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View Full Version : bird flu whadd'ya think



theshadowhammer
03-19-2006, 01:23 AM
this is a great site with my intellegent people

what do you think
are you going to prep for this incase it becomes real and if so what are you going to buy?

WRATHWILDE
03-19-2006, 01:54 AM
Answer - More car wash tokens. ;D

Wrathwilde

Oskaar
03-19-2006, 03:44 AM
I'd say between Col Sanders and El Pollo Loco I'm not too worried.

Cheers,

Oskaar

David Baldwin
03-19-2006, 08:54 AM
Well if it comes down to it, we will simply eat more organically grown beef and drink more red wines. What I think I would miss most would be eggs. I'm a great fan of eggs for breakfast.


David

theshadowhammer
03-19-2006, 09:19 AM
does any one know how you catch bird flu ?
if its a virus do you get it from eating chicken or does cooking it kill the virus? maybe you get it from washing your chicken before you eat it

ken_schramm
03-19-2006, 09:50 AM
does any one know how you catch bird flu ?
if its a virus do you get it from eating chicken or does cooking it kill the virus? maybe you get it from washing your chicken before you eat it


Right now it is by handling or eating undercooked infected birds (at least it's not a prion!), but it is the possibility that human to human transmission will become commonplace that is the most frightening. There is one case of a family in which that is suspected by not confirmed. There has been one case of bird to cat transmission.

Frankly, I'm scared as hell of this. Look up our last flu pandemic (1918). Stanford has a pretty good take :

http://virus.stanford.edu/uda/

Recent genetic analysis of exhumed victims has shown that the 1918 strain was a bird flu that made the jump. We lost 675,000 Americans. That's a lot now, but consider it in light of the population size back then. And we weren't the hardest hit. With this new strain of bird flu, fatality rates are about 70%, and it kills you FAST.

Pandemics are real, and they will happen again. This virus may burn itself out, but if it makes the jump to human to human transmission, we will all pay a dear price.

KDS

theshadowhammer
03-19-2006, 02:00 PM
so again if anyone is preparing for this whats on oyur shopping list?

byathread
03-19-2006, 05:11 PM
Buy direct from the producer!!

I'm a huge proponent of supporting your neighbors and preventing pollution associated with long-distance transportation. After all, the average fruit or vege in the supermarket travels 1500 miles from growth to consumption...sure is an awful waste.

I buy most of my produce at a local farmer's market. I also buy my dairy, eggs, poultry, beef/lamb/goat from ranchers within a couple hundred miles. I am friends with these producers (mostly organic) and am familiar with their methods of production. Though you have to pay for higher quality it really comes through in the flavor and nutrition of the product. It's also satisfying to know you're supporting the local economy, keeping family farmers in business, preventing pollution, and getting the safest, purest, hormone/pesticide-free meat and produce available.

Educate yourself on agriculture and animal-husbandry and seek out responsible producers (preferably local). Also, check out the following links:

Farmer's Markets - http://www.ams.usda.gov/farmersmarkets/map.htm

Pasture-raised meats and dairy - http://www.eatwild.com/

Brewbear
03-26-2006, 06:47 AM
That sounds like a wonderful thing but not so easely accomplished in SoCal.
As for the bird flu, It scares the hell out of me!!!

Cheers,
Brewbear

kash
03-27-2006, 11:30 AM
I'm not really the doomsday sorta guy, but I do think the common idea is that the longer before the next pandemic (or between pandemecis) the worse it will be. I'm not so sure if this is true. It might have a instinctual gut logic, but looking at highly infectious things like ebola or dengue, they don't run rampant even if given the opportunity that our highly connected society offers.

Compairing the 1919 outbreak to what might happen today I think is just a little hyperbolic. While we probably won't have a vaccine for the correct strain of avian flu available for the public that is hardly the only recourse that medicine offers. Huge leaps in public awareness and sanitation have happened in the last hundred years. Additionally there are many other medical recourses that will/can reduce the number of infected and fatalities.

To expect a repeat of what happened a hundred years ago given the advancements to medicine and public understanding now just isn't realistic. The fact that people are discussing it before the fact, proves atleast half my point.

theshadowhammer
03-27-2006, 12:18 PM
i went shopping this week end
call me paranoid but i feels good to be prepared
natural disaster list
can food
manual can opener
batteries
gatorade
v-8
first aid kit
rubber glowes
5 gallon tank of gas
toliet paper
power bars
tooth paste
deodorant
dark beer
water
ammo
medical supplies(immodium, advil, tylenol, claritin D, herdal immune system drops)

i actually feel sillier now writing this list than i did buying the stuff
i guess theres no harm in being prepared i dont think the bird flu will be the big one so to speak but there could always be an earthquake or some thing else
and i feel better knowing im triing to protect my family

WRATHWILDE
03-27-2006, 12:41 PM
i went shopping this week end
call me paranoid but i feels good to be prepared
natural disaster list

rubber glowes

and i feel better knowing im triing to protect my family


Glow in the dark condoms? ;)

Wrathwilde

yabodie
03-27-2006, 12:42 PM
Just incase you want to learn more about the bird flu, etc please checkout the CDC website about this virus... http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/index.htm

"Most cases of avian influenza infection in humans are thought to have resulted from direct contact with infected poultry or contaminated surfaces. So far, the spread of H5N1 virus from person to person has been limited and has not continued beyond one person."

