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  1. #1

    Default Degassing, carboy cap vs bung

    Heya,

    48hrs into my first mead and first fermentation of anything (5 gal. traditional 1.121 SG, 71B, SNA -Ferm-K, DAP-, pure O2 for 120sec once at start and once at 24hr mark), Ive got all the details of the recipe and protocols I'm using in a long post I made a couple days ago that's awaiting moderator approval; hopfully that'll post soon.

    In the mean time, I've got a degassing question. The batch is currently fermenting in a carboy with an orange carboy cap and hose to jar of star san sitting at the base of the carboy. However, I'm not getting any bubbles. Only when I swirl the carboy will it bubble a decent amount.

    It is fermetning though, current gravity is 1.118 and before degassing with my lees stirrer just now, I pulled a sample to taste. It's already fairly carbonated.

    I'm thinking the lack of bubbles is because there has not been enough CO2 presure built up to push out the star san in the hose and bubble. Whereas with a normal airlock, the gas just rises straight through easy peasy, no presure required to release CO2.

    Should I be concenered that not enough CO2 is being able to degas naturally and therefore stressing out the yeast? Aka, should I switch to a normal airlock or just leave it, it's fine, you're over thinking your first batch?

    Cheers!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default

    It sounds like you are fine. You're over thinking it. Bubbles are only nice to look at and don't really tell you much, other than something's happening.

    "It's already fairly carbonated."

    You know that the CO2 that's generated during fermentation is different than that of having a carbonated beverage, right? To get a carbonated beverage, you'll need to ferment dry, then add a small amount of honey (or sugar) and then bottle it before the yeast have a chance to eat it (honey/sugar) and generate carbonation (bottle carbing).

  3. #3

    Default

    I'm no expert but from what I've read I think that the CO2 dissolved in there does make it more difficult for the yeast to do their jobs. That's why it's important to degas. I think you should be degassing twice a day during the early phase when the fermentation is going strong. I don't think it will hurt anything if you don't, but it will slow down the process and it will take longer. Again, I'm no expert. Also, if you detect any sulfur smells or any bad odors, it's important to degas ASAP to help get that out.
    Raisins are NOT nutrients for yeast... but french fries ARE!

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darigoni View Post
    It sounds like you are fine. You're over thinking it. Bubbles are only nice to look at and don't really tell you much, other than something's happening.

    "It's already fairly carbonated."

    You know that the CO2 that's generated during fermentation is different than that of having a carbonated beverage, right? To get a carbonated beverage, you'll need to ferment dry, then add a small amount of honey (or sugar) and then bottle it before the yeast have a chance to eat it (honey/sugar) and generate carbonation (bottle carbing).
    But I like the bubbles! Hahah yah I suppose I'd just like to stare at it and know the yeast is doing its thing. Also like the idea of more CO2 being able to naturally degas easier...but does it really matter or in this case is there even a big difference if it's not and I'm degassing regularly?

    How is the CO2 generated during fermentation different than that of a carbed beverage? CO2 is CO2. If it's dissolved in a solution, that solution is carbonated. In the sample I pulled, my mead was already fairly carbonated, meaning there was surprisingly a good amount of CO2 dissolved and I'm wondering if my carboy cap is adversely contributing to an increase in dissolved CO2 when normally through a standard airlock, that CO2 would be able to escape easier.

    Thanks for the tips Devin! I'm now degassing twice a day; hopefully that should be enough to not stress those buggers out too much. Will keen an eye...nose, out for any off smells

  5. #5

    Default

    So the CO2 made by the yeast doesn't really affect it enough to really care about. A deeper investigation will show you it's not necessary. But. You will want to continue to keep the yeast roused in suspension until you decide you want to stop rousing so the yeast can drop out to rack.

    Star-san isn't any harder to move than water. So that's not an issue at all. My hunch is you have a leak somewhere and it's getting out that way.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darigoni View Post
    It sounds like you are fine. You're over thinking it. Bubbles are only nice to look at and don't really tell you much, other than something's happening.

    "It's already fairly carbonated."

    You know that the CO2 that's generated during fermentation is different than that of having a carbonated beverage, right? To get a carbonated beverage, you'll need to ferment dry, then add a small amount of honey (or sugar) and then bottle it before the yeast have a chance to eat it (honey/sugar) and generate carbonation (bottle carbing).
    But I like the bubbles! Yah I suppose I'd just like to stare at it and know the yeast is doing its thing. Also like the idea of more CO2 being able to naturally degas easier...but does it really matter or in this case is there even a big difference if I'm degassing regularly?

    As Squatchy mentioned, probably not a big difference.

    Darigoni, how is the CO2 generated during fermentation different than that of a carbed beverage? CO2 is CO2. If it's dissolved in a solution, that solution is carbonated. In the sample I pulled, my mead was already fairly carbonated, meaning there was surprisingly a good amount of CO2 dissolved and I'm wondering if my carboy cap is adversely contributing to an increase in dissolved CO2 when normally through a standard airlock, that CO2 would be able to escape easier.

    Thanks for the tips Devin! I'm now degassing twice a day; hopefully that should be enough to not stress those buggers out too much. I’ll keep an eye…nose out for any off smells

  7. #7

    Default

    As I mentioned above. The CO2 doesn't bother them one bit. The difference between the CO2 in fermentation verses in carbonation is that during fermentation very little of if is suspended in the must. It's only passing through. In carbonation, it's under pressure and is forced into solution under that pressure. That's why you don't taste any carbonic acid in fermentation, and you do once it's fermented.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Squatchy View Post
    That's why you don't taste any carbonic acid in fermentation, and you do once it's fermented.
    Now that makes sense. Thanks for this!

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