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Thread: Concern

  1. Default Concern

    Hi guys. I have just gone to take a look at my 2nd ever batch.. Bottled just before Xmas... They have a thick layer of sediment on the bottom. I am wondering if its just because I bottled to early... I had a sneaky taste and its OK.. Its not great but after a few months I'm not expecting it to be


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Brookline, NH
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    Default

    It sounds like you bottled to early. Just by the fact you asked and answered the question shows that you already suspect that. :-)

    It's hard NOT to end up with some dust in the bottom of a bottle (unless you are filtering), but a thick layer means that you either bottled to early or you back sweetened, without stabilizing, and you have fermentation going on in the bottle. When you "had a sneaky taste", did you have carbonation?

  3. #3

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    I'm guessing you were probably nowhere close to clear before you bottled. I see this everyday on FB. Use finning agents to clear it up before you bottle. You should be able to read a magazine on the other side of a 750.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Saratoga Springs , NY
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    Default

    But tannins and fruit particles will often drop out of solution even over years, which is why in the historical past red wines were often decanted. What you don't expect to see is a thick layer of sediment dropping out of solution. That does suggest that the mead was not truly clear before you bottled it.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by bernardsmith View Post
    But tannins and fruit particles will often drop out of solution even over years, which is why in the historical past red wines were often decanted. What you don't expect to see is a thick layer of sediment dropping out of solution. That does suggest that the mead was not truly clear before you bottled it.
    I agree friend. But I have found that even if you don't filter. You can do quite well if you fine with both positive and negative fining agents. In my opinion, this "stabilizes" the chemicals involved in such a large part of the crap that drops out even after it was clear and then bottled.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

  6. Default

    Thanks for the input guys.. Guess I was just too keen. No carbonation when I opened. Where do I go from here? Can I add anything to clear or just rebottle..

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WelshViking View Post
    Thanks for the input guys.. Guess I was just too keen. No carbonation when I opened. Where do I go from here? Can I add anything to clear or just rebottle..
    I would pour all of it back out and use fining agents. Let it clear and then rebottle if you have very much of it. Otherwise, I would just leave it and decant it before you drink it
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

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