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Thread: Watery mead

  1. #1
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    Default Watery mead

    I've just racked my first batch of mead. I tasted some, and got a hint of lemon, and a honey aftertaste.
    But it was watery and tasting like diluted wine...

    What have I done wrong? And what can be done to fix it?

  2. #2
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    Please provide the full details of your recipe and process and folks may be able to help.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  3. #3
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    Yup, can't tell you what you did wrong until we know what you did! Some meads just taste bad at the beginning too, doesn't necessarily mean much.

  4. #4
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    Sorry,
    This was in a different thread, I forgot to repost.

    Quote Originally Posted by kudapucat View Post
    OK Things are suddenly happening.

    Batch No 1011210 has drastically slowed bubbling.
    I took a sample and tested the gravity. So here's the data: *CG is current gravity at the date this was written

    Prepared: 21/11/10
    Volume: 1 gal
    Style: Dry Show Mead
    Yeast EC-1118
    Honey: CB10 - mountain honey with gum, teatree, lavender and orchard influence.
    Nutrient: 1 tsp DAP - added on day 4
    OG: 1.085
    CG: 1.000
    ABV: 12% --not too sure on this calc.


    So... does this mean it's time to rack?
    I tasted it.
    Wine like bouquet.
    Rather dry, but not offensive.
    Nasty twang of some sort - hopefully time will fix this
    Definite hint of Lemon.
    Edit: Watery

    There are some plums falling off the trees in our street, so I'd like to rack it onto some of these... any ideas or procedures that would be advised?

    Edit: The plums are very tart usually, more so than sour cherries. If this makes a difference.

  5. #5

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    How much honey (pounds) did you include in this batch

  6. #6
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    Well, that's a lower ABV mead, which means less honey per volume, but well high enough to make a good dry mead. My guess is simply that this is too young to judge. Many light dry traditionals taste watery at first, even up to and past a year, but at some point the honey flavour and aroma come back in a big way that is very surprising.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
    How much honey (pounds) did you include in this batch
    Enough to get an SG of 1085 as per Ken Shramm's recipe for dry show mead.
    I dont know.
    I added 3kg to 2 batches such that one was 1085 and the other 1115
    Sorry, that's all the info I have.
    The 1115 is still fermenting strong. I fear the EC-1118 will make that just as dry, only much higher alcohol.
    The CG yesterday when i racked was actually 0995 or less.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kudapucat View Post
    Enough to get an SG of 1085 as per Ken Shramm's recipe for dry show mead.
    I dont know.
    I added 3kg to 2 batches such that one was 1085 and the other 1115
    Sorry, that's all the info I have.
    The 1115 is still fermenting strong. I fear the EC-1118 will make that just as dry, only much higher alcohol.
    The CG yesterday when i racked was actually 0995 or less.
    Yup, that one's likely to go dry as well, don't fear though - while that higher ABV might make it require longer aging, it also means more honey flavour and aroma (though this only works up to a point, eventually high ABV starts covering up flavours, so you can end up with the opposite effect).

    Don't worry about the quality of the mead yet. I know it's hard not to just a mead by its early impressions (which is why most of the time I've stopped even taking taste tests until after months of aging, other than in situations where I want to observe and learn from the changes), but give them some age and I'm confident you'll be surprised.

    As you mentioned in the other thread too, if you don't want traditionals these will make great bases for melomels. If you like a little sweetness, try adding sulphites and sorbate prior to adding the fruit - that way the fruit won't ferment and you'll get a little sugar.

  9. #9
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    Default Correction

    They were 2 x 1 gal batches with 3kg or somewhere near 6lb of honey between them.
    The second I think was 1150 not 1115, but I'll check when I get home.

    Re melomels

    I'm keeping one as a show and one racking as a melomel. Of all my batches. This is for comparison reasons. So I can work out what I want.

    I discovered ripe boysenberries so picked them all, finding I had 200g / 1 litre. I thought this a good medium flavour when using ken schramm's guide for raspberry quantities.
    The colour change was amazingly quick.
    Fermentation continued (well bubbling did) but at a slower rate to the non melomel racking.
    The show mead is still bubbling this morning, but the melomel appears to have inverted the process, and drew the water in the lock so as to suggest negative pressure. It's not much(8mm H2O) but certainly not positive pressure.
    Is this normal or something to worry about.
    All the fruit began floating too.


    I washed the fruit to remove leaves, spider webs etc, then rinsed in metabisulphate (or whatever it is)

    Thoughts?

  10. #10
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    In your dry batch, aging may help it a lot. The body usually becomes fuller with time. Adding some tannin may also give a dry mead a bit more mouthfeel and body, and of course, sweeting it will increase body as well.

    I'd let it clear and taste in about 6 months to decide if it needs some tweaking.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

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