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Thread: Bad new on the 2009 honey crop

  1. #1
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    Unhappy Bad new on the 2009 honey crop

    I saw this report on the 2009 honey crop in the U.S. - not good. It cannot do anything to help the price of honey.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  2. #2
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    Bummer, that.

  3. #3
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    That's pretty depressing. I'm now glad that I stocked up for the year's planned meadmaking when I did. But perhaps this will spur more hobbyist/entrepreneurs to set up local hives - that could help in the long run.
    Na zdrowie!

    Wayne B.

  4. #4

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    I appreciate your optimism Wayne, but I don't see this is as good news at all. High(er) honey prices will surely deter people from jumping into the meadmaking hobby - and possibly business.

  5. Unhappy

    Oh Geez, thanks for this report Medsen! I get most of my honey from a local healthfood/organics store...any suggestions on another retailer that might have a larger supply so that we can start stocking up?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prolific_Praxis View Post
    Oh Geez, thanks for this report Medsen! I get most of my honey from a local healthfood/organics store...any suggestions on another retailer that might have a larger supply so that we can start stocking up?
    Where are you? Also, are there any local beekeepers in your area?
    Na zdrowie!

    Wayne B.

  7. #7

    Default Ughhh....

    That sucks...

  8. #8

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    I agree with Wayneb that increasing honey prices, (if they actually go up), as a direct result of smaller supply, will attract more beekeepers/honey producers. After all, we live in a capitalistic country (a GOOD thing IMHO), because financial gain will manifest itself in the supply of honey.

    Those of us fortunate enough to live in high honey producing states, are somewhat "insulated" from this past years cold summer (global warming bunk? -- read "Liberty & Tyranny" by Mark Levin for an interesting viewpoint), and continue with mead making as usual. In fact, I suggest honey buyers patronize those states and honey producers that have done well this year despite the weather to help ensure their liquidity. For the past two years I've purchased high quality OB honey (I do live in Flordia!) for $25/gallon, but I can go and pick it up. Compared to honey prices around the rest of the country, this is a fantastic bargain! My first two batches were clover and wildflower honey from the Northwest, and they cost me >$50/gal with shipping!

    So, I heartily agree with Ken Schramm, patronize your local beekeepers/honey producers!!! The way to maintain lower costs over the long haul is to ensure we have enough producers to maintain competition.

    Eric
    Magnificent, Enchanting, Alcohol Delight - MEAD!

  9. #9
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    Yeah, I'd consider putting in a hive or two if I had the room, which I don't. There's nothing like making something prohibitively expensive to get folks to do for themselves, which helps everyone in the long run.

    And yeah on Levin's book.

  10. #10

    Default

    I'd allow a hive or two here, even though my dad is allergic >.> but with the 6 fruit trees in the yard, could only help them.

    Anyone know the best way to find local suppliers for honey >.>

  11. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wayneb View Post
    Where are you? Also, are there any local beekeepers in your area?
    Well, I live in Iowa so theoretically, yes there are some (I usually buy from one apiary) but I want to get a bunch of varieties. A lot of clover and alfalfa honeys around here.

  12. #12

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    Ouch! This is going to sting. (sorry, couldn't avoid the pun)

    Prices have already gone up significantly since we started the meadery. This year's going to be tough. On one hand, people will buy less mead if I raise my prices. But on the other, we'll be cutting into our already small profits if we don't raise prices.

    What's a meadmaker to do?
    Brad Dahlhofer
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fisher kel Tath View Post
    Anyone know the best way to find local suppliers for honey
    I would suggest trying the National Honey Board, I have used this site to find honey both locally and in other states. Not an exhaustive list, but it may help. I was able to find a supplier that sells 5 gallon buckets of wildflower honey for $95.00 even with shipping it tops out at just over $2.00/lb for quality honey.

    You might also try contacting your local Cooperative Extension, they might be able to provide a list of small suppliers in and around your county.

    Early this year I was introduced to a local beekeeper who is retired and the bees are a source of a little extra income as well as something to keep him busy. I was able to work out a deal with him to buy a couple of 10 frame hives, a few lbs of bees, and some odds and ends. He does all the work and we split the honey 50/50.
    Vino,
    The only thing slower than the hand of a clock...is a bubbling airlock!

  14. #14

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    Hello, I am a total newbie so I am probably going to ask a d umb question, but here goes. I was wondering where to find Heather Honey? I tasted a really smooth mead once and found out it was a hearther mead from scotland and it's had me dreaming of brewing mead ever since.

  15. #15
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    Hi, Butterfly! Welcome to the "Gotmead?" community!! In the future it would be better to start a different thread with your question, because it does somewhat re-direct the thread, and with the original title of this thread you might not get a quick reply to your specific question. However, this time I will make an exception because I can help you out!

    There are several suppliers of specialty monofloral honeys, including heather, in North America. One that I like to do business with and that I recommend are the Bee Folks: http://www.beefolks.com/shopdisplayp...remium+Heather

    One word of caution - well, two words. First, heather honey is extremely expensive and the supply here in North America fluctuates, so if you're willing to invest the $$ in it, you may have to get on a waiting list for larger quantities. Second, heather meads aren't always pleasing to all palates. A dry heather mead can be pretty harsh, and it isn't always to everyone's taste. As a new meadmaker I recommend that you use a more commonly available honey for your first few batches. Then when you have the techniques down, and you're pretty confident in the process, you can give some heather honey a try without risking losing a lot of $$ in the event that something gets messed up during the fermentation or aging.

    Good luck with your meadmaking!!
    Na zdrowie!

    Wayne B.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Dahlhofer View Post
    Ouch! This is going to sting. (sorry, couldn't avoid the pun)

    Prices have already gone up significantly since we started the meadery. This year's going to be tough. On one hand, people will buy less mead if I raise my prices. But on the other, we'll be cutting into our already small profits if we don't raise prices.

    What's a meadmaker to do?
    How about raise your own bees? And have your own supply of Honey? Then just buy the specialty honeys that you can't make?

    Just an idea....

  17. #17

    Default

    You could look up your local Bee club.
    There might be a few people there willing to sell some honey.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by storm1969 View Post
    How about raise your own bees? And have your own supply of Honey? Then just buy the specialty honeys that you can't make?

    Just an idea....
    I've been asked this question before. And in fact, B. Nektar has been criticized in the past by a small few that think we're less of a meadery because we don't keep our own bees. I find its best to stick with what you know. I prefer to pay the beekeeper because he's the professional. My goal is to be the best meadmaker I can be, so worrying myself with the details of raising bees and harvesting honey takes me away from what I do best. Making damn good mead (and selling it too)
    Brad Dahlhofer
    Co-Founder / CEO
    B. Nektar Meadery - www.bnektar.com
    Sign up for our newsletter (on our website) for news about upcoming releases.
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    Vice-President - American Mead Makers Association -www.mead-makers.org

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Dahlhofer View Post
    I've been asked this question before. And in fact, B. Nektar has been criticized in the past by a small few that think we're less of a meadery because we don't keep our own bees. I find its best to stick with what you know. I prefer to pay the beekeeper because he's the professional. My goal is to be the best meadmaker I can be, so worrying myself with the details of raising bees and harvesting honey takes me away from what I do best. Making damn good mead (and selling it too)
    It's hard enough work to fire up a new business, and then add on the work of maintaining what would be a very large apiary. There are the ongoing struggles with the varroa mite, and now there's colony collapse disorder. Serious problems in the apiary could wipe out mead production.

    As a whole, meaderies with their own apiary are the exception. It is a nice touch, but in a way it's also limiting for meadmakers who may want to produce meads based on specific varietal blends not available due to the local flora.

    Another tip on the question posed in this thread on where to find local honey, try a farmer's market. You'll not only find local sources of honey, you'll get to meet and talk with the beekeeper.

    .
    <><><><><><><><><><>
    <><><><><><><><>
    Dan McFeeley

    "Meon an phobail a thogail trid an chultur"
    (The people's spirit is raised through culture)

  20. #20

    Default One Idea nobody hit on

    If your looking for bee keepers to buy honey from.

    Well First if you live in Central Pa Give me a hollar. I can probably hook you up with some one.

    Second. and no one has mentioned this I don't think. If you live in, or can easily access rural areas. Just drive around and keep your eyes open for bee hives. I will admit they are not the easiest things to spot. considering most people try to give them some cover from harsh weather. But I know in my area they can been seen from the road in place's. If you happen to see any hives just stop into the farmers, if they are not his he will at least know who they belong to.

    Third. another idea is. Stop at a fruit farm of some kind. More than likely they have some one come in to pollinate. They can give you that name and number. who in turn if you are looking for something more specific can give you the name of some one else.

    Probably the easiest idea has already been said. call the local Ag extension office.

    Oh, here is another idea. do a search for bee supplies companies. they probably have an idea who there customers are. (let me rephrase that, they DO know who there bigger customers are.) My suggestion there is someplace like Dadant and Mannlake.

    Good luck.
    Sabar

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