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View Poll Results: What should I do?

Voters
6. You may not vote on this poll
  • 1.Stick to recepie and back sweeten with sugar

    0 0%
  • 2. It will be better to back sweeten with honey

    6 100.00%
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. Question Back sweetening pyment - honey or sugar

    Hello guys!

    I have a pyment recipe which is almost ready for back sweetening and it says to use sugar, but I always thought that for mead (well type of melomel really) it would be better to back sweeten with mead.

    I've tried it and it is definitely too dry for my liking, so I will back sweeten it for sure.

    Question is what should I do?
    1. Stick to recipe and add sugar
    2. Ignore recipe and back sweeten with honey

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Posts
    810

    Default

    Honey. ****

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darigoni View Post
    Honey. ****
    Thanks man, that's what I thought that mead/pyment/melomel should be always back sweeten with honey to add more of that flavour but I started doubting myself.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Posts
    810

    Default

    You'd only use sugar if you didn't have enough honey to do the job.

  5. Default

    If I don't have enough honey to do the job, I wait until I can get some more.

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darigoni View Post
    You'd only use sugar if you didn't have enough honey to do the job.

    I stocked up long time before coronavirus so I have plenty, I assume every mead maker beyond first batch keeps some extra

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Saratoga Springs , NY
    Posts
    1,560

    Default

    The thing about using honey to backsweeten is that it is likely to make your bright mead cloudy. But the thing about using honey is that you can emphasize either the flavor of the honey you used as the base of this mead OR you can highlight more complexity by using a different honey...

  8. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bernardsmith View Post
    The thing about using honey to backsweeten is that it is likely to make your bright mead cloudy. But the thing about using honey is that you can emphasize either the flavor of the honey you used as the base of this mead OR you can highlight more complexity by using a different honey...
    Interesting I didn't think of that. So is it flavour versus look choice?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    Posts
    8,840

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    If you briefly bring it to a boil with a little mead and skim it before you add it, that can prevent it causing cloudiness. I’m usually not in a hurry, and don’t mind waiting for clearing.

    I don’t have your recipe details, but have you stabilized it so it won’t ferment the added honey?
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  10. Default

    6 lbs. (2.7 kg) orange blossom honey
    (1) 96-oz. can Chenin Blanc grape juice concentrate (or your choice of
    other wine-grape juice)
    4 large pomegranates
    10 kiwi fruit
    Juice of 2 oranges
    8 tsp. acid blend
    0.25 tsp. sulfite
    1.5 tsp. tannin
    2 tsp. pectic enzyme
    2.5 tsp. potassium sorbate
    7.5 to 9 oz. (213 to 255 g) of sugar for final sweetening
    Wine yeast of choice
    Step-by-step
    Dissolve honey in enough warm water to bring volume to just over six gallons. Add rest of ingredients except sulfite, pectic enzyme, fruit and yeast. Remove 1 cup of must and heat it to 80 F (27 C), pitch yeast into cup of warm must. Add sulfite to the 6 gallons (23 L) of must and cover. After 1224 hours add the cup of fermenting mead starter to the 6 gallons (23 L) of must and stir well. Cover and fit airlock. Check must in 24 hours and stir, then add fruit and pectic enzyme to must. Ferment mead to dryness or near dryness and rack to secondary container. You may add a common fining agent if mead is dry at this racking, or allow the mead to clear naturally. Rack mead again in 34 weeks, and then again in 46 weeks (add a pinch of sulfite at each racking). Allow mead to clear and age for 46 months. For final sweetening 2 to 2.5% residual sugar is suggested. Dissolve 2.5 teaspoons of potassium sorbate in a small bit of water, and stir into the mead. Add the sweetening sugar. If mead is at room temperatures, you can stir the sugar right into the mead. If mead is at cooler temperatures, remove 23 cups of the mead and heat it to 80 F (27 C) in a sanitized pan, and dissolve your sugar in this. Add to mead and stir. Wait several days before bottling.

    That's the pyment I already modified it by replacing grape juice with fresh grape. And I do have campden tablet and potassium sorbate ready for stabilizing than few days later I will back sweeten.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    Posts
    8,840

    Default

    That sounds like that should work.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  12. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Medsen Fey View Post
    That sounds like that should work.
    I've tried it and for a gree and dry mead it tastes good. I modified it twice so far, I replaced grape juice with 700g of grapes (I've done it for 4.5 liters) and than I added another 250g of honey since initial sg was 1062 so I wuld end up with very small %. Now I think I will backsweeten it with honey and it should be good.

  13. Default

    After back sweetening how long do I wait to clear?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The Fusel Shack, in the swamp west of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
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    8,840

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    Not to be snarky, but until it is clear.
    Given the Chenin Blanc juice, if you can put is somewhere cold, like in a fridge, to precipitate any cream of tartar crystals that may also drop many other things out faster. Two to four weeks will allow you to see what is going to settle. Even then, after bottling, you will likely get sediment if you age this for more than a few months unless you fine it with Bentonite or some other agent.
    Lanne pase toujou pi bon
    (Past years are always better)

  15. Default

    I added K-meta and Potassium sorbate , then I waited few days and back sweeten. 2-4 weeks sounds reasonable.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by leyus View Post
    I added K-meta and Potassium sorbate , then I waited few days and back sweeten. 2-4 weeks sounds reasonable.
    Yes. that could work. I like to advise newbies to take a small portion of your stabilized mead in a glass and add some honey and wait a few days before you move to the big batch. Often times we hear of people who just went ahead and back sweetened the whole batch and it started to preferment. If you check the small glass first you can confirm you stabilized correctly before you make a mistake on the entire batch.
    7 out of 4 people have a hard time using their hydrometer!

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