Shop Bee Folks for your Honey!Shop Bee Folks for your Honey!
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 101 to 108 of 108
  1. #101
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Calgary AB Canada
    Posts
    4,066

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiwas View Post
    Thanks I won't stop the yeast, but rather just backsweeten it. I won't even bother to get it sparkling, and if I do, I'd rather use co2 than have it ferment in the bottle.

    Cheers!
    The other good thing about force carbonation (as opposed to boottle ferment carb) is that you can have it both sweet and sparkling. If you do it the ferment in the bottle method, it has to be dry (otherwise it will either not carbonate because the yeast have maxed out, or it could blow up and kill you because they'll eat too much sugar).
    ~AToE (A Thing of Eternity... it's a nerd thing...)

    AKA: Alan H

  2. #102

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AToE View Post
    The other good thing about force carbonation (as opposed to boottle ferment carb) is that you can have it both sweet and sparkling. If you do it the ferment in the bottle method, it has to be dry (otherwise it will either not carbonate because the yeast have maxed out, or it could blow up and kill you because they'll eat too much sugar).
    My thought exactly It's a bit more expensive, though, but they sell used cornelius barrels
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Elk Grove, CA
    Posts
    2,373

    Default

    It's on my list to go that direction, but it'll have to wait for now. In the meantime I'll have to go the old-fashioned way and bottle condition.

    My list is distressingly long, by the way.

  4. #104

    Default

    I'm flirting with some beer people, and hopefully I can bring my cornie to them for some co2
    Please excuse me for asking lots of question. It's really your fault! Because you're an awesome group of people too willing to answer questions, I just find more thing I wonder about as I learn more. So, sorry for that

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Elk Grove, CA
    Posts
    2,373

    Default

    My son and his Oslo brew buddies are thinking about heading in that direction too, although now that his Master's is done he needs to get a job, so he can afford more toys.

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    On one of 7000+ islands in the Pacific
    Posts
    637

    Default 2 newbie questions

    a. What happens if I add too much yeast to a must? Say, 10g (2 packs) to a 1-gallon batch... not that I'm planning to but I'm wondering what would happen?

    b. What happens when oxygen is added during racking? I've read that it's a bad thing, but never really WHY it's a bad thing...

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    4,958

    Default

    Hi THawk and welcome to GotMead!

    Yeast pitch rates and oxygenation/oxidation are fairly common topics, so you should be able to find some good info with a quick search of the forum.

    In short, adding a lot of yeast means that the weaker yeast will give up early in the fermentation, spill their guts, and the other yeast will gobble (parts of) them up. Exploding yeast is autolysis, and it can lend a yeasty flavor to your mead that might not be what you're going for. Usually you need to pitch quite a lot of yeast to risk this particular flaw, but 10g/gallon is probably getting close to that level.

    Oxygen is a pretty good oxidizer, you can probably tell that from the name. Early in fermentation the yeast will take up dissolved oxygen and use it for their metabolism. Once the mead is done and the yeast aren't doing anything, oxygen in the mead can cause chemical reactions, changing the color, flavor, and aroma of your mead. These changes can lead to something like sherry or Madeira, or on the other end of the spectrum wet cardboard or dank must. Usually neither of those possibilities is what you're going for, and controlling things to get one rather than the other takes some work. To see oxidation first-hand, pour a glass and leave it on your table overnight. It will not taste the same in the morning.
    Want to see something added to the GotMead Glossary? PM me! Didn't know we had a glossary? Check the top row of links.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    On one of 7000+ islands in the Pacific
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Thanks! Getting ready to rack my first batch... can't wait!

    Quote Originally Posted by akueck View Post
    Hi THawk and welcome to GotMead!

    Yeast pitch rates and oxygenation/oxidation are fairly common topics, so you should be able to find some good info with a quick search of the forum.

    In short, adding a lot of yeast means that the weaker yeast will give up early in the fermentation, spill their guts, and the other yeast will gobble (parts of) them up. Exploding yeast is autolysis, and it can lend a yeasty flavor to your mead that might not be what you're going for. Usually you need to pitch quite a lot of yeast to risk this particular flaw, but 10g/gallon is probably getting close to that level.

    Oxygen is a pretty good oxidizer, you can probably tell that from the name. Early in fermentation the yeast will take up dissolved oxygen and use it for their metabolism. Once the mead is done and the yeast aren't doing anything, oxygen in the mead can cause chemical reactions, changing the color, flavor, and aroma of your mead. These changes can lead to something like sherry or Madeira, or on the other end of the spectrum wet cardboard or dank must. Usually neither of those possibilities is what you're going for, and controlling things to get one rather than the other takes some work. To see oxidation first-hand, pour a glass and leave it on your table overnight. It will not taste the same in the morning.

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456

Similar Threads

  1. Newbie general questions
    By chouettes in forum Mead NewBees - Post your Questions Here
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-07-2010, 11:27 AM
  2. Fruit in general =(
    By beninak in forum Troubleshooting your Mead
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-26-2007, 11:00 AM
  3. General queries
    By Tyred in forum Mead NewBees - Post your Questions Here
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 12-19-2005, 09:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •