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Marion
05-31-2004, 07:10 PM
Ah yes, the simple meads. How many have actually tried honey, water & yeast? Just let it do its thing. No tannin, no energizer, no nutrients?

I tend to think, we being as "educated" as we are, this day in time, we seem to over do things. Sometimes, maybe, we should set the books aside, put 3lb of Clover Honey to the gallon of rain water, add our yeast of choice and just forget about it. We may be surprised.

Or, if we can't possibly bring ourselves to being this simple, use a little black tea, raisins, lemon, etc... for our additives, rather than the text-book ones.

We can make both or lives and our meads very complex, if we wish. But, I think its nice to know we can keep things relaxed, simple and at the same time, quite elegant, with the most basic procedures.

JoeM
05-31-2004, 07:27 PM
most meads i make consist of honey, water, yeast, a bit of lemon juice and some crushed red grapes...no tannin, acid, or nutrient powders. personally i think they are wonderful. I've also made meads of simply water, honey, and yeast, but in my experience the complexity of the final product benifits from a bit of acid and nutrient, be it from a bottle or from fruit.

Jmattioli
06-03-2004, 07:51 PM
I agree that a fine product can come from simplicity. I,ve made an ancient mead in a gallon jug with 3 1/2 lbs honey, a handful of raisins, 1 cinnamon stick, 2 cloves, and 1 complete orange cut into eights rind and all and pushed in jug. Add water and shake well. Then added 1 t of bread yeast and an airlock. I put it in the cubboard and forget about it for 2 months and it comes out crystal clear and great every time and quite a delicious sweet beverage good for sipping at Christmas time. If you wait long enough, all the solids will go to the bottom I am told but I just siphon out the clear stuff with a small cloth filter over the hose when it is clear.
Joe

Marion
06-07-2004, 10:10 PM
Joe, I'm must be running a similar trail as you. I too find myself starting one up, putting it in the cellar and let it be. There are few things that can have a more positive outcome on Meads, than time and patience. We can energize this and stablize that, but when everything is said and done, time & patient is the basis of a good Mead.

Jmattioli
06-08-2004, 08:02 AM
;)Yes I agree. Mead knows how to pretty well take care of itself. Most problems are not because the yeast don't know how to do their job but from our incessant disturbing of their work. Patience is definely a virtue in meadmaking and there seems to be a tendency in us to always try and rush things along. Chuck W. once gave me the best piece of advice I presently use and that is "Don't do anything until the mead speaks to you" Think about it. Mead has its own language. The yeast let you know when they are ready for racking. The meads tells you when it is bottling time. Of couse they don't speak in words but mead gives you all the feedback you need to do the right thing if you pay attention to its lessons.
Regards, Joe ;)

Oskaar
06-08-2004, 11:25 AM
I make batches of 15 gallons and the only thing in them has been yeast, water and honey.

Never been disappointed with the end-product. I did have a dubious flirtation with a yeast nutrient once in a five gallon batch, but no ill effects were suffered.

I am getting ready to try some different honeys though.

Oskaar

Marion
06-10-2004, 12:22 AM
Ah, a man of basic Mead in 15 gallon batches. My salute.

Oskaar
06-12-2004, 12:52 PM
Why, thank-ee ma'am!!

Oskaar

Oskaar
06-12-2004, 12:57 PM
Damn, my brain was on slow when I fired off the last post. I had forgotten about Marion being a gentleman's name.

Apologies for the Ma'am.

Oskaar

Marion
06-13-2004, 06:39 PM
Oskaar, no problem. But, rest assured, I'm very much the male. ;D

Whteknght
07-07-2004, 11:47 PM
The one mead I have done with chemicals has been a troublesome process. I think I prefer just honey, water, lemon juice and yeast. It's actually a better way to go.

Oskaar
07-15-2004, 04:03 AM
With you on that one Bro!

Oskaar

kace069
07-15-2004, 11:10 AM
how much lemon juice do you guys add to a 5 gallon batch? No tea? And you add it at preperation of the must correct?

SteveT
07-20-2004, 04:59 AM
One of the first meads I made was simple, and after aging 7 years, it is not absolutely incredible. I used no chemicals in this batch what-so-ever. Believe it or not I still have a couple of bottle left.

Does anyone have a source for the Beekeeping book that Brother Adam wrote?

Salude!
Steve

Oskaar
07-30-2004, 05:14 AM
Hey Steve,

I was reading your post and got confused (which is not a very rare state of mind for me)

You wrote:


One of the first meads I made was simple, and after aging 7 years, it is not absolutely incredible.

Were you saying that the mead is absolutely incredible after seven years of aging? I don't have any on hand that's lasted that long. But, since you have a couple bottles left . . . . ;D

I hope they get even better as they age!

Cheers,

Oskaar

dogglebe
08-01-2004, 06:51 AM
Were you saying that the mead is absolutely incredible after seven years of aging? I don't have any on hand that's lasted that long. But, since you have a couple bottles left .
Oskaar

After drinking my first batch, I wanted to be sure that I never ran out of mead. As a result, I brew four to five batches of mead a year (in addition to all my beer). I still have bottles of every batch I made.


Phil

WikdWaze
08-01-2004, 01:05 PM
I like this approach very much. More ingredients can only increase the possibility of an error. I am planning to very soon create my very first batch of mead and want to keep it as simple and pure as possible. I do have one question. I have heard that it takes quite a while for the yeast to start if you don't add nutrients, is this so?

Jmattioli
08-01-2004, 09:09 PM
I think you will find that the nutrients affect the tail end of fermentation more than the start. There is usually enough in the honey and hard water to get things started quickly but they sometimes run out and drag on to a slow fermentation or cause a stuck fermentation if they are insuffiecient to support a complete fermentation from a higher starting SG. I have made many batches without any nutrients except that in the honey and hard water and quick starting was never a problem. Certain yeasts require less nutrients than others.
Joe

WikdWaze
08-03-2004, 03:27 AM
Hadn't thought about that, makes sense that the nutrients would only be a factor towards the end when the yeast were most plentiful and most stressed. I think we have fairly hard water here, but not as hard as some I've seen. I've seen places where a dried towel could attract a magnet ;)
Do you think there would be any benefit to boiling down the water, say taking a five-gallon pot all the way down to one gallon, and then adding water back to the original volume? This would concentrate the mineral content a bit, but would it be enough a difference to be worth the effort?

Jmattioli
08-03-2004, 06:23 AM
I would not recommend it since it will not only be a lot of trouble but the quantity will be unpredictable unless it is scientifically measured. It is much easier IF one is having a problem with a lack of nutrients in the water to Add some nutrients such as fermax or fermaid which is measureable and provides the essential nutrients required for complete fermentation without a lot of fuss. Just remember, too much of a good thing can spoil the mead. Use nutrients with discretion if at all.
Joe

Oskaar
08-05-2004, 01:58 PM
Another factor to consider is the taste of the water after you've boiled it, especially if you're using a steel pot. Ever drank boiled water on a regular basis? Also, the minerals tend to adhere to the sides of the container as you boil the water down. I've never been a big fan of boiled water, except when I'm doing it to purify it because I don't trust the water supply where I happen to be at the time.

I don't know where you are located geographically, but you need to be cognizant of the nitrate levels in your water supply if you are in a rural area. Nitrate does not evaporate the way chlorine does, boiling, freezing, or letting water stand does not reduce the nitrate level. In fact, boiling water for more than 10 minutes can make the nitrate more concentrated. Boiling water in an aluminum pan may also convert nitrate to nitrite.

Cheers,

Oskaar

WikdWaze
08-05-2004, 03:46 PM
Is there any way for the average Joe to determine the mineral content of his water? I saw on another site that people were using those Brita filters with good results, but I don't want to take out anything the yeast might enjoy.

Yes, I have drank boiled water. It ranks right up there with gym socks as a favorite snack. That was a joke, BTW.

Jmattioli
08-05-2004, 08:20 PM
Is there any way for the average Joe to determine the mineral content of his water? I saw on another site that people were using those Brita filters with good results, but I don't want to take out anything the yeast might enjoy. (snip)

Yes, your water supplier will provide you with that information upon request. They are required to both test and report findings.
Joe

SteveT
08-07-2004, 04:54 AM
Hey Steve,

I was reading your post and got confused (which is not a very rare state of mind for me)

You wrote:


Were you saying that the mead is absolutely incredible after seven years of aging? I don't have any on hand that's lasted that long. But, since you have a couple bottles left . . . . ;D

I hope they get even better as they age!



You are right for being confused, the 7 year old sweet mead is absolutely awesome. I placed in the the basement after our last move and kind of forgot about it. Maybe I was drinking mead that night --sorry!

Oskaar
08-07-2004, 09:50 AM
No need to be sorry. Just drink mead, it's what's for dinner! LOL

Oskaar