Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: Making Basic Mead. Honey and water.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    584

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Konamimeed View Post
    Honey is predigested sugars. Raw It has the ablity to digest starch. -
    So does human salivia.

    How much I am not sure the amounts to add. But I guess this is the best place, someone must have tired to covert starch grains with Really Raw honey.
    can you tell us where you get this information of honey itself digesting sugars?

    Keep in mind that wild yeast are unpredictable. You may end up the best mead you ever made or the worst. There is absolutely no way of knowing.
    People who create their own home yeast usually:
    1) They are already experienced mead makers that know what they are doing. And yes mead is very different than grape wine. Grapes have their own natural nutrients to feed the yeast which honey does not have. This one fact alone makes a HUGE difference. Also even with pitched yeast grape wine requires much less attention than mead. I am making my first batch of grape wine and floored by how much easier it is compared to mead.

    2) Usually these people do experiments in small batches like half gallon or quart size so if their experiment goes wrong, much less honey is lost.
    Last edited by caduseus; 01-02-2017 at 07:33 PM.

  2. #22

    Default

    A google search gives links such as the following http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI3025529/
    It seems unprocessed honey might break down starch, although I'm curious if it is effective as much as something traditionally used to break down the starch such as koji
    "Shouldn’t we say wine is a mead-like beverage made with grapes substituted for the honey?" - Steve Piatz

  3. #23

    Default

    All have good points. Go for it. What the hell. A pound and a half of honey is just pocket change. It more likely than not will suck . But, you may just get lucky. Let us know how you do.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  4. Default

    Well, one and a half days............and its just a jar of honey water.

  5. #25

    Default

    Took about 4 days for my wild t'ej to take off. With no nutrients here I'd expect maybe even longer. Sanitation is very important since it is extremely easy for a wild yeast which was not in your honey to dominate this very long lag phase. I wouldn't open the carboy if I were you because the risk of contamination is way too great
    "Shouldn’t we say wine is a mead-like beverage made with grapes substituted for the honey?" - Steve Piatz

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Northwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Konamimeed View Post
    Well, one and a half days............and its just a jar of honey water.
    Yes, it may take a while. I wouldn't be surprised if it was a week before you saw signs of fermentation.

    That said... how will you know that it's fermenting? Do you have an airlock on the jug?

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Saratoga Springs , NY
    Posts
    954

    Default

    When brewers make a starter they make sure that the starter is aerated constantly by using a stir plate. You refer to a "jar"... so are you incorporating air into this must every time you pass it by?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Northwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pdh View Post
    Really Raw Honey sells a fermented version of their raw honey, so clearly it can ferment to some extent:

    http://www.reallyrawhoney.com/category_s/44.htm

    Of course, fermented honey isn't mead. I just now sent an email to the Really Raw folks, asking whether they know of any attempts to make bona fide mead by mixing their honey with water, with no additional ingredients or starters. I'll report back when I get a reply from them.
    I got a reply from Really Raw Honey, but it's not helpful -- they say they know people have made mead using their honey, but they don't know anything about the details -- they have no idea how people went about it.

  9. Default

    I make mead both ways—with commercial yeast as well as wild fermented. If you want to play with wild fermentation, consider checking out Sandor Katz's book by that title (Wild Fermentation) in which he gives suggestions for getting fermentation going with only honey and water.

    My first attempt took about a week of stirring multiple times per day and keeping the must open to the air by covering the jar with a cloth. Then it took a good long time to ferment. I think it was in primary for three or four months, and secondary another six or so, and I am tempted to think I bottled it too soon.

    I used the lees to start another batch at racking time, and gave that about a year in secondary before bottling, and while that was probably longer than necessary, the point is that if you want excellent results, it'll take awhile. And yes, both of these batches of mead turned out nicely enough that I'll be doing that again sometime.

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Water Profile for mead making?
    By matter in forum Mead NewBees - Post your Questions Here
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 09-21-2010, 06:24 AM
  2. Heather honey/Basic Mead/Strange V high pH
    By fatbloke in forum Troubleshooting your Mead
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-12-2008, 12:34 PM
  3. Making mead with hard water
    By briankettering in forum Archives
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-09-2005, 09:01 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •