Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Nordic Grog 1300 / 1500 BC

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ellabell, Georgia
    Posts
    624

    My Social Networking

    Add Riverat on Facebook

    Default Nordic Grog 1300 / 1500 BC

    Old news (no pun intended) but it does contain a list of some of the popular ingredients used by our early partners

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0115113038.htm
    You only go around once in life, but if you do it right, once is enough

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK - South Coast.
    Posts
    3,630

    Default

    Nice to see some scientific evidence of likely ingredients. Maybe it'll help put a stop to the idiots who want to drink "something like the vikings".......

    Yet insist in using ingredients that wouldn't likely have been available until the middle ages....
    here's me home brewing blog (if anyones interested....)
    and don't forget
    What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away! Tom Waits.....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Coral Springs, FL
    Posts
    662

    Default

    I was over a friends house a few years back. Proud Italian family. He made me his families famous tomato sauce and claimed it had been in his family for more than 600 years!
    His mother promptly agreed.
    I shut my mouth, it wasn't that great anyway!

    Columbus - 1492
    Cortés - 1521
    2008 (year of the dinner) - 600 = 1408!

    Maybe Leif erikson brought their family the tomatoes.

    I wonder how sweet that grog would've been? I know from some research that they would have transfered it a few times during ferment probably cutting it short, though this is from a few centuries later. Also it's pretty damn cold over there.
    I have a blog?

    I am the creature in the depths of your mind that screams "WHY?!"

  4. #4

    Default

    I would add :

    Pedro Álvares Cabral .... 1500

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Northeast Southweston, CT, USA
    Posts
    947

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob1016 View Post
    I was over a friends house a few years back. Proud Italian family. He made me his families famous tomato sauce and claimed it had been in his family for more than 600 years!
    His mother promptly agreed.
    I shut my mouth, it wasn't that great anyway!

    Columbus - 1492
    Cortés - 1521
    2008 (year of the dinner) - 600 = 1408!

    Maybe Leif erikson brought their family the tomatoes.
    Ditto. My father in law was incredulous when I pointed out that the Spanish brought tomatoes back from the new world, and that they not only weren't native to good old Italia (or as he said, It-ly), but that for the first hundred or so years after the tomato had been brought to Italy from Spain, Italians used them only as ornamental plants because they thought they were poisonous.

    Between that and the fact that spaghetti and ravioli were modifications of Chinese foods, I'm surprised he ever talked to me again... but man, I tried. <LOL>

    Joe
    Intelligence Is Knowing That A Tomato Is A Fruit
    Wisdom Is Knowing Not To Put It In A Fruit Salad

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK - South Coast.
    Posts
    3,630

    Default

    It's the same everywhere that is "western". What with "we" discovering everything etc, when it
    does seem that that should be termed that this or that was either "discovered for the western societies" or attributed to where a given individual discovered something and it was commercialised by the west, either first or just in the best way.

    If it wasn't for what seems to be "oriental xenophobia" would the origins or first discoveries of many of the scientific principles, often in China, have remained secret so long ? Only to be discovered again by the western nations who trumpeted them ?

    Dunno, but I'd guess that proper analysis of trace evidence puts an end to some of the Hollywood fantasy nonsense, whereby people try to use all the wrong elements in a batch.

    it'd be really interesting if they could get DNA from the yeast traces, so the yeast producers would likely have to change the naming on so called "mead yeasts" so new makers weren't mislead into buying them, thinking they must be the right ones to use........
    here's me home brewing blog (if anyones interested....)
    and don't forget
    What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away! Tom Waits.....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    8,309

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by joemirando View Post
    Italians used them only as ornamental plants because they thought they were poisonous.
    Tomatoes (and potatoes too) are in the nightshade family, so it's really no surprise that people thought they were poisonous.
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Harford, NY
    Posts
    291

    My Social Networking

    Follow Shelley On Twitter Add Shelley on Facebook

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverat View Post
    Old news (no pun intended) but it does contain a list of some of the popular ingredients used by our early partners

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0115113038.htm
    Dogfish Head Brewery worked with Dr. McGovern to recreate it, calling it "Kvasir." I will consider it my obligation to try it (at least once) and evaluate it.
    Mead Magic
    Turn Honey Into Wine
    With our complete one-gallon kit!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Coral Springs, FL
    Posts
    662

    Default

    A lot of this historical misconception comes from the fact that humanls like to catorgize things. Tomato sauce is "Italian", potatoes are "Irish", mead is "Nordic", mild ale is "dark", etc. it helps us to make connections to things. We forget that mild ale simply meant young and lightly hopped, and that mead usually just referred to the fact that the beverage had honey (mel, med, etc.) in it. Over time vocabulary changes, and people who think they know history forget that a word can have a very different meaning even 100 years ago. Some times the actual minutia of history is not as important as the landmarks that change the meaning of the word (or what we associate it with); tomatoes may be South American, but their importance is due to the Italians; pale ale existed since the 1600s in englend, but our modern versions are based on the 19tg century burton brewers versions of this drink (interestingly, it would have been considered a pale beer in the 1700s, but an ale in the 1800s (ale meaning no, or little hops compared to beer)).

