Shop Bee Folks for your Honey!Shop Bee Folks for your Honey!
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 81
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Independence, KY and Greenacres, FL
    Posts
    1,200

    Default Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    This is one I have shared before but it may have got lost in the rebuild. It is so simple to make and you can make it without much equipment and with a multitude of variations. This could be a first Mead for the novice as it is almost fool proof. It is a bit unorthodox but it has never failed me or the friends I have shared it with.

    1 gallon batch

    3 1/2 lbs Clover or your choice honey or blend (will finish sweet)
    1 Large orange (later cut in eights or smaller rind and all)
    1 small handful of raisins (25 if you count but more or less ok)
    1 stick of cinnamon
    1 whole clove ( or 2 if you like - these are potent critters)
    optional (a pinch of nutmeg and allspice )( very small )
    1 teaspoon of Fleismanns bread yeast ( now don't get holy on me--- after all this is an ancient mead and that's all we had back then)
    Balance water to one gallon

    Process:

    Use a clean 1 gallon carboy
    Yes, CLEAN means no germs. Bacteria is the enemy of good mead. First make sure there is no dirt or other ingredients caked on the inside. If there is, clean it out with dishwater soap and water and a bottle brush. Then rinse well. Then fill carboy with 1 tablespoon of unscented bleach and clean water. Let it set at least 20 minutes to disinfect and then rinse out well with plenty of water so that the bleach doesnít impart a flavor our mead. This should be easy and only take a couple rinseings as long as you donít exceed 1 Tablespoon per gallon.

    Dissolve the required honey in 1 Ĺ quarts of warm water, making sure it is mixed well and pour in the carboy. Yes, you can use a funnel but make sure it is clean and disinfected. For this you can crush up 1 Campden tablet and mix with a cup of warm water to use to disinfect any needed items like the rubber bung and the funnel and any spoons you use for stirring the honey. Or you can use a bleach mixture like you did for the carboy with 1 Tablespoon per gallon. Remember to rinse off bleach mixture from items with clean tap water before using.

    Wash orange well to remove any pesticides and slice in eights --add orange (you can push em through opening big boy -- rinds included -- its ok for this mead -- take my word for it -- ignore the experts)

    Put in raisins, clove, cinnamon stick, any optional ingredients and fill to 3 inches from the top with cold water. ( need room for some foam -- you can top off with more water after the first few day frenzy)

    Shake the heck out of the jug with top on, of course. This is your sophisticated aeration process that provides needed oxygen in the mixture or as we in mead making call the Must. Oxygen at this point is important but once fermentation gets under way, oxygen will be our enemy.


    When at room temperature in your kitchen. Put in 1 teaspoon of bread yeast. ( No you don't have to rehydrate it first-- the ancients didn't even have that word in their vocabulary-- just put it in and give it a gentle swirl or not)( the yeast can fight for their own territory)

    Install water airlock. Don't forget to put in a little water in it. duh! Put in dark place. Yeast is a fungi which is a single cell organism that grows and operates more efficiently in the dark. It also prefers cooler temperatures typical of a basement but for this mead, anywhere between 65F and 80 will be fine. The warmer the temperature the faster will be the fermentation with this yeast. It will start working immediately or in an hour. (Don't use grandma's bread yeast she bought years before she passed away in the 90's)( Wait 3 hours before you panic or call me) After major foaming stops in a few days add some water and then keep your hands off of it. (Don't shake it! Don't mess with them yeastees! Let them alone except its okay to open your cabinet to smell every once in a while.

    Racking --- Don't you dare
    additional feeding --- NO NO
    More stirring or shaking -- Your not listening, don't touch

    After 2 months and maybe a few days it will slow down to a stop and clear all by itself. If the temperature is in the 70's it finish even faster You don't have to do a thing but watch and smell (How about that) (You are not so important after all) Then you can put a hose in with a small cloth filter on the end into the clear part and syphon off the golden nectar. If you wait long enough even the oranges will sink to the bottom but I never waitied that long. If it is clear it is ready. You don't need a cold basement. It does better in a kitchen in the dark. (like in a cabinet) likes a little heat (70-80). If it didn't work out... you screwed up and didn't read my instructions (or used grandma's bread yeast she bought years before she passed away) . If it didn't work out then take up another hobby. Mead is not for you. It is too complicated.
    If you were sucessful, which I am 99% certain you will be, then enjoy your mead. When you get ready to make a different mead you will probably have to unlearn some of these practices I have taught you, but hey--- This recipe and procedure works with these ingredients so don't knock it. It was your first mead. It was my tenth. Sometimes, even the experts can forget all they know and make a good ancient mead.
    Enjoy, Joe
    P.S. Please see important authors note to this post on page 5 of this thread.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Doesn't sound bad, and it's definitely my skill-level I'm going to stick with plan A, though. My experience with commercial mead taught me to pursue my own taste.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Independence, KY and Greenacres, FL
    Posts
    1,200

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    WikdWaze,
    OK thats fine. I can understand that. I just thought that since this mead will get you 4 bottles for less than the price of what you payed for 1 bottle of Chancers and you preferred it sweeter and with more complexity of taste; you might enjoy this one better while you are waiting for your own recipe to finish. The honey is available at Sam's for less than $10 and the rest of the igredients are household spices and grocery store yeast. It only requires (1) 1 gal jug and airlock. Don't let the simplicity lower your expectations. (Its surprisingly delicious) Anyway, its here for anyone to try. I still make it for Christmas gifts to friends and I hope you at least enjoyed reading the recipe.
    Joe

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Brisbane Australia
    Posts
    654

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Joe,

    you've wet my curiosity, so I think I'll give it a go (when things warm up down-under).
    I'm not sure I can keep myself from meddling with it - tho' there must be a first time for everything


    I note that you suggest not over-doing the nutmeg or allspice. Is this because of the harsh flavour it gives, that takes a long time to smooth out?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Independence, KY and Greenacres, FL
    Posts
    1,200

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesP
    Joe,
    you've wet my curiosity, so I think I'll give it a go (when things warm up down-under).
    I'm not sure I can keep myself from meddling with it - tho' there must be a first time for everything
    I note that you suggest not over-doing the nutmeg or allspice. Is this because of the harsh flavour it gives, that takes a long time to smooth out?
    James,
    Well the recipe as written is ready to drink when clear and doesn't require additional aging though it gets smoother with age. A little of these spices go a long way and I find beginners usually think that if one is good then two is better. The problem is that it doesn't work that way. Too much of anything can throw it out of balance just like too much or too little of a particular meat in a submarine sandwich. However, all do not share my beliefs as I notice some people put in more than 5 cloves in a gallon. That is their particular taste but for most it is too overpowering.
    Joe

  6. Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    I would really like to try your recipe. I will have to put it on my "to make" list since I think being a newbie and all I need to try certain other flavors first. I think I would appreciate this recipe more if the next batch I made was a plain traditional wildflower batch. As far as flavors go, I need to work my way up to that point I think, even if it is easy to make.

    As for cloves, I may even do a half a clove for a one gallon batch.

    I have a few questions for you though. What is the ABV of the finished product? And since it is drinkable when clear (being new I love that idea) how long does it take to finish from the time you pitch the yeast to the time it hits the glass/horn/Oskaar mug? A month or so?

    Maybe I will do this for christmas. This sounds like it would be interesting to try warm on a cold day as well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Independence, KY and Greenacres, FL
    Posts
    1,200

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Quote Originally Posted by Norskersword
    (snip)
    I have a few questions for you though. What is the ABV of the finished product? And since it is drinkable when clear (being new I love that idea) how long does it take to finish from the time you pitch the yeast to the time it hits the glass/horn/Oskaar mug? A month or so?
    About 14-15% ABV and sweet. Two months and a few days. Varies with temperature. The spices and the sweetness mask the harshness of a young mead so you can put it in your horn right away but it does get better. Its great for sipping on a cold winter night.
    Joe

  8. Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Very interesting, I like those numbers. I'll give it a shot.

  9. Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    When Joe first posted this recipe, before the crash n' rebuild, he was so enthusiastic about it that I just had to give it a try. By now, I've made two batches of it, and each has finished and been drinkable in three weeks, though they improve quite a bit if you leave them for six. That is still one of the quickest meads I know of.

    I find the cinnamon very strong, and the cloves not so much. My girlfriend and her girlfriend love it (gentlemen, take note) so I make it as is. Otherwise, I think I would use less of the former and more of the latter.

