Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Places to buy 4 pounds of honey

  1. Default Places to buy 4 pounds of honey

    I'm looking at a new recipe and it calls for 4 pounds of honey. I'm having a hard time finding places to buy 4 pounds. Many places sell 3, some sell 5. Some places sell 3 and 1, but the 1 is ridiculously priced. Anybody know of any places I haven't looked yet?

    The recipe calls for wildflower honey, but I've heard it's pretty hit or miss depending on location. I'm open to whatever. I've used Orange Blossom in the past.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Posts
    357

    Default

    Are you saying you want to buy exactly 4 lbs of honey? The added expense of buying 5 lbs is to much?

    You can buy 5 lbs of Clover honey at Costco.

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darigoni View Post
    Are you saying you want to buy exactly 4 lbs of honey? The added expense of buying 5 lbs is to much?

    You can buy 5 lbs of Clover honey at Costco.
    It's not the expense, its the fact of what would I do with the other pound? Can't make another batch with a single pound

    EDIT: Also, there are no Costco stores in my state

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Put the extra pound in a mason jar and use it on your Cheerios. Or, get the 3 lbs and pick up another pound from your grocery store.
    Dave from New Haven County

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Maylar View Post
    Put the extra pound in a mason jar and use it on your Cheerios. Or, get the 3 lbs and pick up another pound from your grocery store.
    The latter is what I was thinking. What do I need to make sure it has (or doesn't have) when I get that extra pound? Sorry for the newbie questions

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Posts
    357

    Default

    How about a Sam's Club? Walmart? 60 oz is 3.75 lbs.

    It kind of depends on what you are trying to do with your honey. I guess if I was basing the flavor of my mead around one specific variety of honey, then for the additional one pound I would be looking for something that wouldn't distract from that. If the 3 lb jar was light honey then I probably wouldn't want to use a one pound jar of dark (unless I was try get some added flavor). Above and beyond that, I guess I would try and find the rawest and unfiltered honey I could find. That being said; you cook with the ingredients that you have on hand.......

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    584

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperBacon View Post
    I'm looking at a new recipe and it calls for 4 pounds of honey. I'm having a hard time finding places to buy 4 pounds. Many places sell 3, some sell 5. Some places sell 3 and 1, but the 1 is ridiculously priced. Anybody know of any places I haven't looked yet?

    The recipe calls for wildflower honey, but I've heard it's pretty hit or miss depending on location. I'm open to whatever. I've used Orange Blossom in the past.

    Thanks!
    I had a crazy idea. Use the 4 pounds and save the last pound for your next batch of mead? do you really plan on NEVER making mead again?

  8. Default

    Just exploring my options

    What are your thoughts on this? https://m.bjs.com/wellsley-farms-org...00000000160869

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Posts
    357

    Default

    Looks like it's honey. Organic can be misleading. Unless the certification has changed, the USDA doesn't have an organic certification for honey. It would be nice to know what variety it is, but as they are not specifying my guess is that it's a blend.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Woodridge, IL
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Not to pile on the "Huh?!" train here, but you do realize that honey never, ever goes bad, right? The worst that happens is it crystallizes, but a touch of water and some heat (and not even the water sometimes), and it's good as new.

    I would not buy honey for mead from places like Costco or Sam's. Especially Sam's. Similarly, don't use "Sue Bee" or other processed honeys. You want raw, no (minimal) heat filtered honey.

    My thoughts on the above link..... Meh, Organic. Don't be fooled into paying higher prices for organic anything. There is no evidence organic is better quality by way of being organic. As above, the key word you want is "Raw". Raw honey. If the honey is pasteurized it loses many of it's unique flavors.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Posts
    357

    Default

    Have you gone to honey.com, to see if there are any apiaries in your area?

    What are you trying to do with the honey? If you give us a hint, I'm sure you'll get a lot suggestions on what to use.

  12. Default

    Yeah, I definitely agree not to use Costco/Sam's Club (suebee) honey. That stuff is garbage. Try eBay -- there's a company on there that ships raw, unfiltered honey in vacuum sealed bags, they do single pounds and only charge once for shipping. Can't remember the name but it's easy to find.

    Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Harford, NY
    Posts
    288

    My Social Networking

    Follow Shelley On Twitter Add Shelley on Facebook

    Default

    As a beekeeper, I can see no way of guaranteeing honey as organic, unless you control the entire forage within a 5 mile radius of your hives. Bees fly where bees will, and I can't tell them to only get nectar from organic sources.

    Wellsley "Farms" honey is just an international blend (https://www.honey.com/honey-locator/...oods-corporate), so you might as well just buy SueBee at that point.
    Mead Magic
    Turn Honey Into Wine
    With our complete one-gallon kit!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    538

    Default

    Costco honey looks like it would be a good deal, but I would avoid it because it's heat-treated. What you want is honey with minimal heat applied during extraction.

    Try Walkerhoneyfarm.com. You can buy honey by the quart or gallon (depending on variety) there and their stuff is high quality.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrMooCow View Post
    Not to pile on the "Huh?!" train here, but you do realize that honey never, ever goes bad, right? The worst that happens is it crystallizes, but a touch of water and some heat (and not even the water sometimes), and it's good as new.
    Not exactly. There were some people on these forums who had their honey start fermenting on them because it crystallizes then the added moisture on top allows yeast to start working. I think I've also heard Oskaar say on the gotmead podcast that fresher honey tastes better. By time the honey starts to darken and change taste. In sites such as this one full of beekeepers they claim (third post) some honeys taste more caramelized or buckwheat-ish by age. There are other such posts and threads http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...izing-with-age
    "Shouldn’t we say wine is a mead-like beverage made with grapes substituted for the honey?" - Steve Piatz

Similar Threads

  1. 25 pounds of honey fermenting in storage
    By Crowing in forum Mead NewBees - Post your Questions Here
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-15-2015, 12:55 AM
  2. How many pounds of a varietal honey to capture the flavor?
    By bernardsmith in forum Mead NewBees - Post your Questions Here
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-07-2014, 02:35 AM
  3. 14 pounds raw honey :)
    By B.J. Bell in forum Mead NewBees - Post your Questions Here
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-04-2011, 02:56 PM
  4. 4 pounds of BamaBeek Early Spring Honey - Ideas?
    By Johanneskai in forum Mead NewBees - Post your Questions Here
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-09-2010, 11:29 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •