View Poll Results: What products would you like to see more of from commercial meaderies?

Voters
28. You may not vote on this poll
  • Dry styles of mead

    11 39.29%
  • Semi-sweet styles of mead

    11 39.29%
  • Dessert styles of mead

    4 14.29%
  • Aged/Vintage styles of mead

    14 50.00%
  • Melomels

    10 35.71%
  • Metheglins

    7 25.00%
  • Cysers/Pyments

    7 25.00%
  • Other

    0 0%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: Poll: What would you most like to see from commercial meaderies?

  1. #1
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    Question Poll: What would you most like to see from commercial meaderies?

    I'm interested in what others in our community want to see from the commercial operations. This is mainly for my own edification, but I hope others will find it interesting as well.

    If you pick other, I'd be curious to know what you'd like to see meaderies producing, and if applicable why.
    Find what you like, and hone it to perfection.

    And don't serve dodgy mead!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by YogiBearMead726 View Post
    I'm interested in what others in our community want to see from the commercial operations. This is mainly for my own edification, but I hope others will find it interesting as well.

    If you pick other, I'd be curious to know what you'd like to see meaderies producing, and if applicable why.

    Wow I am excited to see and try anything especially anything new. Anytime I swing by the old liquor store and they have a new mead I make a point to pick them up and try them.

  3. #3

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    So looking at the poll results....

    Is it me, or do dry meads take forever to come together? I would think meaderies cant afford to hold a dry batch in inventory long enough to release it when it tastes good.

    Ive had a number of commercial dry meads that I have no idea how old they were at the time of purchase (TTB wont let you label vintage) and i didnt care for any of them (even though the meadery got good reviews). Either I dont like dry mead (I do like dry bold red wine), or I dont even begin to like them til they are at least 1.5 yrs old (my own as an example) and they are more integrated and the honey comes back. That said, wine people (think they) want dry mead, but a dry mead doesnt have the same body a dry wine has.

    Have I just had bad examples of commercial dry mead?
    ~~ Per Apis Ad Astra ~~

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mars Colonist View Post
    So looking at the poll results....

    Is it me, or do dry meads take forever to come together? I would think meaderies cant afford to hold a dry batch in inventory long enough to release it when it tastes good.

    Ive had a number of commercial dry meads that I have no idea how old they were at the time of purchase (TTB wont let you label vintage) and i didnt care for any of them (even though the meadery got good reviews). Either I dont like dry mead (I do like dry bold red wine), or I dont even begin to like them til they are at least 1.5 yrs old (my own as an example) and they are more integrated and the honey comes back. That said, wine people (think they) want dry mead, but a dry mead doesnt have the same body a dry wine has.

    Have I just had bad examples of commercial dry mead?
    I think you have a good point. The main issue with dry meads is the aging required, and thus tied up capital before the mead is ready. I just wish some meaderies were willing to make the investment in barrel aging programs. And I'm with you...I've yet to have a good example of dry mead.

    Also, didn't know about the TTB regulation on vintages. I wonder why that might be? If all the honey used was collected during one year, one would think labeling the resulting mead with a vintage would be allowed. Especially since the same hives in the same area will produce slightly different honey year to year based on the local conditions (similar to what might be expected of the same vineyard year to year).
    Find what you like, and hone it to perfection.

    And don't serve dodgy mead!

  5. #5
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    Jun 2012
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    Question

    In the old beer brewing days they used to sell stock/strong ales right after they cleared and expected you to age them for a few months. Maybe a meadery could age a dry mead for 1 year (or 6 months) and recommend additional aging to cut the cost of storage? I would be willing to age it if it is a good mead; just like you would buy a good Bordeaux and not dream of opening it for a while. I think instant gratification is the big problem here.
    How can the prevent you from putting a vintage on it? Can't you just put "Spring 2010" on the label and then register a new label next season/year?

  6. #6
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    There is no paucity of sweet and semi-sweet mead available commercially. I think it's what "the populace" expects from a commercial mead, so that's what we get.

    I'd like to see more dry meads.
    Making Mead With TLC since 2010

  7. #7
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    May 2008
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    I'm one of the people that voted dry. Really, I prefer more of an off dry/not quite semi-sweet. It's a thin line. The last couple meads I've sampled were good, but much too sweet for me.

    And I would have voted for Other: Braggots, but I'm aware of the limitations on what a meadery can produce.

  8. #8
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    I would be nice if more labels had more info like dates and style or sweetness level.

    I like the fact that I can look at the bottle of redstone I have in the basement and see that a date of 2006 and get an idea of how old it is
    Bees stole my signature file!

  9. #9

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    A bottling date would be really nice. Even bad wines have bottling dates. Even Echo Falls has bottling dates. But no mead ever seems to have that information, despite it being more important for mead than it is for wines. In fact the only thing I can think of where the bottling date is more important than mead is Whiskey, where knowing when it was bottled is pretty much all you need to know to know what you're getting.


    I checked semi-sweet meads because I'm pretty sure I've never had a really dry mead, but I have had the Traditional and the West Country meads from Lyme Bay, and I much prefer the much drier Traditional over the sweeter West Country.

  10. #10
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    Question

    This is all great feedback! I think it is a bit too late to edit the poll, but I thought of two other, perhaps missed, styles of mead; session/low ABV meads and sparkling mead.

    Any thoughts on those two?
    Find what you like, and hone it to perfection.

    And don't serve dodgy mead!

  11. #11

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    The problem with sparkling is the excise taxes (US). It's something like $2.40 a gallon just for federal taxes, then you have state excise on top of that (another $1.40/gallon) Kind of cuts into the bottom line.

    Also, for session meads, to be considered "wine", min ABV is 7%; under that it is under FDA approval.

    That given, I would think a lot of people would be interested in both session and carbonated/sparkling... just are they will to pay for it
    ~~ Per Apis Ad Astra ~~

  12. #12
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    Lightbulb

    I would love to see a 6-8%abv mead with maltodextrin added for body, that is also sparkling. That would beat any pilsner on a hot summer day!

  13. #13

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    Im not certain you could use maltodextrin.

    It can be derived from any starch, but typically from corn or wheat, and Title 27, 24.200 specifically says, "Since grain, cereal, malt, or molasses are not suitable materials for the production of agricultural wine, these materials may not be received on bonded wine premises."

    Looks to be the same reason you cant do a braggot (in the US) in a bonded winery.
    ~~ Per Apis Ad Astra ~~

  14. #14
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    Chapitolization (not sure if that is spelled right?)! Adding sugar to dilute the acidity in wines is done with corn sugar is it not? I know it can be done at home with cane sugar, but if I owned a big winery I would use corn sugar because of the price.
    I think the issue is adding grains, not cereal products. I guarantee that there are cereal products in some of the additive used in the wine industry. Besides, it a dumb law anyway.

  15. #15
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    Just re-read the section you quoted. I love how "hops may be used in the production of honey wine", but heaven forbid a vermouth is wanted, or you want to add hops to a Chardonnay (not as weird as it sounds), and the gates of hell will open if you add grains to a wine/mead!

  16. #16
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    Sparking mead can be quiet nice. BNektar is making some. Even if the taxes are higher people are probably willing to pay more, like for champange/sparkingwine...
    Bees stole my signature file!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by skunkboy View Post
    Sparking mead can be quiet nice. BNektar is making some. Even if the taxes are higher people are probably willing to pay more, like for champange/sparkingwine...
    Searching through the commercial meaderies listed on the website, I found this place just north of me. Seems like they harvest/contract their own honey, and have pretty reasonable prices. I'd love to make mimosas with brut mead...

    I think a trip for a tour/tasting is in order once they are open to the public.
    Find what you like, and hone it to perfection.

    And don't serve dodgy mead!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by YogiBearMead726 View Post
    This is all great feedback! I think it is a bit too late to edit the poll, but I thought of two other, perhaps missed, styles of mead; session/low ABV meads and sparkling mead.

    Any thoughts on those two?
    Dang, I didn't think to add them but I'd have checked hydromel and sparkling if they'd been on the list.
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

  19. Default

    The only commercial meadery that I like so far is B Nektar. All others taste too much like wine or just taste funny. Or are too dry for me. I prefer semi-sweet to sweet.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by GDP View Post
    The only commercial meadery that I like so far is B Nektar. All others taste too much like wine or just taste funny. Or are too dry for me. I prefer semi-sweet to sweet.
    I noticed that a lot of 'meads' sold around are actually white wine flavoured with honey. I've heard they're nice but personally I've avoided these like the plague xD

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