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Thread: Does it frighten anybody how little experienced distillers know about meadmaking?

  1. #1
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    Default Does it frighten anybody how little experienced distillers know about meadmaking?

    http://homedistiller.org/forum/viewt...p?f=40&t=34830

    Came across this gem today, actually all of the "tried and true" recipe threads on here make me cringe. What is it with distillers?

  2. #2
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    Doesn't surprise me one jot!

    So many of them seem to think they're "old time" distillers. Thinking that if they read a little on the net, combine that with grandpappies old shine recipe, that they'll be master distillers.

    In truth, they could easily get all the info here but seem to presume that it's just like making a corn wash or something..........
    here's me home brewing blog (if anyones interested....)
    and don't forget
    What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away! Tom Waits.....

  3. #3
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    The weird thing is their process, it seems to me that making a quality product to distill would result in a quality distillate, without all the nasty byproducts from boiling what are definitely still very active yeast and other chunks of god-knows-what.

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    Not necessarily. There are many "variations on a theme". Logic would be that you'd make whatever you're distilling, so as to be as clear and pure as possible. If you look "around the bazaars", you'll read and see pictures of many different variations of the same thing i.e. pot still or reflux still, method of heating (direct, steam, indirect, immersion element, etc etc), distilling on the sediment/mash/pulp, etc etc.

    If you then either watch "Moonshiners", or just look up about it on the net, you'll see they often use the tank/boiler for fermentation and distillation, without removing the yeast or other corn debris. This does seem counter intuitive but it entirely depends on many factors, whether you end up with a nice tasting, quality product, or one that is more horrible than hell with a nasty burnt/scorched taste etc.

    Hence don't be surprised to read, what seem like very strange methods of production, as well as a distinct lack of knowledge about what many of us mead makers do as a matter of routine. They just do some stuff differently to achieve, effectively, the same aim........

    The fact that commercially produced "honey liquor" products are quite rare and regional, is likely about the increased cost of materials and higher cost of production of those materials............ Of the few available "honey liquor" or spirit drinks that have a honey flavour, I think you'll find that most of them are like vodka that's had honey mixed in..........
    here's me home brewing blog (if anyones interested....)
    and don't forget
    What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away! Tom Waits.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by fatbloke View Post
    Doesn't surprise me one jot!

    So many of them seem to think they're "old time" distillers. Thinking that if they read a little on the net, combine that with grandpappies old shine recipe, that they'll be master distillers.

    In truth, they could easily get all the info here but seem to presume that it's just like making a corn wash or something..........
    Problem is that mead and beer makers on the whole, aren't perfect stereotypical caricatures. They are a diverse group that embraces all types and includes many people with a very high level of education.

    Moonshining, despite being MUCH more dangerous and requiring a lot more care, seems to attract those who are (this is a generalization now...so no angry letter from the one vegan literature professor that distills...I know you're out there...) seems to attract a large contingent that personifies the stereotypical character we all know. Those guys generally know everything and have nothing to learn from anyone else.

    I can tell you that it's been a chore wading through the net to find reliable advice. SO it's not just that they don't know much about mead, but that they are barely able to distill!

    That said, I have come across some very good people in that area that both know their stuff and are very pleasant but where here that's the rule, I find it's almost an exception there.

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