Shop Bee Folks for your Honey!Shop Bee Folks for your Honey!
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 66
  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    Posts
    8,771

    Default

    It sounds like it is moving OK. The medicinal quality is probably just the buckwheat showing itself. Don't be surprised if this batch needs aging. It is common with dark honey batches.



    Sent from my THINGAMAJIG with WHATCHAMACALLIT
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  2. #42

    Default

    Well, I am down to a burp every 25-30 seconds and thinking about taking another sample soon, but am now worried. I saw a colony-looking white mass on the top of my mead and not sure if that is bacteria or yeast... Should I post a picture or not freak out too much?
    Mead me.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    Posts
    8,771

    Default

    I wouldn't worry about it. In an active fermentation, you're not likely to have anything bad growing. That typically comes later, and with too much headspace and oxygen exposure.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  4. #44

    Default

    Alrighty. Also for this batch, I am thinking of doing the secondary in a plastic carboy (bubbler from NB). Any personal experience with that? I do have a glass 5 gallon, but want to save that for aging.
    Mead me.

  5. #45

    Default

    Sounds like a plan!
    You only go around once in life, but if you do it right, once is enough

  6. #46

    Default

    Racked to secondary today after 1.004 readings. Took a taste and while pretty strong, still had that medicinal taste. I figure I'll let it sit for a month or so in the plastic carboy and then over to the glass for the final few months and clarifying. Thoughts?
    Mead me.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    Posts
    8,771

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Maximus View Post
    Took a taste and while pretty strong, still had that medicinal taste.
    Buckwheat meads do tend to need more aging.



    Sent from my THINGAMAJIG with WHATCHAMACALLIT
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  8. #48

    Default

    So I've heard. Think I make a bad call on racking too early. I'll just let this one sit for even longer, but my only concern is aging for any significant amount of time in a plastic carboy, even one that is designed for wine/beer aging. Anywho, I figure 3 months in that and then kick it over to glass when I add clarifying agents and such.
    Mead me.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    Posts
    8,771

    Default

    Racking at 1.004 shouldn't be a problem. And letting it finish in a plastic container (if it is made of PET plastic) is fine. I've aged things in a PET container for up to a year with no issues. It sounds like everything will be good.




    Sent from my THINGAMAJIG with WHATCHAMACALLIT
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  10. #50

    Default

    Well, it looks like my previous posts were lost in the past couple days, but Medsen, this is the order I think will be right:

    1. Rack
    2. Back-sweeten to taste and measure gravity and add honey to match
    3. Stabilize and let sit for 30+ days or so (I have to due to Alaska trip)
    4. Clarify upon return and wait 24-48 hours.
    5. Bottle.

    Thoughts?
    Mead me.

  11. #51

    Default

    U should stabilize before u backsweeten bro


    Sent from The Age of Legends, trapped inside a Stasis Box

  12. #52

    Default

    Yeah, that was not exactly well thought-out... Still fried from building my hop and herb gardens :-). Corrected order:

    1. Rack
    2. Stabilize and let sit for 30+ days or so (I have an Alaska trip)
    3. Back-sweeten to taste and measure gravity and add honey to match (waiting after this?)
    4. Clarify upon return and wait 24-48 hours.
    5. Bottle.
    Last edited by Maximus; 04-13-2014 at 12:18 PM. Reason: I'm an idiot.
    Mead me.

  13. #53

    Default

    Sounds good, you might need more time after u back sweeten in order for perfect clarity of your mead. However certain fining agents like super kleer or whatever work magic


    Sent from The Age of Legends, trapped inside a Stasis Box

  14. #54

    Default

    Yeah, the "clarify" will be with super-kleer.
    Mead me.

  15. #55

    Default

    Nice. Look forward to seeing some pics of the bottled product


    Sent from The Age of Legends, trapped inside a Stasis Box

  16. #56
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    Posts
    8,771

    Default

    Actually the order I would recommend is:
    1. Rack
    2. Stabilize then wait 12-24 hours.
    3. Backsweeten to taste and measure gravity.
    4. Treat with fining agent. Keep under airlock.
    5. Leave it for 30 days.
    6. Confirm the gravity is unchanged.
    7. Bottle.


    Sent from my THINGAMAJIG with WHATCHAMACALLIT
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  17. #57

    Default

    This is an excellently educational thread. Thanks to everyone who contributed!

    It brings up something I was wondering. I'm doing my first batch now. About a week ago my fermentation finished (FG 0.996 for 72hrs) and I racked it from my plastic fermenter to a carboy to get it off the lees. Since then more lees have settled out, but the mead is still very cloudy to the point of being opaque. My plan going forward is to age the mead in bulk in the carboy for at least 6 months.

    I'm thinking I'll probably have to rack again at some point in the next week or two to get the mead off the new lees that are forming? I don't want them to start autolysing and make my mead taste yeasty.

    My main question is this: is it better to stabilize, back-sweeten, adjust acidity, and clarify now at the beginning of aging--the thought being to let the flavors marry and gain complexity during that time--or to do all that at the end of the bulk aging prior to bottling?

  18. #58
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    Posts
    8,771

    Default

    I find that it is useful to let the mead clear and age a little (like 6 months) before deciding on sweetening or other additions. As the mead clears and the hot alcohols mellow, you'll probably find you won't need to sweeten as much. If you do it early you may overshoot. After I stabilize and backsweeten I let it age for months (or years) before bottling which gives plenty of time to make sure the flavors marry and to make sure the yeast remain dormant.

    Sent from my THINGAMAJIG with WHATCHAMACALLIT
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  19. #59

    Default

    So I will be racking off the last of the lees and stabilizing this weekend and I thought that I should post a pic of this. Its pretty dark, but we'll see how it tastes soon I think. Not 100% sure of what to put at the bottom of the carboy to rack onto, but hope to have that straightened out soon. Thoughts?

    IMAG0290.jpg
    Mead me.

  20. #60

    Default First Batch Questions - Semi-Sweet Artasianal

    I have never used any, but I have heard others talk about using marbles

    Btw that mead has great color

    Sent from The Age of Legends, trapped inside a Stasis Box

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •