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  1. Default In lieu of sulfates...

    A meadery I recently visited in Chico, CA said they don't use sulfates to prevent further fermentation of mead after bottling. Instead, they filter out all the yeast.

    How effective is filtering out the yeast before bottling? Sometimes, if the mead is too dry, I add some honey to each bottle before putting on the cork. However, if just a little bit of yeast gets in there, the cork will pop off a few weeks later.

    Does anyone have experience with this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Independence, KY and Greenacres, FL
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    Default Re: In lieu of sulfates...

    Haven't any experience with filtering but Another way would be to put the bottles in water in a large pot and bring slowly to a boil as they do in canning. The heat will kill whatever yeast is left. Kind of like pasterization.
    Good Luck, Joe

  3. Default Re: In lieu of sulfates...

    Joe,
    Do you mean to just sterilize the bottle by boiling it? How do I get rid of all of the yeast that might still be in the mead?

  4. Default Re: In lieu of sulfates...

    I think what Joe implies is to "boil" the bottled mead as you would the canned beans from your garden.

    Its good to be back. My previous identity was "Meadiac", but I couldn't retrieve my password, thus had to take on a new identity, which actually is my real one. So, I'm back to "newbie" status, where I probably should be anyway.

  5. Default Re: In lieu of sulfates...

    Filtration is a valid method to stop fermentation by removing yeast. i think you need the 0.5 micron size for this, but that is from memory. I'll Review my notes and get back to you on this issue.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Independence, KY and Greenacres, FL
    Posts
    1,200

    Default Re: In lieu of sulfates...

    I think what Joe implies is to "boil" the bottled mead as you would the canned beans from your garden.
    Thank you Marion. That is exactly what I meant. No doubt you are familiar with canning. Temperature will kill the yeast and any other bacteria present. If you get a book on canning or research on web it will give you recommended times and temperatures.
    Thanks again Marion
    Joe

  7. #7

    Default Re: In lieu of sulfates...

    Quote Originally Posted by James B
    A meadery I recently visited in Chico, CA said they don't use sulfates to prevent further fermentation of mead after bottling. Instead, they filter out all the yeast.

    How effective is filtering out the yeast before bottling? Sometimes, if the mead is too dry, I add some honey to each bottle before putting on the cork. However, if just a little bit of yeast gets in there, the cork will pop off a few weeks later.

    Does anyone have experience with this?
    It might depend on what kind of filtering process is being used. The late Robert Kime of the University of Cornell adapted ultrafiltration for commercial meadmaking. This is guaranteed to create a sterile honey must. Ordinary filtering with 0.5 micron pads should get out most of the yeast, but this is the last step of the filtering process. A coarse pad of 6.0 microns is used to get out the heavy gunk, then a medium pad of 1.0 microns.

    I haven't used filtering myself. My preference is to let the mead sit sufficiently long to clear on its own before sweetening it. I'm pretty patient -- I've let some meads sit for a year before doing anything with them. The mead has to be clear before you do this -- cloudy meads likely have suspended yeasts that will reactivate.




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    Dan McFeeley

    "Meon an phobail a thogail trid an chultur"
    (The people's spirit is raised through culture)

  8. Default Re: In lieu of sulfates...

    Ah yes, Joe. I'm quite familiar with put'n-up food. I have deep, in thu dirt, Southun roots. There are few things I enjoy more than carry'n on family tradition, such as canning, preserv'n and such. The beets are near ready to pull and the beans are start'n to run. What be long before the kettle is on the stove.

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  1. In lieu of sulfates...
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