    All the ingredients AND all the equipment for this recipe cost me no more than $25 Canadian, so none of you have any excuse for not giving this a try. Fool proof, said the fool.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Independence, KY and Greenacres, FL
    Posts
    1,200

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Derf,
    I looked at the recipe in my second batch of 3 gallons and I noticed I did double up on the cloves (and left in the kitchen instead of the basement) this time. It took 5 weeks . Temperature and water hardness may make quite a difference in ferment times but like you said its basically fool proof. Hopefully, as people try it they will improve on it like adding a little vanilla or something. Also they can decrease the honey a bit if its too sweet for them, though it is a good place to start from so they can make a more personal taste judgement according to their likes after the first 1 gallon batch. At what temperature did your ferment take place and I am curious on what water you used to get such a fast ferment? (hard, soft, spring, etc.)
    Joe

  11. Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    The fast fermentation was mainly due to elevated temperatures. It was very warm when I made the second batch and it's the one that finished in three weeks. Probably up around 25 degrees C... let me see... that's... nearly 80 degrees F.

    The water was just ordinary city tap water here in Halifax. Fleishman's bread yeast. We used a bit more honey (3 pounds works out to 1.36Kg, and we used 1.5Kg). Also, I think my girlfriend put in 15 rasins, 2 cloves and the orange. As I say, I would put in still more cloves, and chop the cinnamon stick in half, but I make this one for her.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    The OC
    Posts
    7,874

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Great recipe Joe!

    Looks like a winner to me. I'm going to have some small bottles on hand as I will be making a 10 gal cyser batch next week. So once I have the cyser cranked out I can get a couple of bottles and go to town on the ancient stuff.

    I may get holy and use the Lalvin yeast though! LOL I'll probably use some coriander and smidge of sweet paprika for the spices. I love that combination.

    Oskaar
    Is it tasty . . . precious?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Independence, KY and Greenacres, FL
    Posts
    1,200

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Quote Originally Posted by Derf
    The fast fermentation was mainly due to elevated temperatures. It was very warm when I made the second batch and it's the one that finished in three weeks. Probably up around 25 degrees C... let me see... that's... nearly 80 degrees F.
    That great info Jay,
    Not that many may care but obviously the higher temperature of 80F promotes a much more rapid fermentaion with Fleischmanns yeast. Three weeks for Ancient mead... that a record. Mine got shorter when I did the 2nd batch in the kitchen which was 73 versus 68 in my basement.
    Oskaar, you will have to rename the drink after you use that different yeast. That's too futuristic for an ancient mead.
    You'll probably rack it too following too many rules for a renagade such as yourself.
    Joe

  14. Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    "Futuristic Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead"

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    The OC
    Posts
    7,874

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    I'll keep it ancient by using an ancient amphora flask from the Adriatic to pitch the yeast, and I'll chant ancient incantations while racking to a drinking vessel!

    LOL

    Oskaar
    Is it tasty . . . precious?

  16. Default I started a batch, and....

    I started a modified (and updated) version of Joe's Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead over the weekend, and I must say... It smells WONDERFUL! It's real hard to keep from dipping my mug in the bucket every time I walk into the fermentation room (second bathroom). Hopefully I'll be able to hold out until it's cleared and bottled! I'm definitely glad Joe decided to share this recipe!

    Lyle

  17. Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Joe... this one sounds like the batch I'm doing now... my first. But I have tea in it and you've put raisins in it... is this the tannin part? I think I might prefer the raisins instead of the black tea.
    Also the recipe I used called for a handfull of cloves and a handfull of allspice... almost sounds like too much compared to your recipe.
    Thanks tho...
    Suzy Q Brewmistress

  18. #18

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    just curious...how many cloves did you use in how much mead? in fact what was your recipe?

  19. #19

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    The raisins actually add an all natural nutrient for the yeast to enjoy, so this would be an alternative to yeast nutrient you buy at the brew store. Or at least that's how it's been explained to me...

    Talon.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    The OC
    Posts
    7,874

    Default Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead

    Talon has it right, the raisins add a vialble level of nutrient to the recipe from what I understand, and also give it another dimension to the taste complexity. A "rounder" mouthfeel as some would say.

    I just made a cyser using raisins and dates, but still had the nutrient and energizer added.

    Next mass batch I make I'll also add some dried black currants, and some dried cherries; and eliminate the nutrient and energizer.

    Joe's recipe sounds excellent, and I'm going to make one too. Being the rebel that I am, I'll be using red star bread yeast instead of Fleishmann's! LOL

    Oskaar - Rebel without a clue! . . . Legend in his own mind
    Is it tasty . . . precious?

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Ancient Orange, Clove, and Cinnamon Mead
    By MrK in forum Mead NewBees - Post your Questions Here
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-10-2008, 11:43 PM
  2. Re: Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead
    By Suzy_Q_Brewmistres in forum Archives
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-24-2004, 05:16 AM
  3. Ancient Orange Cinnamon & Clove Mead
    By Jmattioli in forum Archives
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-14-2004, 07:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •