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Helios
09-09-2004, 07:51 AM
I have seen in a few posts the use of Grape Tannin.

What exactly that particular additive do?

Jmattioli
09-09-2004, 08:42 AM
I have seen in a few posts the use of Grape Tannin.

What exactly that particular additive do?
It adds astringency or zest to the mead. It also aids in clearing the mead quickly.
Basically, many use strong tea for the same purpose. Astringency causes the mouth to draw up or pucker and leaves a drying effect. It adds a nice effect to mead and is naturally present in red wine as it comes from the grape skins.
Joe

Helios
09-09-2004, 08:48 AM
I have only been a member of this forum for a few days...from what I have posted and have read of other topics.... I have come to the conclusion that your knowledge and experience is a great asset ..Thank you......

Oskaar
09-09-2004, 10:33 AM
To get an idea of the effect of tannins in your mouth you can look to red wine.

You feel the effect of tannins when you drink a red wine and feel that dryness between your teeth and gums, and a bit of warmness on the front of your tongue and cheeks.

On young and overly astringent wines you'll get a hot feeling on the front of your tongue and mouth, and washes across your mouth as you swallow.

Generally the amount of tannins that you add to your mead doesn't approach this level, but you do need to be judicious when you add tannic acid (grape tannins) in order to maintain your balance.

Sorry for using red wine as the practical example but I'm getting ready to make up a 20 gallon batch of wine this weekend so I need the practice! ;D

Cheers,

Oskaar

ScottS
09-09-2004, 06:58 PM
Another note on tannins:

Many people, including myself, believe that you should never add tannins at the beginning of the mead making process. It is very easy to get too much, and too much can take many years to age out. My opinion is that it is better to make your mead, age it for awhile, and then add tannins to taste. Harder to screw up, I think.

I feel the same way about acid additions, I don't trust any recipe that has acid or tannins added up front.

Jmattioli
09-10-2004, 02:05 AM
If you add 1/2t per gallon at the start you will not experience the problems that ScottS spoke of. 1/2t will not be excessive. Any more than that and I canot say for sure but would be inclinced to believe as ScottS that too much will definitly require aging. Also by adding it at the start, I have had to use a clarifier only once out of 27 batches.
Joe

Scott
11-26-2004, 07:22 AM
Hello everyone,
I'm about to start a recipe that calls for grape tannin.
I don't have any grape tannin, but I do have raisins. Can I use the raisins in place of the tannin? And if so, how much raisin per gallon should I use?

Thanks,
Scott

Jmattioli
11-26-2004, 07:40 AM
Marvin,
25 per gallon will do fine. It also adds nutrients. Make sure they are all natural for best results.
Joe

Scott
11-26-2004, 07:18 PM
Thanks Joe

Scott

Skinner
12-01-2004, 09:52 AM
when is the best time to add tannins?

Talon
12-01-2004, 06:33 PM
There are many ideas of when to add tannins. The thing you have to understand about tannins is that they take time to age out and work their magic on the mead. I personally agree with Joe about adding them up front and in the beginning. This will allow them the extra time in the must prior to bottling while permitting you to follow your normal routine and style of mazing. Recommended at a half teaspoon per gallon would help in speeding the clarification process, etc.

Talon.

Skinner
12-02-2004, 05:52 AM
Thanks a bunch