteria is the enemy of good mead. First make sure there is no dirt or other ingredients caked on the inside. If there is, clean it out with dishwater soap and water and a bottle brush. Then rinse well. Then fill carboy with 1 tablespoon of unscented bleach and clean water. Let it set at least 20 minutes to disinfect and then rinse out well with plenty of water so that the bleach doesnít impart a flavor our mead. This should be easy and only take a couple rinseings as long as you donít exceed 1 Tablespoon per gallon.

Dissolve the required honey in 1 Ĺ quarts of warm water, making sure it is mixed well and pour in the carboy. Yes, you can use a funnel but make sure it is clean and disinfected. For this you can crush up 1 Campden tablet and mix with a cup of warm water to use to disinfect any needed items like the rubber bung and the funnel and any spoons you use for stirring the honey. Or you can use a bleach mixture like you did for the carboy with 1 Tablespoon per gallon. Remember to rinse off bleach mixture from items with clean tap water before using.

Wash orange well to remove any pesticides and slice in eights --add orange (you can push em through opening big boy -- rinds included -- its ok for this mead -- take my word for it -- ignore the experts)

Put in raisins, clove, cinnamon stick, any optional ingredients and fill to 3 inches from the top with cold water. ( need room for some foam -- you can top off with more water after the first few day frenzy)

Shake the heck out of the jug with top on, of course. This is your sophisticated aeration process that provides needed oxygen in the mixture or as we in mead making call the Must. Oxygen at this point is important but once fermentation gets under way, oxygen will be our enemy.


When at room temperature in your kitchen. Put in 1 teaspoon of bread yeast. ( No you don't have to rehydrate it first-- the ancients didn't even have that word in their vocabulary-- just put it in and give it a gentle swirl or not)( the yeast can fight for their own territory)

Install water airlock. Don't forget to put in a little water in it. duh! Put in dark place. Yeast is a fungi which is a single cell organism that grows and operates more efficiently in the dark. It also prefers cooler temperatures typical of a basement but for this mead, anywhere between 65F and 80 will be fine. The warmer the temperature the faster will be the fermentation with this yeast. It will start working immediately or in an hour. (Don't use grandma's bread yeast she bought years before she passed away in the 90's)( Wait 3 hours before you panic or call me) After major foaming stops in a few days add some water and then keep your hands off of it. (Don't shake it! Don't mess with them yeastees! Let them alone except its okay to open your cabinet to smell every once in a while.

Racking --- Don't you dare
additional feeding --- NO NO
More stirring or shaking -- Your not listening, don't touch

After 2 months and maybe a few days it will slow down to a stop and clear all by itself. If the temperature is in the 70's it finish even faster You don't have to do a thing but watch and smell (How about that) (You are not so important after all) Then you can put a hose in with a small cloth filter on the end into the clear part and syphon off the golden nectar. If you wait long enough even the oranges will sink to the bottom but I never waitied that long. If it is clear it is ready. You don't need a cold basement. It does better in a kitchen in the dark. (like in a cabinet) likes a little heat (70-80). If it didn't work out... you screwed up and didn't read my instructions (or used grandma's bread yeast she bought years before she passed away) . If it didn't work out then take up another hobby. Mead is not for you. It is too complicated. ;)
If you were sucessful, which I am 99% certain you will be, then enjoy your mead. When you get ready to make a different mead you will probably have to unlearn some of these practices I have taught you, but hey--- This recipe and procedure works with these ingredients so don't knock it. It was your first mead. It was my tenth. Sometimes, even the experts can forget all they know and make a good ancient mead.
Enjoy, Joe
P.S. Please see important authors note to this post on page 5 of this thread.

WikdWaze
08-15-2004, 04:02 AM
Doesn't sound bad, and it's definitely my skill-level ;D I'm going to stick with plan A, though. My experience with commercial mead taught me to pursue my own taste.

Jmattioli
08-15-2004, 07:14 AM
WikdWaze,
OK thats fine. I can understand that. I just thought that since this mead will get you 4 bottles for less than the price of what you payed for 1 bottle of Chancers and you preferred it sweeter and with more complexity of taste; you might enjoy this one better while you are waiting for your own recipe to finish. The honey is available at Sam's for less than $10 and the rest of the igredients are household spices and grocery store yeast. It only requires (1) 1 gal jug and airlock. Don't let the simplicity lower your expectations. (Its surprisingly delicious) Anyway, its here for anyone to try. I still make it for Christmas gifts to friends and I hope you at least enjoyed reading the recipe.
Joe

JamesP
08-15-2004, 07:15 AM
Joe,

you've wet my curiosity, so I think I'll give it a go (when things warm up down-under).
I'm not sure I can keep myself from meddling with it - tho' there must be a first time for everything ;)


I note that you suggest not over-doing the nutmeg or allspice. Is this because of the harsh flavour it gives, that takes a long time to smooth out?

Jmattioli
08-15-2004, 07:23 AM
Joe,
you've wet my curiosity, so I think I'll give it a go (when things warm up down-under).
I'm not sure I can keep myself from meddling with it - tho' there must be a first time for everything ;)
I note that you suggest not over-doing the nutmeg or allspice. Is this because of the harsh flavour it gives, that takes a long time to smooth out?
James,
Well the recipe as written is ready to drink when clear and doesn't require additional aging though it gets smoother with age. A little of these spices go a long way and I find beginners usually think that if one is good then two is better. The problem is that it doesn't work that way. Too much of anything can throw it out of balance just like too much or too little of a particular meat in a submarine sandwich. However, all do not share my beliefs as I notice some people put in more than 5 cloves in a gallon. That is their particular taste but for most it is too overpowering.
Joe

Norskersword
08-15-2004, 10:31 PM
I would really like to try your recipe. I will have to put it on my "to make" list since I think being a newbie and all I need to try certain other flavors first. I think I would appreciate this recipe more if the next batch I made was a plain traditional wildflower batch. As far as flavors go, I need to work my way up to that point I think, even if it is easy to make.

As for cloves, I may even do a half a clove for a one gallon batch.

I have a few questions for you though. What is the ABV of the finished product? And since it is drinkable when clear (being new I love that idea) how long does it take to finish from the time you pitch the yeast to the time it hits the glass/horn/Oskaar mug? A month or so?

Maybe I will do this for christmas. This sounds like it would be interesting to try warm on a cold day as well.

Jmattioli
08-16-2004, 01:12 AM
(snip)
I have a few questions for you though. What is the ABV of the finished product? And since it is drinkable when clear (being new I love that idea) how long does it take to finish from the time you pitch the yeast to the time it hits the glass/horn/Oskaar mug? A month or so?

About 14-15% ABV and sweet. Two months and a few days. Varies with temperature. The spices and the sweetness mask the harshness of a young mead so you can put it in your horn right away but it does get better. Its great for sipping on a cold winter night.
Joe

Norskersword
08-16-2004, 01:14 AM
Very interesting, I like those numbers. I'll give it a shot.

Derf
08-16-2004, 10:23 AM
When Joe first posted this recipe, before the crash n' rebuild, he was so enthusiastic about it that I just had to give it a try. By now, I've made two batches of it, and each has finished and been drinkable in three weeks, though they improve quite a bit if you leave them for six. That is still one of the quickest meads I know of.

I find the cinnamon very strong, and the cloves not so much. My girlfriend and her girlfriend love it (gentlemen, take note) so I make it as is. Otherwise, I think I would use less of the former and more of the latter.

All the ingredients AND all the equipment for this recipe cost me no more than $25 Canadian, so none of you have any excuse for not giving this a try. Fool proof, said the fool.

Jmattioli
08-16-2004, 07:23 PM
Derf,
I looked at the recipe in my second batch of 3 gallons and I noticed I did double up on the cloves (and left in the kitchen instead of the basement) this time. It took 5 weeks . Temperature and water hardness may make quite a difference in ferment times but like you said its basically fool proof. Hopefully, as people try it they will improve on it like adding a little vanilla or something. Also they can decrease the honey a bit if its too sweet for them, though it is a good place to start from so they can make a more personal taste judgement according to their likes after the first 1 gallon batch. At what temperature did your ferment take place and I am curious on what water you used to get such a fast ferment? (hard, soft, spring, etc.)
Joe

Derf
08-17-2004, 11:45 PM
The fast fermentation was mainly due to elevated temperatures. It was very warm when I made the second batch and it's the one that finished in three weeks. Probably up around 25 degrees C... let me see... that's... nearly 80 degrees F.

The water was just ordinary city tap water here in Halifax. Fleishman's bread yeast. We used a bit more honey (3 pounds works out to 1.36Kg, and we used 1.5Kg). Also, I think my girlfriend put in 15 rasins, 2 cloves and the orange. As I say, I would put in still more cloves, and chop the cinnamon stick in half, but I make this one for her.

Oskaar
08-18-2004, 12:06 AM
Great recipe Joe!

Looks like a winner to me. I'm going to have some small bottles on hand as I will be making a 10 gal cyser batch next week. So once I have the cyser cranked out I can get a couple of bottles and go to town on the ancient stuff.

I may get holy and use the Lalvin yeast though! LOL I'll probably use some coriander and smidge of sweet paprika for the spices. I love that combination.

Oskaar

Jmattioli
08-18-2004, 01:13 AM
The fast fermentation was mainly due to elevated temperatures. It was very warm when I made the second batch and it's the one that finished in three weeks. Probably up around 25 degrees C... let me see... that's... nearly 80 degrees F.

That great info Jay,
Not that many may care but obviously the higher temperature of 80F promotes a much more rapid fermentaion with Fleischmanns yeast. Three weeks for Ancient mead... that a record. Mine got shorter when I did the 2nd batch in the kitchen which was 73 versus 68 in my basement.
Oskaar, you will have to rename the drink after you use that different yeast. That's too futuristic for an ancient mead. :)
You'll probably rack it too :) following too many rules for a renagade such as yourself. :D
Joe

Norskersword
08-18-2004, 01:35 AM
"Futuristic Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead" ;D

Oskaar
08-18-2004, 03:22 AM
I'll keep it ancient by using an ancient amphora flask from the Adriatic to pitch the yeast, and I'll chant ancient incantations while racking to a drinking vessel!

LOL

Oskaar

lbaker
09-15-2004, 09:42 PM
I started a modified (and updated) version of Joe's Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead over the weekend, and I must say... It smells WONDERFUL! :D It's real hard to keep from dipping my mug in the bucket every time I walk into the fermentation room (second bathroom). Hopefully I'll be able to hold out until it's cleared and bottled! I'm definitely glad Joe decided to share this recipe!

Lyle

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
09-19-2004, 12:44 PM
Joe... this one sounds like the batch I'm doing now... my first. But I have tea in it and you've put raisins in it... is this the tannin part? I think I might prefer the raisins instead of the black tea.
Also the recipe I used called for a handfull of cloves and a handfull of allspice... almost sounds like too much compared to your recipe.
Thanks tho...
Suzy Q Brewmistress :-*

JoeM
09-19-2004, 03:12 PM
just curious...how many cloves did you use in how much mead? in fact what was your recipe?

Talon
09-19-2004, 06:37 PM
The raisins actually add an all natural nutrient for the yeast to enjoy, so this would be an alternative to yeast nutrient you buy at the brew store. Or at least that's how it's been explained to me...

Talon.

Oskaar
09-20-2004, 03:43 AM
Talon has it right, the raisins add a vialble level of nutrient to the recipe from what I understand, and also give it another dimension to the taste complexity. A "rounder" mouthfeel as some would say.

I just made a cyser using raisins and dates, but still had the nutrient and energizer added.

Next mass batch I make I'll also add some dried black currants, and some dried cherries; and eliminate the nutrient and energizer.

Joe's recipe sounds excellent, and I'm going to make one too. Being the rebel that I am, I'll be using red star bread yeast instead of Fleishmann's! LOL

Oskaar - Rebel without a clue! . . . Legend in his own mind

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
09-20-2004, 07:03 AM
Hi guys....
My recipe was "Ye Olde Batt's Proven Recipe" It's a 1 gallon recipe.... I made it into a 3 gallon batch. It calls for a palmful of cloves....I used a palmful which I then measure as half a tablespoon.... exact count I'm not sure... I'll do that next time.
This was my first batch of mead... I made it on Sat. the 18th of Sept. I think I'll start Joe's recipe as a comparison batch.
Ye Olde Batt's batch I'm making now is perking away (fermenting) at about a bubble every three seconds. Does that sound normal? It's not a fast action ferment....I made a yeast starter... I used the Fleishmann's bread yeast.. which it said was ok for this recipe too. Bathroom temp is about 70-75 F.

:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

JoeM
09-20-2004, 08:30 AM
the bubbling sounds fine. i was just curious as to how many cloves you used because i've had some bad experiences with them in the past. personally...it sounds like you used a heck of a lot of cloves for my taste, but thats just my opinion of course.

Oskaar
09-20-2004, 10:20 AM
Sounds like a lot of cloves to me too. I figure one - two cloves per gallon when I spice a mead, so a small handfull sounds like a lot unless someone has really small hands.

You know what they say about small hands and mead! The smaller your hands the less mead you can hold at once! ;)

Oskaar

Jmattioli
09-24-2004, 12:39 AM
Hi Gang,
Glad to see all the activity on the ancient mead. There is no tannin needed in this mead. Tea usually replaces tannin and raisins replaces nutrients. The orange provides the acid. More than a few cloves per gallon is only for the brave at heart. If you start with the basic recipe which is proven time and time again you will get the hang of modifying it for your discriminating taste and you can vary the honey for sweetness. Let us know how it turns out for you.
Joe

Jmattioli
09-24-2004, 07:21 AM
Hi guys....
I'm gonna do up a batch of this Ancient recipe this weekend. 1 gal size.
As to my 3 gal.. Olde Batte's Recipe... I was afraid I've added too much cloves. After 5 days... 9/22 - I thought I'd take a sample down to work for pH testing and possibly acid testing. (I work in a concentrate juice plant.)
Yes, most definitely too many cloves for the average taste. Don't worry about the acid testing with honey. PH is sufficient.


So.... while I had some out... I again tested the SG... it was now 1.020... it started out at 1.065
pH is 2.94 - kinda low doncha think.
Most definitely too low. More like a beer.


and Acid... I'm not sure of how to test the acid in honey.. I can do it for juices... using tartaric or citric or malic tables. Which would honey be?
Forget about the acid. You won't need to add any for sure.


I also tasted it.... whoa... :P, a bit strong in the flavorings.. kinda harsh. I'm thinking of racking this weekend to another carboy to get it off any sediments and then perhaps topping it off with more honey/water. Will this sweeten the must ? Will it ferment faster ? What should I expect ? :-/ It will be one week old. It is still in the main floor bathroom and I intend to keep it there until the middle of October. Can I rack it once a week, topping off with honey/water to sweeten it up and possible help it to clear ?
Oh.. yeah - hear me experienced ones and give me advice.

:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress in training I should be
Yes double the amount of honey you used to get 1.065, Yes, Expect it to take 4 weeks or so, Use patience (let the yeastees do their work and wait til they tell you it is time for racking) and notice there is no need to rack so often as it will do more harm than good. (more opportunities for bacteria and problems) Re-read the ancient recipe and count the rackings (Zero, went straight from primary to bottle) If you must, rack it now and remove the cloves and allspice if you can. And add the additional honey and then just watch it til it is finished fermenting and then rack off the lees. Hopefully removing the cloves and allspice at this point will make it more drinkable later. This addition of honey and water will also serve to raise the PH a bit for faster fermentation.
Hope this helps.
Joe

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
09-25-2004, 05:00 AM
Thanks Joe.
I am gonna rack it this afternoon... There aren't any cloves in the must as we speak.. it went from pot straight into a 3 gal carboy by syphon and no cloves, cinnamon, orange & peel. It's one week old now... I'll let it sit and leave it alone (if I can) ;) while it continues. I don't expect it to be completely drinkable until about the end of Dec.. so I'm really in no rush.
:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
09-25-2004, 06:51 AM
Alrightythen... ;D
I've racked my Olde Batte's into a new 3 gal carboy and a 1 gal glass jar. I filled (by syphon) the carboy only 3/4 of the way full and topped it off (syphoned) with more honey/water.... and since it is heavier it sank to the bottom. So I stirred it with my racking cane. Tested SG (1.030) and tasted... better but not best.
I syphoned some more out and put the extra in the gallon jar... added more honey/water - stirred -.... tested SG (1.050) and tasted... sweeter yet but not the sweetest. I didn't want to mess with it further so I added the rest of the honeywater to the gallon jar... tested it.. SG (1.100) and tasted... mmm sweet.
Capped the carboy with the airlock.... it is perking only 1 every 10-12 seconds (right away).. capped the gallon jug with a papertowel & loose lid.
Now my question about the yeast.... I originally added 3.5 Tble spoons to the 3 gal carboy... by splitting this original batch and adding more honey... is there enough yeastie beasties to work?
By adding the extra honey.. have I given the yeasties more food and therefore will ferment better?
What should I expect?
What can I expect with the one gallon jug... loose lid - no airlock?

Don't let me overwhelm you with questions... ;) I'm having fun and if this first batch is a bit on the pucker side.. that's ok.. I'll learn from the experience.

:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

Jmattioli
09-25-2004, 09:01 AM
1t of bread yeast per gallon is sufficient. Give it some time or since you racked and changed it a bit add 1 teaspoon. That should be more than enough. Add a handful of raisins to the batch for nutrients. That will help fermentation greatly and improve your mead. You can leave them in till fermentation is complete. They will not make a mess and should go to the bottom if you wait long enough.
Oh -- and get an airlock for the 1 gallon jug as soon as you can. No sense introducing oxygen at this point. If you can't get one soon, use a ballon with a pin hole in it til you can get an airlock.
Hope this helps,
Joe

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
09-26-2004, 05:18 AM
Thanks Joe....
It is now this aft. perking about every 2.5 seconds... but I'll add one little tsp of yeast and a handfull of raisins too.
The airlock for the gallon will hafta be a latex glove... powder free with a pinhole.
On another thought.... when adding fruit to a mead mix... has dried fruit ever been used?

:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

Jmattioli
09-26-2004, 09:20 AM
With dried fruit you have to watch out for added sulfurs. Use natural sun dried raisins and dried fruit without additives. Not too many people use dried fruits for meads though they will rehydrate in the mead and work without adverse effects as long as they are naturally dried and free of chemicals. After all, people do use dry spices with good results. However, purists seem to prefer only fresh natural fruits and for good reasons.
Joe

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
10-05-2004, 07:45 AM
My Olde Batt's is 18 days old.... is has only ever perked about every 2.5-3 seconds.... I added the raisins & yeast as Joe said back on the 25th of Sept...
Today (8:00 am) I racked it one last time... (I know, I know... leave it alone... but there's something about fruit floating atop a murky liquid that bothered me... ) I tested SG...1.070 and tasted.... reminds me of a sweet pungeont gin... pine needles... not too pleasant at the moment... but then again I'm a gin & grapefruit drinker so who knows... maybe it's tollerable. (I think too much cloves at the start although they were only in it during the initial heating of the must)
This evening (6:00pm) it is slowly perking about every 4 seconds. But I think I'll still let it bulk age until the end of Dec. I'm also moving it to a cooler part of the house... the basement. It should be about in the low to mid 60's during the days to the mid 50's at night. Gonna leave it alone then... yup that's what I'm gonna do. :)

