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Thread: who likes my mead

  1. Default who likes my mead

    To be frank, in my circle of friends and relatives, l'd say maybe one out of four. Mind you, it's not that they say it's technically bad, they just say it's not their thing. Is this the same in the US?
    I'm a mead newbie, have made maybe 4 meads in small batches, all BOMM, relatively dry, so maybe I'm not very good at it, don't know.
    Also, I live in Belgium, and we all drink lots of beer, wine, champagne, cava, etc. But you can't find mead anywhere.

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    I just starting making mead too. So far I've only tested it on my wife and me. I'm at a 50% acceptance rate so far.

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    Try a JAOM, I just brought a young one (pitched 9-15-2014, bottled 11-15-2014) to my sisters house and ~12 people have all declared it extremely tasty.
    Mazerotic Encephalopathic Affective Disorder (M.E.A.D.) - Gntlknigt1

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    Most of my family finds what I make (wines and meads) too sweet, even when I aim for dry (which I don't really care for myself). My husband, on the other hand, seems very sensitive to acidity and describes anything dry as being bitter. I don't mind it really sweet now and then but if it's really dry, one glass will last me all night and I don't particularly enjoy the experience.

    JAO's and variants always seem to disappear quickly at parties, so I guess most of my friends have similar taste to me. Try a JAO, even if people don't care for it, you're learning about their tastes (and yours).
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

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    Its all in the making, similar to beers and wines, although in Belgium, it might be all uphill as there are so many great Belgian beers. As I write this, I am having a great Brand Dubbel Bock, which is Dutch, but you get the idea. I made a speculaas mead to appeal to Dutch folks. It needs some aging so I can't say yet how it will be received, but try for some flavors that are popular there. Maybe a braggot would work.
    Don't Panic!

    From Portugal to Poland, on a perpetual pursuit for more honey.....

    Issues unique to the Netherlands at
    http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthr...880#post222880

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GntlKnigt1 View Post
    Its all in the making, similar to beers and wines, although in Belgium, it might be all uphill as there are so many great Belgian beers. As I write this, I am having a great Brand Dubbel Bock, which is Dutch, but you get the idea. I made a speculaas mead to appeal to Dutch folks. It needs some aging so I can't say yet how it will be received, but try for some flavors that are popular there. Maybe a braggot would work.
    You get me all wrong. I don't want to make mead that other people like. I want other people to like my mead. ;-)

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    So, you don't want to try a braggot? Its rather a hybrid between beer and mead. Try a search on. Braggot. And look at some of the hits. But you might be fated to making things you like that others don't appreciate
    Don't Panic!

    From Portugal to Poland, on a perpetual pursuit for more honey.....

    Issues unique to the Netherlands at
    http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthr...880#post222880

  8. Default

    I'm a homebrewer as well. In the coming months I'll make an imperial stout with about 10% heather honey. But braggots, not sure about that. When I make mead, it's because it's so simple, compared to brewing

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    I love stout !!! And you are probably only a couple hours drive from me....

    Anyway, take a look at this one from Loveofrose...
    http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthr...hlight=braggot
    or this....
    http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthr...hlight=braggot
    Don't Panic!

    From Portugal to Poland, on a perpetual pursuit for more honey.....

    Issues unique to the Netherlands at
    http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthr...880#post222880

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by homoeccentricus View Post
    You get me all wrong. I don't want to make mead that other people like. I want other people to like my mead.
    You must be persuasive. Try with a baseball club !

    If your friends like Hoegaarden (be blanche or grand cru) they will like JOAM.

    If they are more Lefe style (even brune or radieuse) maybe a bochet.

    For Stella Artois, just give them water...

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    Good luck, I can't even convince myself to like dry wines... if it's not your thing, it's not your thing. But maybe if you can get them to review things, tell you what they like and what they didn't like, it might give you more insight into their tastes and maybe learn a thing or two about your own.
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chevette Girl View Post
    Most of my family finds what I make (wines and meads) too sweet, even when I aim for dry (which I don't really care for myself). My husband, on the other hand, seems very sensitive to acidity and describes anything dry as being bitter. I don't mind it really sweet now and then but if it's really dry, one glass will last me all night and I don't particularly enjoy the experience.

    JAO's and variants always seem to disappear quickly at parties, so I guess most of my friends have similar taste to me. Try a JAO, even if people don't care for it, you're learning about their tastes (and yours).
    This is my mother, and my wife respectively.
    Mum will say it's too sweet, my wife will say the SAME glass is too bitter.

    We all have our hurdles.
    Mae'r teithiau golau ceffyl eto

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    I see mead making as an educational project: I make the mead, and the tasters are educated.

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    There ya go! Problem solved. Another satisfied patron.
    Don't Panic!

    From Portugal to Poland, on a perpetual pursuit for more honey.....

    Issues unique to the Netherlands at
    http://www.gotmead.com/forum/showthr...880#post222880

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    Educate them by making them think, not telling them stuff... "Oh, I don't like this one very much."

    "Why not? Too sweet, too dry?"

    keep asking till you get to the bottom of what they don't like.

    "Ok, taste it again and let me know, allowing for what you don't like about it, is there anything you do like and would like to experience again if the other circumstances were different?"



    Case in point... I tried a beer taster a couple years ago and there was this one that had a neat aroma with a lovely flavour and aftertaste but it was SO hops-bitter I couldn't take it more than a small sip at a time and the bitterness clung to my tongue for like 2 minutes after I swallowed, if I tried a gulp I'd do the whiskey head-shake, but if the bitterness had been dialed down, it would be something I could see myself enjoying quite a lot.
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

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    Quote Originally Posted by GntlKnigt1 View Post
    Its all in the making, similar to beers and wines, although in Belgium, it might be all uphill as there are so many great Belgian beers. As I write this, I am having a great Brand Dubbel Bock, which is Dutch, but you get the idea. I made a speculaas mead to appeal to Dutch folks. It needs some aging so I can't say yet how it will be received, but try for some flavors that are popular there. Maybe a braggot would work.
    Using that logic I should aim for a thin flavorless mead that has to be at 34F to be drinkable. That way I will appeal to all the Coors/Bud/Micheloeb drinkers.

    Actually it's not far from the truth. Seeing that the most popular wine at any party I have is Pinot Noir and Pinot Grigio. Both are served very cold and are often very thin on flavor.


    Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
    U g

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    I figure that if they don't like my mead then it's more for me! (to age that is). People are gonna be getting presents from me once I've got a few bottles put away for a year or so.
    Mazerotic Encephalopathic Affective Disorder (M.E.A.D.) - Gntlknigt1

  18. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mannye View Post
    Using that logic I should aim for a thin flavorless mead that has to be at 34F to be drinkable. That way I will appeal to all the Coors/Bud/Micheloeb drinkers.

    Actually it's not far from the truth. Seeing that the most popular wine at any party I have is Pinot Noir and Pinot Grigio. Both are served very cold and are often very thin on flavor.


    Sent from my galafreyan transdimensional communicator 100 years from now.
    U g
    I don't think this is the case in Belgium. People drink Duvel, trappists and other strong Belgian ales, decent quality wine, cava, champagne, etc. This is about mead being an acquired taste.

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    Beer is an acquired taste, as are wines and even ciders. It took me a while (20+ years) to slow down and enjoy the drink for itself and not gulp flavorless swill to to get blasted.

    Since that time I have moved away from biers and mostly go after cider, mead, and some wines.

    For my ciders I like dry, tannic and room temp or chilled slightly (50F or so).

    As for wines I'm definitely bipolar. I like chilled sweet white (dry white tastes awful to me) and room temp dry tannic red wines.

    I'm even in the process of trying to get some good oak flavor in a gallon from a 5 gallon batch of too dry (.990 FG) traditional. I'm at 14g for 60 days and it is still not enough for me. Might just leave them in bulk for a few more months.

    It all comes down to tastes and what YOU like, make that a main priority, and secondary what others might like. This is your hobby to make the best tasting beverage for yourself and friends that you can, not to make the best tasting drink that everyone likes, just impossible.

    So sit back and relax with a homebrew that you made to your liking.

    IMNSHO...
    Mazerotic Encephalopathic Affective Disorder (M.E.A.D.) - Gntlknigt1

  20. #20

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    I have found most people like my mead, though the dryer batches less so then the sweeter.

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