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Thread: Powdered Oak Mor

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    908

    Default Powdered Oak Mor

    My LHBS has Oak Mor (powdered) rather than cubes or chips. There is no description of type of oak so I am a little reticient to try this. Research 'out there' has provided the following:

    Another fast method is oak powder ($4.89), also
    called Oak mor, which is ground to the consistency of saw
    dust in order to quickly impart oak flavor. It is commonly
    found in wine kits and with time will settle out of wine in the
    fermenter. Multiple ounces are often added to wine allowing
    an even shorter contact time.


    http://www.keystonehomebrew.com/newsnov02.pdf

    Has anyone used this Mor in their mead?
    What sort of flavor does it impart (good bad)?
    Since it is powdered, it will infuse the mead far quicker, so what amounts have you added for a 1 gallon batch?
    How well did it settle out?
    Would you use it again?

    Thanks,

    Angus
    Chan fhíach cuírm gun a còmhradh

    A feast is no use without good talk.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    The OC
    Posts
    7,874

    Default Re: Powdered Oak Mor

    I've used oak powder and was less than impressed. Mono-dimensional oak flavor, very thin on character and overall not what I expected. YMMV.

    Cheers,

    Oskaar
    Is it tasty . . . precious?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Boulder County, CO
    Posts
    644

    Default Re: Powdered Oak Mor

    I believe "good things come to those who wait" and would personally avoid using oak "powder". I'm a big fan of oak and use some level of oak in most of my meads these days. I've been very pleased with the cubes sold by Stavin or LD Carlsson.

    IIRC, Oskaar and others have mentioned that cubes are preferable to chips as the qualities of the oak are absorbed more slowly and evenly and there's less of a danger of extracting undesirable qualities of the wood. I would think that oak powder would be more likely still to extract the "wrong" qualities (or in the "wrong" ratios) than one would hope for. Not to mention, you'd have much less control overall of the outcome.

    Kirk

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