G'night guys... :-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

Jmattioli
10-05-2004, 09:29 PM
Why not leave it in the warmer temperature til it stops perking and then age it in the cooler temperature. It might get the SG down into a more respectable range. 1.070 is way to sweet except for sugar lovers. Cooler temperatures now will slow down or stop fermentation especially with bread yeast.
Susy Q, We are going to have to tie your hands behind your back. Floating fruit is good. By the way, I racked my first mead at day 2, day 7, day 17, day 27, day 57, day 87, day 112, then left alone for 8 months. (It needed the 8 months to be drinkable)
Somehow it unbelievably made it through my excessive handling. I now rack meads 2 times on the average. Once when fermentation is complete and once when clear. Don't boil, don't sulfite (except at bottling if I will store for a while or if sweetening), use none or minimal nutrients and 90% of my meads are drinkable 2 months after they are started. Never had an infection and don't know how that was possible with my first one.
So now you know the rest of the story......

Joe

Oskaar
10-06-2004, 01:07 AM
I agree with Joe, Suzy.

Let it sit until is stops perking and then put it into a cooler area for aging!

Plus 1.070 is pretty doggone sweet . . . even for me!

Oskaar

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
10-06-2004, 07:35 AM
Alright.... will lug her back up stairs.... put her back in the bathtub and leave her alone....
I didn't think SG 1.070 would be very sweet.... after tasting it yesterday... it left a lingering burn in my throut most of the night. Not as sweet & smooth as I had expected.
I have found that in general.. Americans are not very patient. They want it and they want it NOW... like Varouka from Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory. So I being a typical American... and a woman to boot... I will have to practice my patience.
:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

Jmattioli
10-06-2004, 08:00 AM
Suzy,
You can't expect it to be drinkable in the middle of fermention. We'll you could but thats not reasonable with the amount of spices you put in. You will be amazed at the difference you will taste when it is done (no more bubbles until you lose your patience waiting) and then after a month or so aging in your cool basement. Hopefully it will finish in the SG 1.030 area which will be plenty sweet after it mellows. Excuse me, I forgot how desperate we get with our first batch. :D
By the way did u start a batch of my ancient orange C & C to run in parallel with this one as you mentioned previously?
Joe

PanzerBjorn
10-09-2004, 05:16 AM
Hi Joe,
I want to try your recipe but I don't have cinnamon sticks, only the pre-ground kind. Will that work? and about how many Tbl spoons will be equivalent to one stick?

Jmattioli
10-09-2004, 05:58 AM
Good question. Never did it that way but it definitely wouldn't be Tablespoons. More like 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon per 5 gallons so I would put in 1/4t of ground cinnamon at the most for 1 gallon. People tend to overdue it with spices. I'm certain 1/4t would get you near the same effect as I get with 1 cinnamon stick. You can even put it in a tea bag if you wish. I sometimes make my own from coffee filters.
Putting in more than the 1/4t would overpower the orange, clove, raisins and honey taste. And the balance is what makes this simple ancient mead so good.
Joe

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
10-09-2004, 06:11 AM
Hi Guys....
Well... my 3 gallon Olde Batte's is upstairs again... perking slow but steady.... 10 - 14 sec. apart. I will be patient. I will be patient. I will be patient.
I am in the middle of Grape Harvest at work... 7 days a week... 9.5 hours a day. So I've not started the Ancient Orange C&C. I also didn't have an 1 gallon container yet either until last night. So any day now.

:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
10-11-2004, 08:22 AM
I got home from work this am... (graveyard shift) ... and started this little mead... the Ancient Orange C&C. Then I went to bed.
After I got up I added the (bread) yeast... tested the SG before adding yeast and it was 1.140. In the process... spilled a bit of my sample... got it on my log book... now I have a sticky log/recipe book. Does this sound familiar to any one? :).
Now... while reading other notes.. I notice there is no tea in this recipe. I didn't add any and I promise I will leave it alone. But... what supplies the tannin in this mead???
:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

Jmattioli
10-11-2004, 09:09 AM
Suzy,
The raisins supply both nutrients and tannin among other things. Remember that raisins are really dried grapes and grape skins have tannin.
Joe

P.S. And yes, don't touch--- just smell :D

Oskaar
10-11-2004, 12:18 PM
Hey Panzer,

If you live in an area where there are Mexican markets you can find some cinnamon tea (usually canela) which is pretty powerful stuff. You could try limited steeping time in your mead with one of the teabags.

Oskaar

David Baldwin
10-11-2004, 07:00 PM
Joe,

Have you ever done this in a 3 gallon batch? I'm wondering if trippling the recipe will work as well as it does in the 1 gallon batch.

I've already got 3 gallon carboys begging for use, and I"d have to come up with a 1 galllon jug if I do it by the original recipe.

... of course "shaking the daylights" out of a 3 gallon carboy could be something for Americas Funniest Videos...

