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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
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    Default Oldest Pottery discovered in China

    I saw this piece of news today where they have found pottery shards dating from 18,000 years ago in Yuchanyan Cave.
    "Pottery initially serves as a cooking and storage facility. Later on, some pottery vessels become symbols of power and social status, as well as examples of art," Lu said. "Pottery is still an important part of human culture today."
    Yeah, cooking and storage. We got that. It'll be interesting to see if they find any evidence of fermented beverages from this site. You gotta figure, as soon as someone figured how to make a pot, one of Oskaar's ancestors was there figuring out how to ply the redheads with his brew.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  2. #2
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    Evergreen, CO (west of and above the Denver smog!)
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    Default

    I see they quote Patrick McGovern in this article. He's become the "go to" recognized expert in early drink storage systems!
    Na zdrowie!

    Wayne B.

  3. #3

    Default

    I also saw that McGovern has a new book out, "Uncorking the Past." That should be a good one! I'll have to go looking for a copy . . .
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    Dan McFeeley

    "Meon an phobail a thogail trid an chultur"
    (The people's spirit is raised through culture)

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by McFeeley View Post
    I also saw that McGovern has a new book out, "Uncorking the Past." That should be a good one!
    I'm looking forward to it, though I'm still plodding through "Ancient Wine." It is a bit dry, but loaded with facts in a very academic style. While it is slow reading, I am actually learning a lot from it.

    One thing that came through was that most all of the ancient wine samples show evidence of Terebinth Tree resin which was probably added as a preservative (and flavoring agent? it would certainly have left a flavor good or bad). It has me interested in trying to create a brew using terebinth resin, but I have been unable to locate any.

    Yes, there are pine resins and many other potential resins that could be used as a substitute, but I would really like to make a batch using authentic Terebinth resin. I understand it is still used in the Middle East, sometimes in chewing gum. Does anyone have any idea where it can be obtained?

    Medsen
    Last edited by Medsen Fey; 06-03-2009 at 01:54 PM.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Elk Grove, CA
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    Default

    I know someone living in Yemen right now...I'll ask.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Medsen Fey View Post
    I'm looking forward to it, though I'm still plodding through "Ancient Wine." It is a bit dry, but loaded with facts in a very academic style. While it is slow reading, I am actually learning a lot from it.

    One thing that came through was that most all of the ancient wine samples show evidence of Terebinth Tree resin which probably added as a preservative (and flavoring agent? it would certainly have left a flavor good or bad). It has me interested in try to create a brew using terebinth resin, but I have been unable to locate any.

    Yes, there are pine resins and many other potential resins that could be used as a substitute, but I would really like to make a batch using authentic Terebinth resin. I understand it is still used in the Middle East, sometimes in chewing gum. Does anyone have any idea where it can be obtained?

    Medsen
    I have McGovern's book on Ancient Wine also, like all of his stuff, well worth reading through. McGovern is a fascinating person, brilliant scholar, think he's still living in the basement of the museum where he set up a home with he and his wife, seems more comfortable with his spade beard and flannel shirts.

    Terebinth resin -- Ken Schramm has had some speculations on this, he might want to weigh in on this thread.

    Really fascinating how these wines have persisted in the Greek Retsina style wine.
    <><><><><><><><><><>
    <><><><><><><><>
    Dan McFeeley

    "Meon an phobail a thogail trid an chultur"
    (The people's spirit is raised through culture)

  7. #7

    Default

    Still thinking on this -- one of our older members, Miriam Kresh, might know something about terebinth resin . . . she doesn't visit as regularly as she used to, but I think I can get her attention.
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    <><><><><><><><>
    Dan McFeeley

    "Meon an phobail a thogail trid an chultur"
    (The people's spirit is raised through culture)

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Medsen Fey View Post
    One thing that came through was that most all of the ancient wine samples show evidence of Terebinth Tree resin which was probably added as a preservative (and flavoring agent? it would certainly have left a flavor good or bad). It has me interested in trying to create a brew using terebinth resin, but I have been unable to locate any.
    One of my sisters in laws is from Lebanon. She remembers as a child a chewing gum made with wax (bees wax??) and a resin. She wasn't sure what it was. However it was and still is very popular. She thought that an Arabic grocery store might carry it.

    Also, the Terebinth Tree is called a bunch of different names. Maybe the resin is available under a different name?


    Common names: Turpentine tree, terebinth tree (English); térébinthe, pistachier térébinthe (French); Tarpentinpistazie, Terpentinbaum (German); terebinto, pistacchio terebinto, corno frassano, scotano campestre, pistacchio giallo (Italian); botom (Arabic), other vernacular names: bel‘ās, ‘alk el-botom, ‘alk al-jabal (the resin of the tree); thamāra, (the fruits); habbet khadrā` (the fruits); ‘afas (the galls, often the leaves of Pistacia atlantica have galls, produced by Pemphigus utricularis Pass.).
    Al

  9. #9
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    Default

    In Scientific American, no less...complete with semi-buxom beer wench.

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