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Thread: Aging in "bag in box"

  1. #1

    Default Aging in "bag in box"

    Is this any good? I was thinking about this for my test batches in order to just taste half a glass a month or so to see how they progress...

    Cheers!
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiwas View Post
    Is this any good? I was thinking about this for my test batches in order to just taste half a glass a month or so to see how they progress...

    Cheers!
    That's a very interesting concept
    Sure seems to be an easy way to store and test as time goes on without having to much oxygen come in contact with the mead every time you open and close the container. Look forward to seeing how everyone feels about your idea.

    TB

  3. #3

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    Me, too With my smaller batches, I was planning on doing the clearing in "small" PET bottles, then transfer it. Part of the plan is to learn how taste changes as mead ages...without getting too much oxygen into it.

    I pay ~US$7 for a bag-in-a-box, while a glass wine bottle is ~US$2+cork++
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  4. #4

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    Found this link which seems interesting. They kept opened wine for 6 weeks without any obvious signs of oxidation. With wine being more susceptible to oxidation, this could be promising...
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  5. #5
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    I don't know the answer, but if you try it out, I hope you post up a good comparison of the results. For a mead, it just might be a very workable solution.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  6. #6

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    I'll do my best, but this trial really is more about learning to taste than anything. I can, however, report on obvious off flavors and color change...

    The plan so far is
    1. Primary on opaque bucket
    2. Secondary on a clear plastic bottle - just until it clears
    3. Age on BiB and taste continually until they're empty
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiwas View Post
    2. Secondary on a clear plastic bottle - just until it clears
    This can be a really long time if you're not using fining agents. I used to think my meads were clearing after 1 month, or 3 months, but then I realized they clear in phases (mine do anyways) and they're generally not actually clear until 7-9 months at the earliest, and often more than a year (for a traditional, fruit meads clear faster for me).
    ~AToE (A Thing of Eternity... it's a nerd thing...)

    AKA: Alan H

  8. #8

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    Hmmm...How about if I just let it get rid of the worst and then rack it into the BiB? I should be able to sample it without disturbing the sediment, and then rerack into a clean BiB aftre a year's time or so...?...
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  9. #9
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    Sure, if you want. Good old carboy aging seems a lot easier to work with to me, but we each make do with what we have!
    ~AToE (A Thing of Eternity... it's a nerd thing...)

    AKA: Alan H

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by AToE View Post
    Sure, if you want. Good old carboy aging seems a lot easier to work with to me, but we each make do with what we have!
    Well, it's only to allow me to taste it pretty often. I need to taste what aging does
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiwas View Post
    Me, too With my smaller batches, I was planning on doing the clearing in "small" PET bottles, then transfer it. Part of the plan is to learn how taste changes as mead ages...without getting too much oxygen into it.

    I pay ~US$7 for a bag-in-a-box, while a glass wine bottle is ~US$2+cork++
    I'm interested in your original idea. You could bottle in 2 liter, soda botttles and when you sample you can squeez the bottle so that there is no air in it. Even better, build a DIY carbonator and top off with some CO2.

  12. #12

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    You could do the same with a glass bottle, and add a few marbles each time you take out a small sample.
    Living and Working in Brownsburg, IN
    www.IndyBlueprints.com
    (My work gig to support my Wine Habbit)

  13. #13

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    Here's something I don't understand, although my Dad does this to take wine to Florida that he's made...
    How do you get the mead/wine in the bag? Does the spigot come out, or do you hold the spigot open?
    Seem unwieldy to me.

  14. #14

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    the draining part (is that a spigot?) comes off, so you just pour into the hole and then reattach it.
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiwas View Post
    the draining part (is that a spigot?) comes off, so you just pour into the hole and then reattach it.
    Yes that's it. Thanks.
    I've haven't looked closely enough I guess.
    I know my father reuses the wine concentrate bags as well. They have a snap cap type thing that you remove with a bottle openerer and can snap back on.

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