So unless you are working at a poultry farm, I would not worry about it at the moment. Be more concerned about road rage or a bottle bomb in your cellar.

Once it starts transmitting from person to person then do what mom always said.. wash your hands with soap and water.

Just my 2˘s...

yabodie
03-27-2006, 12:49 PM
Also from the World Health Origanization...
Source: http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/avian_faqs/en/index.html#isthere

How do people become infected?

Direct contact with infected poultry, or surfaces and objects contaminated by their faeces, is presently considered the main route of human infection. To date, most human cases have occurred in rural or periurban areas where many households keep small poultry flocks, which often roam freely, sometimes entering homes or sharing outdoor areas where children play. As infected birds shed large quantities of virus in their faeces, opportunities for exposure to infected droppings or to environments contaminated by the virus are abundant under such conditions. Moreover, because many households in Asia depend on poultry for income and food, many families sell or slaughter and consume birds when signs of illness appear in a flock, and this practice has proved difficult to change. Exposure is considered most likely during slaughter, defeathering, butchering, and preparation of poultry for cooking.

Is it safe to eat poultry and poultry products?

Yes, though certain precautions should be followed in countries currently experiencing outbreaks. In areas free of the disease, poultry and poultry products can be prepared and consumed as usual (following good hygienic practices and proper cooking), with no fear of acquiring infection with the H5N1 virus.

In areas experiencing outbreaks, poultry and poultry products can also be safely consumed provided these items are properly cooked and properly handled during food preparation. The H5N1 virus is sensitive to heat. Normal temperatures used for cooking (70oC in all parts of the food) will kill the virus. Consumers need to be sure that all parts of the poultry are fully cooked (no “pink” parts) and that eggs, too, are properly cooked (no “runny” yolks).

memento
03-27-2006, 01:10 PM
I'm not going to prep for anything that isn't a danger. Right now, it is not a danger (at least to us that are not working on a poultry farm). The problem will be if/when it becomes human-to-human. Then I'll watch the news to see how things develop. Due to my job, I'm likely to be one of the first to receive any shots for protection.

If there is a pandemic, one of the best things you can do is wash your hands frequently with soap. Antibacterial is useless because this is not a bacteria.

sickpuppy
03-27-2006, 01:51 PM
Bird flu is scary in that I don’t think anyone really knows how it is transmitted. The only good thing is that so far it does not seem to be human to human transmission. But, I wonder, as in the Nile Virus, which is transmitted from birds by mosquitoes if this can not be just as bad as human to human transmission in areas like I live in with an abundance of mosquitoes.

We can only hope that they come up with a bird flu shot, but like regular flu shots they usually do not cover every variety that is out there and the strains keep mutating.

I, guess, the only thing to do, is to drink more mead and wine. Keep the old blood alcohol level up and hope that affords some protection. LOL

Dan

Dan McFeeley
03-27-2006, 01:52 PM
i went shopping this week end
call me paranoid but i feels good to be prepared
natural disaster list

rubber glowes

and i feel better knowing im triing to protect my family


Glow in the dark condoms? ;)

Wrathwilde


That's not preparation -- that's recreation! ;D ;D ;D

Dan McFeeley
03-27-2006, 02:23 PM
More seriously -- I liked Ken Schramm's post on this thread, good info with a solid data base. Yabodie's posts were *very* informative. Good stuff! Thanks!

We've forgotten what it was like before the era of effective antibiotics. Pandemics were an apocalyptic fear that always loomed on the horizon. You never knew.

The problem with antibiotics is that eventually microorganisms will develop resistance to them. Doctors are starting to back off from too judicious a use of antibiotics for this reason. Want to strike fear in the heart of a hospital nursing supervisor? Just say the word MRSA. ;D

Washing hands regularly is a good deal, but this is a hospital procedure. Applying it to cooking is another thing. Best advice here is, use soap, keep things washed and sanitized following standard precautions but remember that running water can sometimes be more effective than soap. Seriously! Soap is a good thing, but keep that water running. That's what makes the difference.

Bird flu -- maybe the best thing is to treat poultry in the same way we treat pork. Remember the problems with trichinosis? http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article.php?id=20

Cook it well, don't serve semi raw stuff. Buy from reputed dealers or raise your own. Wash *everything*, lots of running water.