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Thread: Tea!

  1. #1
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    Default Tea!

    Thanks to a suggestion from Joe, I ordered some tea from India and I found this on my doorstep today!







    My TARDIS mug is happy again! That Darjeeling is the best I have ever had!


    Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now. G

  2. #2
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    Sounds neat mannye. I only know how to make tea from a bag. How do you brew your loose tea?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by danr View Post
    Sounds neat mannye. I only know how to make tea from a bag. How do you brew your loose tea?
    If you look at the last picture, you will see a white pot. I boil enough water to fill it and however much tea I will be making (usually I boil enough water to fill it one and a half times)

    When the water reaches a rolling boil, I turn off the heat and fill the pot, leaving the remaining water in the pot. (It will cool enough to be the right temp while the pot heats up) I leave the water in the pot for a minute, then pour it out. I now have a nice pre-heated teapot. I put one heaping teaspoon of loose tea in the pot and pour the now slightly cooled water over it.

    Cover with a towel to keep the pot hot (my dishtowel tea cozy) wait 4 or 5 minutes and pour into a mug through a strainer. Done.

    It sounds like a lot of hassle, but it really isn't. Takes maybe 2 more minutes than making a bag but the flavor is far superior.

  4. #4
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    Or... you can use a mesh ball like this...
    http://www.amazon.com/Progressive-St...words=tea+ball

    The wife introduced me to Lapsasng Souchon tea which has a really smokey flavor, to the point that I actually tried some in my single malt scotch. It was great !!! So, I usually do that when I have some of that yummy stuff.
    Don't Panic!

    From Portugal to Poland, on a perpetual pursuit for more honey.....

    Issues unique to the Netherlands at
    http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthr...880#post222880

  5. #5
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    Well not sure of the third one but the Assam and the Darjeeling look pretty good........
    here's me home brewing blog (if anyones interested....)
    and don't forget
    What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away! Tom Waits.....

  6. #6

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    I had never considered ordering tea directly from India (although I have had other stuff delivered from there) Thanks for posting that - I must investigate it further.

  7. #7
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    I found THIS website for San-Cha. Is this where you ordered from?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatbloke View Post
    Well not sure of the third one but the Assam and the Darjeeling look pretty good........
    Bloke,

    The 'third one', the Nilgiri, is my favorite tea of all time. It is a very pleasant black tea with an exquisite clean taste and aroma bordering on intense without being overpowering, and a distinctive trace of citrus without having any citrus in it. It is due, I am told by their tea master, to the growing conditions in the Nilgiri region.

    While Mannye prefers Darjeeling, this one is my all-time favorite. I have tried other, much more expensive teas, but none of them hold a candle to this one for me. ALL of these teas are the best of their type that I have ever tasted (take it for what it's worth from an American<G>), and my search for tea has been extensive if not exhaustive.

    Will everyone agree? Probably not. Does it matter? Not a bit. Ya finds what ya likes and ya be happy wit it. <grin>

    Oh, by the way, the Nilgiri makes a wonderful tea-based mead with lemon. Maybe I'll use some Darjeeling to see if the floral character comes out in the finished product. <grin>

    Be well,
    Joe
    Intelligence Is Knowing That A Tomato Is A Fruit
    Wisdom Is Knowing Not To Put It In A Fruit Salad

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by danr View Post
    I found THIS website for San-Cha. Is this where you ordered from?
    Yes, that's the place. Read carefully. They have minimum orders, but it won't break the bank, and they provide free shipping.

    Mannye will have to confirm, but if I remember correctly he received his order in just a little over a week. Free shipping from India in a little over a week... Hell, I have trouble receiving something from New Jersey that quickly. Maybe it got caught on the GW bridge. <chuckle>

    Joe
    disclaimer: I have no association with this company or any of its agents other than being a satisfied customer.
    Intelligence Is Knowing That A Tomato Is A Fruit
    Wisdom Is Knowing Not To Put It In A Fruit Salad

  10. #10
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    Default Tea!

    I think it was twoish weeks but for free it could have been a month, what do I care? Regardless, free shipping and 30 dollars minimum order. All that tea was only 30 bucks. Good deal. It's the equivalent of 4 tins of twinings.


    Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now. G

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mannye View Post
    I think it was twoish weeks but for free it could have been a month, what do I care? Regardless, free shipping and 30 dollars minimum order. All that tea was only 30 bucks. Good deal. It's the equivalent of 4 tins of twinings.


    Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now. G
    Ha ha! A name from the past...... the first person to explain anything about tea was a bloke called Sam Twining, and yes, funnily, he did run the company......

    orange pekoe.......yum yum !
    here's me home brewing blog (if anyones interested....)
    and don't forget
    What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away! Tom Waits.....

  12. #12
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    Wanted to try the breakfast tea this morning but I had another Darjeeling. The twins (they're 12) love it sweet with milk. I made them each a cup. Tomorrow for sure I will try both of the others.


    Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now. G

  13. #13
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    Mannye,

    Heh heh, Looks like you'd better order some more already!
    Intelligence Is Knowing That A Tomato Is A Fruit
    Wisdom Is Knowing Not To Put It In A Fruit Salad

  14. #14

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    I wonder why you call tea (T.E.A.) to something that really is called tchá in its original country (China), shay in arabic and chá in portuguese ...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by antonioh View Post
    I wonder why you call tea (T.E.A.) to something that really is called tchá in its original country (China), shay in arabic and chá in portuguese ...
    It's an anglicised bastardisation, of a different word meaning the same thing. Not sure if its from Mandarin, Cantonese or a different dialect.

    A bit like brandy, which isn't English either, its derived from the original "brandt wijn" which I understand is Dutch/Flemish for burnt wine i.e. distilled........

    Don't forget, English is more of a mongrel language than just about any other European language, with bits of Nordic, Saxon, Latin, French, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Arabic, Chinese, at least 2 types of Gaelic, a little Russian, Modern German, etc etc etc.......
    here's me home brewing blog (if anyones interested....)
    and don't forget
    What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away! Tom Waits.....

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by antonioh View Post
    I wonder why you call tea (T.E.A.) to something that really is called tchá in its original country (China), shay in arabic and chá in portuguese ...
    A rose by any other name....
    Intelligence Is Knowing That A Tomato Is A Fruit
    Wisdom Is Knowing Not To Put It In A Fruit Salad

  17. #17
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    I've heard my mum call it a cup o cha. When I asked (as a 10yo) what she meant, she said it was an old English word for tea. I dunno how true this is, but many words fall in disfavour.

    Just guessing...
    A tea is a herbal remedy that is prepared by steeping herbs in boiling water.
    As the use of cha became mainstream, making tea became synonymous with making a pot of cha.
    Mae'r teithiau golau ceffyl eto

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by antonioh View Post
    I wonder why you call tea (T.E.A.) to something that really is called tchá in its original country (China), shay in arabic and chá in portuguese ...
    I always find the origin of words interesting, so I had to go and google it:

    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=tea

    If I understand that right, the two different words - cha and tea - come from two different chinese dialects.

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