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  1. Default Options for over backsweet

    I had a 1.004 gravity when I racked off (3.5 gallon total after lossing lots of volume due to sedimant) and added 10lbs of raisins and dates I also added 1lb more of honey

    Now it is WAY too sweet. Taste like syrup. 1.042 reading. I added 6 oz of bourbon. Not sure if that was good idea. Also added some cinnamon and dried chili peppers hoping to cut the sweeteness. Do I have to start over and repitch? I was hoping for a sweet mead but not this sweet. 1.02ish from what I read would have been good.

  2. Default

    You could let this one sit while you brew another batch and let it run dry. Once it is done, mix the two.

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    Heavy amounts of French or Hungarian Oak will also help reduce perceived sweetness.
    Hungarian more so than French.

    Sent from my SM-A520W using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Farmboyc View Post
    Heavy amounts of French or Hungarian Oak will also help reduce perceived sweetness.
    Hungarian more so than French.

    Sent from my SM-A520W using Tapatalk
    Thanks, I added some oak. Not too much but could add more

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rb2112br View Post
    You could let this one sit while you brew another batch and let it run dry. Once it is done, mix the two.
    Thanks, is head space an issue now? Since I removed fruit and racked to a 6 gallon bucket. There is a bout 3 gallons in there.

  6. #6

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    Have you added SO2 yet? It not, it should still keep fermenting slowly. Although you didn't say what strain or what your SG was
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Squatchy View Post
    Have you added SO2 yet? It not, it should still keep fermenting slowly. Although you didn't say what strain or what your SG was
    Have not added SO2. Removed fruit so now head space is alot. SG was 1.10

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by deaccat View Post
    Have not added SO2. Removed fruit so now head space is alot. SG was 1.10
    Since you added spirits. I'm pretty sure you killed your yeast and are stuck with what you have. You need to get on the SO2 add now that it's not going to change gravity any more
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Squatchy View Post
    Since you added spirits. I'm pretty sure you killed your yeast and are stuck with what you have. You need to get on the SO2 add now that it's not going to change gravity any more
    What do you think of starting another batch. Drying it out and mixing together?

  10. #10
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    I think rb2112br suggested doing just that. Not a bad idea IMO. Maybe just run a traditional to dry and mix in small portions until you think you might have it where you want it.

    I might be a little confused on the exact situation, but it sounds like you have 3.5 gallons sitting in a 6 gallon bucket, and it's likely done fermenting due to the bourbon being added. Only way to tell for sure is to measure the SG now, and then compare by measuring SG a couple days from now (same SG reading means it's likely done). If fermentation is done, then my thinking would be that you need to consider SO2 stabilization. I would feel uncomfortable with 3.5 gallons in a 6 gallon bucket if it's done fermenting. I'd personally want to get it in a container with a lot less head space and one that I could seal up with a airlock (just in case fermentation kicks in somehow).

  11. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4give View Post
    I think rb2112br suggested doing just that. Not a bad idea IMO. Maybe just run a traditional to dry and mix in small portions until you think you might have it where you want it.

    I might be a little confused on the exact situation, but it sounds like you have 3.5 gallons sitting in a 6 gallon bucket, and it's likely done fermenting due to the bourbon being added. Only way to tell for sure is to measure the SG now, and then compare by measuring SG a couple days from now (same SG reading means it's likely done). If fermentation is done, then my thinking would be that you need to consider SO2 stabilization. I would feel uncomfortable with 3.5 gallons in a 6 gallon bucket if it's done fermenting. I'd personally want to get it in a container with a lot less head space and one that I could seal up with a airlock (just in case fermentation kicks in somehow).
    Thanks. I am going to do a taditional and mix. Any suggestions for a yeast for that? my homebrew shop said comercial meaderies use ale yeats to speed the process. It would be good if it was done a little sooner since I have the other batch done and waiting now that I will mix.

    i will stabilize today. it is actually only 3 gallons. Once I stabilize should I move to my 4.75 carboy for less head space or do I need to go buy a 3 gallon container?

  12. #12

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    If you did buy a smaller vessel that would be best. And beer yeast is no faster than wine yeast. It might drop out sooner. But it won't ferment any faster.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

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    Agree with Squatchy on the smaller container.

    The Scotts Lab Handbook for 2018 is a good resource. The yeasts DV10 and K1V are workhorses that can ferment faster with low nutrient requirements, and high ABV tolerances. QA23 is another good one IMO. I've had all of these strains ferment to below 1.000 (K1V went .996). Just follow good rehydration, aeration, and SNA protocols, and you should be fine (it goes without saying to make sure sanitation practices are good too).

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4give View Post
    Agree with Squatchy on the smaller container.

    The Scotts Lab Handbook for 2018 is a good resource. The yeasts DV10 and K1V are workhorses that can ferment faster with low nutrient requirements, and high ABV tolerances. QA23 is another good one IMO. I've had all of these strains ferment to below 1.000 (K1V went .996). Just follow good rehydration, aeration, and SNA protocols, and you should be fine (it goes without saying to make sure sanitation practices are good too).

    I switched over to smaller container. Started a new batch of traditional I will blend when finished.. 3 gallons in a 6 gallon bucket. Read that is not an issue for primary. No bubbles in airlock yet 15 hrs in but that is common as well. Thanks everyone for thier help!

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4give View Post
    Agree with Squatchy on the smaller container.

    The Scotts Lab Handbook for 2018 is a good resource. The yeasts DV10 and K1V are workhorses that can ferment faster with low nutrient requirements, and high ABV tolerances. QA23 is another good one IMO. I've had all of these strains ferment to below 1.000 (K1V went .996). Just follow good rehydration, aeration, and SNA protocols, and you should be fine (it goes without saying to make sure sanitation practices are good too).
    I'm curious why you say they ferment faster?
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

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    Hi Squatchy. The fact that Scotts Lab Handbook rates those strains as "fast" would be my biggest reason for making that statement. Albeit, I have VERY limited experience experimenting with yeast strains, that experience to date tells me that they are able to take a mead to dry faster than others. Especially when we consider how fast it gets to a higher ABV. I guess that brings up a possible consideration as to how we define "fast".

    For example, if we have the same starting SG, but a lower ABV strain against say K1V, does "fast" mean:
    1 - Simply time: to 1/3 break, or time to when it finishes (SG isn't moving)
    2 - OR, by ABV: If K1V taps out at 19% in your must, and the lower ABV strain taps out at 14%, but both over the same amount of time, would K1V be considered a faster fermenting strain?

  17. #17

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    Generally speaking. It seems that except for a few "slowish" strains everyone moves along close enough that I have never really noticed any one strain being faster enough that they stood out.

    And just off the top of my head I only know of one mead that is surely slower than the others. ( Assmanhaussen) and one that can be a cry baby and is sometimes a primadonna (D47)

    Thanks for pointing that out. I realized after you said that. It is true and was something that never really stuck in the front of my mind.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

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