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  1. #61
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    It should be listed if it is added. The really dark cherries won't need the sulfites as much as the red-red ones. Basically if it is light and bright, suspect there are preservatives involved. Brown, dark colors probably don't have sulfites, but it's good to check.
    Want to see something added to the GotMead Glossary? PM me! Didn't know we had a glossary? Check the top row of links.

  2. #62

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    Thanks... These are (basically) Bing cherries, not the other kind... Very dark color... Basically, the fruit you find at the grocery store, with pits removed and dehydrated (with sugar added according to the label)...

  3. #63
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    The cherries and blueberries sold in bulk around here don't contain sulphites but the apricots do... but the cherries and blueberries (and raisins) also often contain vegetable oil to keep them from sticking together...
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medsen Fey View Post
    If possible, can you post the details from the E-mail you received from Wyeast for future reference. I have my doubts about that number... I would expect 1 gram per gallon to provide something around 25 ppm.
    Golddiggie and I contacted Jess Caudill at Wyeast to clarify this and he said the prior number was erroneous. At 1 g/gal, the Wyeast nutrient provides 30 ppm YAN. That certainly makes much more sense and is a good number to remember for future reference.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medsen Fey View Post
    Golddiggie and I contacted Jess Caudill at Wyeast to clarify this and he said the prior number was erroneous. At 1 g/gal, the Wyeast nutrient provides 30 ppm YAN. That certainly makes much more sense and is a good number to remember for future reference.
    Also makes more sense as to why my higher gravity must's have needed so much more nutrient (than I thought they would) compared with the lower gravity melomel... Ended up using 16g in the 3 gallon batch and 20g so far in the 5 gallon batch (expect it to be close enough to break tonight to add the final 10g of nutrient)...

    Now if we could only get them to tell us what else is in the mixture...

    Oh, and they said it was FAN, not YAN...

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
    Oh, and they said it was FAN, not YAN...
    Another slight oversight on their part. Since the mixture contains DAP, the nitrogen is not just Free Amino Nitrogen, but also includes Ammonium nitrogen and thus the term Yeast Assimilable Nitrogen is more appropriate. However, I wasn't going to split hairs with someone trying hard to help us with good info.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Medsen Fey View Post
    Another slight oversight on their part. Since the mixture contains DAP, the nitrogen is not just Free Amino Nitrogen, but also includes Ammonium nitrogen and thus the term Yeast Assimilable Nitrogen is more appropriate. However, I wasn't going to split hairs with someone trying hard to help us with good info.
    LMAO!!! N is N no matter where it comes from, right?? I think, before I start any MORE batches (got four going right now... oy) I'll find a good source for cheap yeast that I can boil to use as nutrients in another batch...

    Would that be good in beer brewing as well as mead making? Oh, and why do you make mead but brew beer?

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
    Oh, and why do you make mead but brew beer?

    brew

    /bru/ Show Spelled[broo] Show IPA
    –verb (used with object) 1. to make (beer, ale, etc.) by steeping, boiling, and fermenting malt and hops.

    2. to make or prepare (a beverage, as tea) by mixing, steeping, soaking, or boiling a solid in water.



    In making a beer you have to brew with the grain to extract the starch and covert to sugars. In making a mead or wine, you don't need to boil anything.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  9. #69
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    Yeah, it's a little depressing that we don't have as nice a name for us as brewers do... what are wine makers called again, vintners? Also cool. Mead maker is what it is though, at least it has some alliteration, better than nothing.

  10. #70

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    Somehow, Medsen, I KNEW you would have the right answer...

    Batch #4, the Mocha Madness had nothing boiled, I used some 'hot' water to help get the honey out of the 1 pound bottles, but I could hold them (plastic) in my hands by the time I got to using the warmed/heated water... I poured a little out of the kettle into the bucket too, to help get things into solution, and then added the rest out of the filtration system (sits under the sink, with a spout in the sink)... I'm liking the 'no boil' method, or one where you don't really even need to use a pot... Thinking that the next batch (when a carboy is free) will be pretty much the same... Use water just warm enough to get the honey into solution, then put it into the carboy and get cranking...

    Less process than brewing beer at the start, but mead (I'm finding) needs more attention during the first week (or so) until it hits that 1/3 break... Then you can relax a bit...

  11. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by AToE View Post
    Yeah, it's a little depressing that we don't have as nice a name for us as brewers do... what are wine makers called again, vintners? Also cool. Mead maker is what it is though, at least it has some alliteration, better than nothing.
    How about "Liquid gold architect's"? You could use 'engineer' too, if you really wanted to...

  12. #72
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    Less process than brewing beer at the start, but mead (I'm finding) needs more attention during the first week (or so) until it hits that 1/3 break... Then you can relax a bit...
    That's what really messes with experience brewers who're looking at mead I find. Talking to people at the brewclub, it's totally inside out thinking for them to make something that takes almost no time to put together (barring melomels, which always take hours for me) but then requires so much attention during fermentiong.

    Pitch into an unboiled, unpastuerized, unsulfited must?! Crazy talk!

    No starter? More insanity! What's this rehydration you speak of? (all the LHBS around here either sell liquid yeast only for serious brewers, and dried ale yeast is for non serious people who'll just toss it in apparently...)

    Aerating often until the 1/3 mark in the ferment? This is pure dangerous voodoo to people who fear oxygen like they fear bullets (and rightly so with beer, though I hear some "big" beers are aerated some nowadays).

    Taking SG readings DURING the fermentation? Same deal, brewers generally don't want to even touch the thing during fermentation, let alone actually put something into it!

    Add nutrients, and sometimes in multiple steps? Seems like a lot of work to someone used to working with malts tht provide all the nutrients a yeast could want.


    It's pretty funny sometimes.

    (and not that they don't know about fermenting, it's just such a different process for them that it takes them some getting used to. Just like doing beer freaked me out for quite a while coming from a mead background)

  13. #73
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    My son and I have had those exact conversations about beer vs mead. He still gets freaked out about the daily attention I pay my mead .

  14. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by AToE View Post
    That's what really messes with experience brewers who're looking at mead I find. Talking to people at the brewclub, it's totally inside out thinking for them to make something that takes almost no time to put together (barring melomels, which always take hours for me) but then requires so much attention during fermentiong.

    Pitch into an unboiled, unpastuerized, unsulfited must?! Crazy talk!
    Surprised they didn't burn you as a witch!...

    Quote Originally Posted by AToE View Post
    No starter? More insanity! What's this rehydration you speak of? (all the LHBS around here either sell liquid yeast only for serious brewers, and dried ale yeast is for non serious people who'll just toss it in apparently...)
    See, the LHBS I went to for my first round (and subsequent rounds) of hardware advised me to use the liquid yeast, since it can give you a better product... For a few dollars more, you get something better? I said... Yup... Gimme...

    Quote Originally Posted by AToE View Post
    Aerating often until the 1/3 mark in the ferment? This is pure dangerous voodoo to people who fear oxygen like they fear bullets (and rightly so with beer, though I hear some "big" beers are aerated some nowadays).

    Taking SG readings DURING the fermentation? Same deal, brewers generally don't want to even touch the thing during fermentation, let alone actually put something into it!

    Add nutrients, and sometimes in multiple steps? Seems like a lot of work to someone used to working with malts tht provide all the nutrients a yeast could want.


    It's pretty funny sometimes.

    (and not that they don't know about fermenting, it's just such a different process for them that it takes them some getting used to. Just like doing beer freaked me out for quite a while coming from a mead background)
    See, that's why I'm glad I decided to start both at roughly the same time... I see the benefits both processes have for each product, as well as how each works... Beer is a 'hot and fast' method to me... You do all the heavy lifting at the start, then have a couple of weeks to recover... Mead, is almost no lifting up front, and medium level work until the 1/3 break, then it's light duty to completion.. Granted, you're talking more than a few weeks (typically) and then forget about getting something in under a few months (with a few exceptions, or depending on what you're making)...

    If you think of it like painting, beer is [mostly] paint by numbers, where mead is oil based paint on a stretched canvas... Both are art, but some people appreciate what goes into the oil painting... While others just want to get ripped right NOW!

    While I do plan on making sure I always (now) have a supply of beer on hand, I'm looking forward to the development the mead will go through... Trying to get an used freezer for the current batches to age inside of once they're ready... I've figured out the perfect spot to put a 5cf chest freezer, or a little larger if that's all I can get... Just don't want to buy something brand new... Would prefer to have a smaller one, so that I can (maybe) get another later to 'cold brew' some beer... Or at least ensure it's closer to the optimum temperature when in secondary...

    Oh, and learning to make mead made me brave enough to tweak the porter I have going when I racked it into secondary... Also mead making/engineering, has made me want to check on the beers more often... I want to test them to see what's going on... I have to hold myself back right now to let them do what they need to... But man, it ain't easy... Looking forward to seeing how the porter comes out...

  15. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildoates View Post
    My son and I have had those exact conversations about beer vs mead. He still gets freaked out about the daily attention I pay my mead .
    He's just jealous... lol

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
    If you think of it like painting, beer is [mostly] paint by numbers, where mead is oil based paint on a stretched canvas... Both are art, but some people appreciate what goes into the oil painting... While others just want to get ripped right NOW!
    I know quite a few folks who would likely take issue with that analogy - but I have to admit as a brewer/meadmaker who enjoys the mead process more, I appreciate that mental image!

    But perhaps a better analogy would be the difference between painting with watercolor vs. using oils. Both take serious skill and practice to perfect, but each requires specialized knowledge and ability to bring unique techniques to bear on the canvas in order to be successful.
    Na zdrowie!

    Wayne B.

  17. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by wayneb View Post
    I know quite a few folks who would likely take issue with that analogy - but I have to admit as a brewer/meadmaker who enjoys the mead process more, I appreciate that mental image!

    But perhaps a better analogy would be the difference between painting with watercolor vs. using oils. Both take serious skill and practice to perfect, but each requires specialized knowledge and ability to bring unique techniques to bear on the canvas in order to be successful.
    Thinking a little deeper on the analogy, it could be more like the difference between using oils and acrylics... Oils can take years to fully dry/harden, where acrylics are dry, sometimes, in minutes, very rarely longer than a fraction of an hour... Unless you do something to extend the drying time, and make for a longer 'workable' period... I've actually painted with both, and prefer oils many times over... Add a common (at least when I was into it) element, such as linseed oil, and your drying time is really long... Go the other side, and thin the paint with your solvent/paint thinner, and you have a much faster drying time (well, depending on how thick you lay it on)... You also tend to work in layers with oils, where not so with acrylics (the nature of the medium makes it damned difficult, if not impossible to 're-work' later)...

    Wow, didn't think I'd every find a practical use for my BFA... lol

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