    History is funny.
    I have a blog?

    I am the creature in the depths of your mind that screams "WHY?!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK - South Coast.
    Posts
    3,630

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley View Post
    Dogfish Head Brewery worked with Dr. McGovern to recreate it, calling it "Kvasir." I will consider it my obligation to try it (at least once) and evaluate it.
    Now see I understood that kvasir was a more eastern European/Russian origin thing. .......dunno where I got that idea from, likely something read !
    here's me home brewing blog (if anyones interested....)
    and don't forget
    What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away! Tom Waits.....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Coral Springs, FL
    Posts
    662

    Default

    Kvasir was a god in Nordic mythology. Upon his death they used his blood to wash honey comes and made a mead from it.
    I do recall something about it being a russian thing as well (maybe a type of mead?), but can't remember.
    I have a blog?

    I am the creature in the depths of your mind that screams "WHY?!"

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chevette Girl View Post
    Tomatoes (and potatoes too) are in the nightshade family, so it's really no surprise that people thought they were poisonous.
    Apparently it also had to do with Europeans use of lead/pewter pots,plates and bowls. The acidity of the tomatoes drastically elevated the amount of lead that leached into peoples food and they could die of lead poisoning but people associated it with the tomatoes because their other food didn't produce the same results.

  13. #13

    Default

    This reminds me of a old saying:

    If barley be wanting to make into malt,
    We must be content and think it no fault,
    For we can make liquor to sweeten our lips,
    Of pumpkins, and parsnips, and walnut-tree chips.

    Just like the in the time of Colonial America the Scandinavians had a good idea.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Harford, NY
    Posts
    291

    My Social Networking

    Follow Shelley On Twitter Add Shelley on Facebook

    Default

    I picked up a bottle (a whopping 2-pinter for about $13). I finished my pint, bragging rights achievement unlocked, but I'm not going to rush out to buy another bottle. There are a lot of flavors going on, least of which seems to be the honey. It's like it can't decide if it's an ale, a cider, or a beer. I think if I liked beer (at all) I might have liked this more.
    Mead Magic
    Turn Honey Into Wine
    With our complete one-gallon kit!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Northeast Southweston, CT, USA
    Posts
    947

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chevette Girl View Post
    Tomatoes (and potatoes too) are in the nightshade family, so it's really no surprise that people thought they were poisonous.
    Yeah, but once you give 'em to somebody, and the sombitch lives, wouldn't you kinda get the idea? <grin>

    And the three really don't resemble one another, so I'm left to wonder how they were classified as all being in the same family.

    Joe
    Intelligence Is Knowing That A Tomato Is A Fruit
    Wisdom Is Knowing Not To Put It In A Fruit Salad

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Bundoora, Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    2,383

    Default Nordic Grog 1300 / 1500 BC

    Eggplant too Joe.
    And they do look quite similar. Potato even fruits little poisonous tomato like fruits.
    Mae'r teithiau golau ceffyl eto

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Coral Springs, FL
    Posts
    662

    Default

    The real question is why is tobacco in the same family?!
    All night shades are poisonous to some extent. Tomato and potato leaves are poisonous, as are eggplant leaves.

    On a side note, I once grafted 3 tomato varieties onto a Japanese eggplant. It was a very interesting plant!
    I have a blog?

    I am the creature in the depths of your mind that screams "WHY?!"

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Emmeloord, Netherlands formerly Chicago area
    Posts
    2,467

    Default Then there was Kvothe......

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob1016 View Post
    Kvasir was a god in Nordic mythology. Upon his death they used his blood to wash honey comes and made a mead from it.
    I do recall something about it being a russian thing as well (maybe a type of mead?), but can't remember.
    ...who is the main character in a fellow meadmaker's (Patrick Rothfuss) books....

    http://www.amazon.com/Name-Wind-King...trick+rothfuss
    Don't Panic!

    From Portugal to Poland, on a perpetual pursuit for more honey.....

    Issues unique to the Netherlands at
    http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthr...880#post222880

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •