Shop Bee Folks for your Honey!Shop Bee Folks for your Honey!
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 81 to 85 of 85
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    8,394

    Default

    I generally stabilize a week or two before I bottle, unless I have concerns about a batch. Which means sometimes I get distracted and leave stuff in the carboy for years too. As long as the airlock doesn't go dry, usually I have no problems with oxidation...

    Glad you finally got this bottled, glad it's tasty!!
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

  2. #82

    Default

    I've tasted other peoples stuff that sat with no headspace in a glass carboy sealed with wax for a few years and was left sealed since the day they locked it up and it still oxidizes. That's why I start SO2 management right from the very start personally
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    8,394

    Default

    That's totally fair. It's possible I don't taste oxidation in my own stuff because I'm pretty lax about SO2 management and maybe everything's a bit oxidized... I'll have to haul out some of my own stuff next time I need something to drink on Gotmead Live for a critical tasting.

    I have no way of testing for SO2 at the moment and I am pretty sure I prefer the sherry-like taste of oxidation to the taste of too much sulphite, and fortunately I get the sherry-like character when an airlock goes dry (yes I'm a bad example), rather than the wet cardboard oxidation I might get if fruit flies get their dirty little feet into things...
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

  4. #84

    Default

    So not to be mean here my friend. I tatsed your plywood mead at Mazer and it was so bad I had to hide my glass until I could pour it out. So maybe you don't taste it because you have gotten used to it.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ottawa, ON
    Posts
    8,394

    Default

    LOL "Chateau Plywood" _was_ a bad example.
    "The main ingredient needed is 'time' followed closely by 'patience'." - The Bishop 2013
    "When you consider that laziness and procrastination are the fundamentals of great mead, it is a miracle that the mazer cup happens." Medsen Fey, 2014
    "Sure it can be done. I've never heard of it, but I do things I've never heard if all the time. That is the beauty of being a brewer!" - Loveofrose, 2014
    "I tend to....um, er, experiment, and go outside the box. Sometimes outside the whole department store." - Ebonhawk, 2014

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345

Similar Threads

  1. Traditional Mead Glass/Mug
    By Terry Cox in forum Archives
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-21-2003, 05:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •