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Thread: Crushed egg shells

  1. Default Crushed egg shells

    I also just recently read somewhere that you can use egg shells for clarifying as a direct substitute for egg whites, but I've only read it in one place. And I forgot where that was.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Crushed egg shells

    Quote Originally Posted by edacsac
    I also just recently read somewhere that you can use egg shells for clarifying as a direct substitute for egg whites, but I've only read it in one place. And I forgot where that was.
    They may not work as well as egg whites. Take a look here (scroll down to the "Clarifying Wine" section):

    http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/finishin.asp

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    Dan McFeeley

    "Meon an phobail a thogail trid an chultur"
    (The people's spirit is raised through culture)

  3. Default Re: Crushed egg shells

    Thanks Dan, that was a very informative read. Good stuff!

  4. Default Re: Crushed egg shells

    You might try this one too:
    http://www.makewine.com/makewine/fining.html

    Have fun,
    Ted

  5. Default Re: Crushed egg shells

    Eggs, while scientifically great for clarifying, is something I'd stay away from. Especially in the case of something that's aging. Eggs are porus and able to pickup flavors from anything they touch or in the air around them. It's not to easy to tell if your cooking the crap outta them in a consumme or something like that, but would make an effect on your brew.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Crushed egg shells

    While reading about fining wine, I found it interesting (still do) that Egg Albumen amoung the agents used. Prior to this the only place I'd heard of it's use was in violin finishing.

    As a sealant / hardener, the egg white is beat stiff then placed in a strainer over a bowl for 24 hours. The clear liquid that seeps off is what is used. The varnish can be stripped from a violin that has been sealed in this manner but the Albumen seal remains, this is due partly to the material having soaked into the wood.

    As to wine making, it would appear the whole albumen is used for fining. I've seen powdered egg albumen on a number of beer / wine making web sites, this is what I would use for fining rather then raw / wet egg white where I to use it at all.

    Anthony

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Crushed egg shells

    Winemakers along the central coast of Croatia have been known to use the egg whites from pigeon eggs as a fining agent. I never have personally, but I've heard my uncles and their buddies talk about it.

    Cheers,

    Oskaar
    Is it tasty . . . precious?

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