Jmattioli
10-11-2004, 08:22 PM
Joe,

Have you ever done this in a 3 gallon batch? I'm wondering if trippling the recipe will work as well as it does in the 1 gallon batch.

I've already got 3 gallon carboys begging for use, and I"d have to come up with a 1 galllon jug if I do it by the original recipe.(snip)

As a matter of fact, Yes, I have. Batch #19. From my notes, the only thing I did differently was use 9 lbs of clover and 1 lb of buckwheat and put in 3 oz of Watkins double strength Vanilla when it was finished. Otherwise, I followed same instructions except I used 2 cloves per gallon instead of my one in previous tries. It was done in exactly 6 weeks from start to clear without racking. The yeast likes warmer temperatures. I did it in a kitchen cabinet where it was 74 degrees. Smells wonderful while making. Got 12 large and 2 half bottles of clear mead. Waiting for Christmas to break open.
Joe

David Baldwin
10-11-2004, 09:52 PM
Thanks Joe I'll start a 3 gallon batch this week.

... by the way... how did you "shake the heck" out of a 3 gallon carboy??? ;D

I assume that I could combine ingredients in my primary bucket and aerate there before pouring/racking into the carboy...???

Jmattioli
10-11-2004, 10:37 PM
That will work. I actually did shake it in the 3 gallon carboy. Looked kind of funny but worked well with a tight hold on the ends and being very careful.
Joe

Oskaar
10-11-2004, 10:43 PM
Um I have an idea!

Bikini models shaking those carboys for all they're worth. I think there would be a pretty wide male demographic for a spot on the Superbowl! It could happen!

Where's my producer???

Oskaar

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
10-12-2004, 07:59 AM
Oskaar.....
I'm ashamed of you.... making those skinny little bikini models shake 3 gallon carboys.... they wouldn't have the strength. ;D
Now a woman with meat on her bones could do the mead justice..... ;)
Don't sacrifice your meadmaking with a pitiful aeration technique... just for the scenery.

Love to all... :-* Suzy Q Brewmistress

Oskaar
10-12-2004, 01:15 PM
No need to be ashamed! Join in the fun ;D

Oskaar

David Baldwin
10-20-2004, 07:26 AM
Joe,

I started my 3 gallon batch tonight. I had to measure my honey by volume rather than weight, so I'm close, but how close I don't know.

My SG is about 1.120 is that about right for this?

Jmattioli
10-20-2004, 08:54 AM
Alittle lower than mine but will probably be better as it can be too sweet for some if you used more.
Joe

lbaker
10-25-2004, 07:33 PM
Well, my Almost Ancient Orange, Cinnamon & Clove mead is CLEAR! I'm going to get the bottles clean up and sanitized tonight and it should go in the bottle tomorrow night. I tasted a sample about 2 weeks ago, and it was quite pleasant then, and I imagine even better now. The timing is excellent since I'm having a Halloween party this weekend! I plan to introduce a bunch of people that have never had mead to both my Cyser and this almost Ancient OCC mead.

(Thanks for the recipe Joe!)

Lyle

http://www.moremead.com/mead_logs/20040914_OCC.html

aghori
11-02-2004, 07:29 AM
Well I've joined the club and have made the ancient orange cinnamon & clove mead.

I mixed 3 lb of clover and 1/2 lb orange blossom honey. Recipe ... Joe's to the letter.

I hope this would be ready for new years!!!

Jmattioli
11-02-2004, 08:03 AM
I hope this would be ready for new years!!!
Guaranteed! If you followed directions to the tee.
Joe

aghori
11-02-2004, 04:28 PM
This is a thing of beauty. The 3-4 inches on top of the glass jar is filled with foam and the airlock goes once every 15 - 20 seconds or so.

This is so easy compared to the other batch of dry mead I'm making and is so simple to make its beautiful.

Aggie4You
11-05-2004, 12:31 AM
I started mine last night with a few slight modifications

I used Lalvin 1116 (it's all I had available)
I added an extra 1/2 lb of honey (because of the yeast used... I'm not sure it will be enough though... we'll see)
I used 3 cloves (what can I say, I'm a glutton for punishment).

I was going to take an OG reading, but it turns out my wife accidentally broke my hydrometer... I've got another one (3 actually) coming.

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
11-10-2004, 05:13 AM
My Joe's Ancient OC&C is about a month old now... I did an SG & taste test on all my meads batches (7) yesterday...
My Ancient OC&C
Fleishman's Bread Yeast
10-11-04 - SG - 1.140
11-09-04 - SG - 1.050 est. Brix 13
Should be a med/sweet

My husband and I both agree... of all the batches, even the oldest batch... this one is by far the smoothest one yet. It still has the Alch. taste, but it is so smooth.

Thanks again Jmattioli.

:-* Suzy Q, Brewmistress

David Baldwin
11-10-2004, 06:44 AM
Suzy_Q

Has yours cleared arlread?

I started mine October 20. I didn't have enough honey in it, so I decided to stop fermentation at SG 1.02.

I chilled the carboy, and stopped fermentation with sorbate and metabisulphite.

My batch is showing signs of starting to clear. The oranges have all sunk to the bottom, and some of the raisins have as well.

Suzy_Q_Brewmistres
11-11-2004, 08:23 AM
My Ancient OCC hasn't cleared yet... I started mine the 11th of Oct... I want it to go a couple weeks longer before I begin to chill it.

Fruit is till floating at the top... raisins fully bloated.

I wanna follow this recipe to the letter... :) .. so it's gonna sit in it's dark bag for at least another month... before I even think about racking or chilling.

:) Suzy Q

Jmattioli
11-11-2004, 07:57 PM
WAY TO GO SUZY. Unless temperature is real warm it takes 6 weeks to 2 months. No need to hurry. It will get crystal clear on its own without chilling. If you wait long enough, all the fruit and raisins will go to the bottom, making it easy to rack into bottles. Its always good to attach a coffee filter to the end of your siphon hose so as to get no solids. Works wonderfully. I usually don't wait for everything to go to the bottom. This is the least hassle mead you can make that will turn out fine everytime if you follow instructions faithfully.
Joe

David Baldwin
11-11-2004, 08:19 PM
Next time I make this recipe (hopefully very soon) I will have a scale to measure my honey by weight rather than by volume.

I thought that I had enough honey in it until I checked the SG.

It will be fun to compare the differences between the two batches.


The local winemaking supply shop is getting to know me all too well. When I walk in, they go for another carboy and airlock! ;D

Jmattioli
11-19-2004, 11:11 AM
P.S. addendum to 1 st post page 1

Authors Note:
P.S. This recipe works well and produces a very good mead that doesn't require alot of aging though it does get better with time. The procedures followed show how simple and easy mead is to make and enjoy. This recipe's purpose is to be fun, exciting and encourage you to learn more with at least one successful mead under your belt without waiting long and at a minimal entry cost. It is unorthodox in that it disregards many of the customary rules practiced by many successful mead makers. These include but are not limited to not using bread yeast, not racking off the lees, not rehydrating the yeast prior to pitching, not stirring in the yeast, not taking SG readings and using the rind of oranges without removing the pith which usually causes nasty bitterness . So as a courtesy to those concerned individuals I would like to advise you to study and learn more about mead making practices as variations of this recipe might not produce the same desired results. This is an ancient recipe and everything in this recipe works together to make a tasety mead. However, there is much more to learn before attempting some of these practices with other recipes. Being a pragmatic individual I often do the opposite of prescribed methods in search of something different and unique or to prove a contrary point. So enjoy and remember there are reasons that a beginner should learn additoinal methology before incorporating these procedures into other meads using different yeasts and different ingredients. Having said that, I hope you will be encouraged to continue your study and learning process, constantly striving to make better meads for all to enjoy.
Sincerely, Joe Mattioli

Pewter_of_Deodar
11-20-2004, 02:30 AM
Getting ready to make a batch myself...

Is the yeast labelled as bread yeast or just the regular yeast in the baking section? I could not find "bread" yeast but they had normal and fast rising yeasts of Fleischmann's brand...

I got the normal type... Is that what I need?

Oskaar
11-20-2004, 02:57 AM
That's the stuff!

PSanderson
11-25-2004, 05:22 PM
Joe,

Jumping in on this thread late but wanted to say thanks, just made your recipe it's 3Gal but followed your instructions to the letter - it's my second mead ever.

I'll let you know how it goes, but based on everyones feedback I'm expecting good things.

Now - I need to take your advice - don't touch and be patient!

Cheers,
Peter

Dan McFeeley
11-25-2004, 08:17 PM
. . . This is an ancient recipe and everything in this recipe works together to make a tasety mead.

Ok, I'll bite. How ancient is it? :D

Jmattioli
11-26-2004, 08:10 AM
Ok, I'll bite. How ancient is it? :D

Oh! , About a year or so. It's a revisit to ancient times (belonging to times long past especially of the historical period before the fall of the Western Roman Empire) with the exception of the yeast. That's why they call it Joe's Ancient Mead. Because at least one or the other qualifies as ancient. We just don't really know for sure if it is Joe or the Mead! ;D
Joe

Pewter_of_Deodar
11-28-2004, 08:43 PM
McFeeley,

"How ancient is it?"

Well... Joe first started making it when he was running around with the legions in Gaul... ::)

With a huge grin,
Pewter

scottlind
12-19-2004, 07:15 AM
my batch is now 5 weeks old and crystal clear. i think it is a little to orange bitter tasting. is there something i can do or add to lighten the orange rind taste?
i used 5 large oranges in a five gallon batch, maybe it was to much or they were to big or not ripe enough.
anyway.... any suggestions besides aging longer, i would like to drink some at christmas.
scott

Jmattioli
12-19-2004, 11:10 PM
Idaho,
Sweetness offsets the bite of the orange. Where did it finish at? SG? You can sweeten it a bit with honey or just wait a few weeks. It mellows quickly. Be tough, remember you are Viking material. A little bitterness is good.
Seriously, If it finished lower than 1.020 then it should be sweetened up a bit. Otherwise, just a short time will do wonders. It is a young mead.
Joe

scottlind
12-20-2004, 12:48 AM
it's .025 on the nose and very clear. i racked it to a clean carboy and replaced the lock. i still get a bubble about every 5 minutes or so.

i have not added anything to it.

i'll drink a vial on the 24th and check it out, might just have to wait a couple more weeks and drink store bought mead :-X

Jmattioli
12-20-2004, 03:37 AM
Sweetness is perfect. Just wait a couple weeks.
Joe

da_rambler20
05-10-2007, 11:37 PM
While I'm waiting for my first batch of mead to finish, I want to make a batch of JAO.

My only question is this: Do I have to worry about bottle bombs with this recipe? Or if I let it totally clear after the 2+ month period, will that be enough time to just bottle? I can't see having to add any sulphite or sorbate in this since it's an "ancien" recipe.

Thanks again.

Jason

sandman
05-11-2007, 12:52 AM
Bottle bombs shouldn't be an issue with this recipe. It's a still mead, not a sparkling mead. Don't prime the bottles before filling them and you should be fine. Of course that's as long as the mead has finished fermenting. If it's clear, it's all over except for the aging.

da_rambler20
05-11-2007, 01:33 AM
Bottle bombs shouldn't be an issue with this recipe. It's a still mead, not a sparkling mead. Don't prime the bottles before filling them and you should be fine. Of course that's as long as the mead has finished fermenting. If it's clear, it's all over except for the aging.


That's what I figured. Just as long as it was given time to clear on it's own, it would be fine. Thanks again sandman.

da_rambler20
05-11-2007, 01:36 PM
I just whipped up a batch of this JAO and once I was done adding everything and aerating it, I realized that I added 4lbs of honey, not 3 1/2 lbs. Is this going to be a problem? Do I need to add a little more yeast when I do or will this wine just be sweeter and take longer to ferment? Hopefully somone can answer in the next hour or so. Thanks again. Jason

Kwatt
05-11-2007, 06:53 PM
It will finish sweeter than normal.

Adding more of the same yeast will not change anything.

I shorted a batch by half a pound once. I hardly noticed a difference.

da_rambler20
05-11-2007, 06:59 PM
Great thanks. I can rest easy then. I checked on it about an hour after dumping the yeast in and gently swirling it aroung and it was beginning to bubble a little bit in the airlock and there was some foam on top of the fruit that was floating on top. Now I just wait. Thanks again.

Kwatt
05-11-2007, 08:15 PM
Resting easy may be a good idea right about now.
Once it is finished and you taste it you may not want to take time to rest.
That's providing you can rest once you start smelling IT!

Just opened a bottle of the first JAO I made, it is only ~six months old.
And it is just satisfyingly excellent.

da_rambler20
05-11-2007, 08:19 PM
I know what you mean. It smelled great when I was making it...the honey and citrus. This is a test batch. If all works well, I may multiply the recipe to make a 5 gallon batch. It definitely was alot easier to make than the first one I made back in march. I racked it last week and still waiting to clear.

da_rambler20
05-17-2007, 08:20 PM
WAY TO GO SUZY. Unless temperature is real warm it takes 6 weeks to 2 months. No need to hurry. It will get crystal clear on its own without chilling. If you wait long enough, all the fruit and raisins will go to the bottom, making it easy to rack into bottles. Its always good to attach a coffee filter to the end of your siphon hose so as to get no solids. Works wonderfully. I usually don't wait for everything to go to the bottom. This is the least hassle mead you can make that will turn out fine everytime if you follow instructions faithfully.
Joe


How do you attach a coffee filter to the end of the siphon hose? A sanitized rubber band?

2nd: Has anyone made a 5 gal batch by just multiplying the original recipe by 5? Just curious. Also a little curious about the yeast. Just multiply that by 5 as well?

Thanks again everyone.

da_rambler20
05-31-2007, 11:29 PM
WAY TO GO SUZY. Unless temperature is real warm it takes 6 weeks to 2 months. No need to hurry. It will get crystal clear on its own without chilling. If you wait long enough, all the fruit and raisins will go to the bottom, making it easy to rack into bottles. Its always good to attach a coffee filter to the end of your siphon hose so as to get no solids. Works wonderfully. I usually don't wait for everything to go to the bottom. This is the least hassle mead you can make that will turn out fine everytime if you follow instructions faithfully.
Joe


How do you attach a coffee filter to the end of the siphon hose? A sanitized rubber band?

2nd: Has anyone made a 5 gal batch by just multiplying the original recipe by 5? Just curious. Also a little curious about the yeast. Just multiply that by 5 as well?

Thanks again everyone.


Bump to hopefully get an answer about attaching a coffee filter to sipon hose. Thanks